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Of course they didn't credit my buddy who delivered their replacement motor, showed/helped them replace it and hauled out their dead one...

Meh.
I'm sure a credit in the movie would be more meaningful, but Jessica and Tom did give him good props and recognition when they showed the film at our movie night event.
 

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The number of people that have boated some of those creeks and falls is in the 100s, if that. My point was we all know what the Green and Colorado look like. With the funding and size of that film they could have gone somewhere much more unique and actually made a film FOR boaters, not one about them.
Did you watch it? It’s not about boating as much as it is about that particular watershed and it’s issues. The multi day trip was the vehicle for getting the issues out to be discussed.
 

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Did you watch it? It’s not about boating as much as it is about that particular watershed and it’s issues. The multi day trip was the vehicle for getting the issues out to be discussed.
Of course I did...and if you watch the short film I
originally posted, it to touched on a particular watershed and it's geology (less about our indigenous neighbors obviously, as the eastern tribes are sadly far removed from their traditional lands...or worse). I suppose my smart ass remarks may have come off wrong.

I was asked what I'd like to see in a WW documentary and I responded. This film while obviously worthwhile, just ain't to my taste.

As someone planning on a White through Deso trip this spring, I'm terribly jealous of the members of this production that got to row all those beautiful miles.
 

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I think it tried to be too many things. A buddy river video, an expedition video, a river documentary, a science video, a tribal documentary...but it was none of those things on their own and it didn't weave them very well together.
I really wanted to like this documentary. MT4Runner hit it on the head - I couldn't figure out what this was trying to say to me as it skimmed the surface of so many topics. I realize the broad scope perhaps stimulates discussions on lots of topics (not a bad thing), but as a stand alone documentary, I thought this fell short. Nothing inaccurate about the messages - we're running out of water, we flooded glorious canyons, art is nice, big rapids can go bad, white people ruined everything, native americans got screwed, etc; but it superficially hit on all these points. Not trying to be a hater as I appreciate the challenge of something like this - like I said, I really wanted to like this.
 

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I watched the entire documentary and enjoyed most of it. I do agree with many that constant vilification of "American" History is getting old. I don't think any country on this planet has a history of rainbows and unicorns. Let's start focusing on making the future brighter instead of trying dig up every skeleton of the past.

Unfortunately overpopulation is the subject that always gets skirted when we talk about the over-use of our natural resources. Growing municipalities with millions of people are really what is weighing in on the issue. The Colorado is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to water and water rights in this country. Sad but true. There is also a chance 10 years from now there will be flooding all over the West and the flood gates will be open trying to rid these old rickety Dams of every gallon possible. I believe the right approach is conservation but the future is never predictable.
 

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I liked it. I really enjoyed and appreciated the material that Ben K and others have posted over the last couple of years, including during the filming. I went in with no expectations and wasn't disappointed. I'm assuming they ran it on mostly science/research permits (J Flo, can you share?). I appreciate the time these folks put into this, they don't owe us anything.

[Good question about the permits. Tom (expedition leader) worked for a couple of years to get them all lined up. The Lodore permit was the most difficult to secure. Deso was not difficult. If I remember correctly the last permit didn't get issued until a couple of months prior to launch. Lodore, Deso and the Grand Canyon were all admin/science permits. Throughout the expedition, we had 32 USGS employees from various locales throughout the U.S. join us for 3-11 day segments. Those folks and other crew members conducted daily science experiments throughout the 70-day expedition...Dusk& dawn bird song survey, overnight bat call survey, beach sand sampling for microplastics, water clarity samples, water conditions survey (temp. & pH) and cyanotype photography of dominant vegetation. Those results are still being studied.]

I agree that the beans scene was not needed.

Also, thanks to NRS for putting this out there to the larger public audience. They obviously weren't a major sponsor and I appreciated that it wasn't an NRS fashion show. Cool of them.
 

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Jessica, first of all, THANK YOU for taking the time to respond in person. As both @Blade&Shaft and @yesimapirate both noted, we're probably a harsh group of critics on this forum, especially also being river lovers...and also the fact that it's winter and we wish we were out boating and instead are arguing with each other on the internet to pass the time.

[You're welcome. Apologies for the delay in response since early Jan....I went and got myself an ankle replacement on Jan.5 and neglected to check back in. I appreciate the feedback and conversation. I wish I was on the river, too!]


If you could produce some shorter followup features of him or other indigenous trip participants, that would be awesome. Their point of view and voices haven't been heard as much as others.. [Good idea! I'm not sure what Ben and Cody have in mind for future clips. I'll mention to them the interest.]


Can you link some of those? I'm a 13 hour drive away from Wyoming. It's cool that they were inspired, but I'd love to see some of the art this trip inspired.
That might also be worth a followup featurette. [I love this idea. Pat has shown post-trip art at the USGS building in Virginia, Walnut, CA at Mt. San Antonio College and at the University of Wyoming Art Museum. He also produced art for the recent publication "Cornerstone at the Confluence: Navigating the Colorado River Compact's Next Century". He has also sold some of the post trip paintings. The watercolor images he created on the river are excellent, too. I have photos of a few at home that I will try to round up and post here. Photo below is the two paintings at my shop that Pat created pre-expedition.]

Building Textile Art Painting Paint


THANK YOU again.
The Colorado and related water issues are already a topic of frequent conversation here. I think you did kickstart some additional worthy dialogue. [I agree! Thanks for posting the topic and offering everyone an opportunity to share their thoughts. It will take all of us...river runners, agricultural users, government agencies, community members and more to help address the many challenging issues facing the Colorado River Basin and its users.]
Sincerely,
Shawn
 

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Of course I did...and if you watch the short film I
originally posted, it to touched on a particular watershed and it's geology (less about our indigenous neighbors obviously, as the eastern tribes are sadly far removed from their traditional lands...or worse). I suppose my smart ass remarks may have come off wrong.

I was asked what I'd like to see in a WW documentary and I responded. This film while obviously worthwhile, just ain't to my taste. [Thanks for taking the time to watch the documentary. I find that it is very gratifying to have so many people watch and want to dialogue about the issues.]

As someone planning on a White through Deso trip this spring, I'm terribly jealous of the members of this production that got to row all those beautiful miles. [I've been running rivers for 43 years and it was a dream come true to row all those beautiful miles. I've experienced "Rim Shock" after 33 days on the Grand Canyon but never quite to the level or length that I had after finishing this 70-day expedition. All I wanted to do for six months was be back on the river.]
 
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