Mountain Buzz banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Howdy everyone new here and why i don't do much whitewater I recently bought a drift boat and I'm in the process of restoring it and getting it float ready. I just purchased some cataract oars and planed on using sleeves at the time. But now i have changed my mind and decided rope wrap. I have done a few searches and they lead me here with a lot of good information on how to wrap . But i wondered if you could give me your opinion on this rope? 150 ft - 3/16" Quality Black Polyester Rope - Style DB - eBay (item 120502673917 end time Dec-13-09 06:05:25 PST) Its a polyester diamond braid with a inner fiberglass strand also whats the preference 1/8 or 3/16. thanks for any help
Kurt
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,023 Posts
Kurt,

You may want to check out this thread or this thread and give Chip or Randaddy a PM as they have some experience with it. Others will chime in as well.

-AH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Kurt,

You may want to check out this thread or this thread and give Chip or Randaddy a PM as they have some experience with it. Others will chime in as well.

-AH
Thanks when i started my search google brought me here and the first thread is the one that showed me how to do wrap them I been practicing until i felt confident i could do it with a piece of PVC pipe and some old poly rope i had here :D

 

·
Beginner
Joined
·
2,470 Posts
I wouldn't use a rope with a separate sheath and core, it will keep the epoxy from oozing into the braid of the cord itself. It's tempting to use the cord with the kern and mantle, because it comes in cool patterns, but what you want looks more like traditional rope - just made of plastic.

The cord that I recommend is from my comments in the thread linked below. When you're buying the cord, do it in person and make sure you're buying the tightest braid possible in the diameter you've chosen. Also pull it TIGHT while you're wrapping it. Coat the shaft with epoxy (I'd use the new Gorilla Epoxy and make sure you have plenty of extra - it will take 1-2 standard $5 tubes per oar), wear gloves, and don't stop until you've tightly wrapped the entire section. Then have a cool sip of your beer.

The most important thing I can't stress enough: set up your boat how you will sit in it and then do so. Put the oars in your hands and space them like you like them. Mark the spot where your rubber stopper will go. Test wrap an oar without epoxy to see how long the wrapped section will be with the length of cord you are using (I liked 50 foot sections per oar, but some old school guys use a much smaller section) and mark the oars so that the rubber donut sits about 1/4-1/3 of the way into the wrap from the handle side.

It's a fun project, read those other posts and have a good time.

http://www.mountainbuzz.com/forums/f15/rope-wrap-how-to-23495-2.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,099 Posts
The threads Andy linked are worth reading. On page 5 of the first one is a discussion of rope and a photo of the good and the bad. The standard wrap, that driftboat builders use, is Sawyer Pro-Line. 3/16" in white or black. I special-ordered a 500 ft. roll from NRS.

Rope with a core and mantle is designed for stretch, to absorb shock, and tends to get sloppy when wrapped on oars.

Randy and I disagree on epoxy.

I use a dab to secure the outboard end of the wrap, that gets shoved in and out of the oarlocks. The main reason for wrapping with rope is the smooth, soft feel, and quiet action. If you slather the whole wrap in epoxy resin, and make it a hard, rigid unit, you might as well buy those plastic sleeves and save the money and considerable time to do rope wraps.

If you don't use epoxy, you can always tighten the wrap if it gets sloppy, or replace it easily.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the info. I will email nrs tomorrow and find out about the proline. From the information I'm kinda gathering here a person would want about 75 feet for each oar is that a good assumption? I have 9 foot oars and beam on my boat is around 73 inches.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,099 Posts
For most applications, a 40 ft. wrap on a 2-inch shaft is plenty. If you might use the oars on boats of differing width, a 50 ft. wrap will be more than enough. Just make sure you set the oars in the locks with the boat rigged, so you get them marked right. Most of the wrap should be outboard of the lock, with 3-4 inches inboard of the donut.

Best is to make it a two-person gig, with one handling the rope and one rotating the oar. Really reef on it—you can't get it too tight by hand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
For most applications, a 40 ft. wrap on a 2-inch shaft is plenty. If you might use the oars on boats of differing width, a 50 ft. wrap will be more than enough. Just make sure you set the oars in the locks with the boat rigged, so you get them marked right. Most of the wrap should be outboard of the lock, with 3-4 inches inboard of the donut.

Best is to make it a two-person gig, with one handling the rope and one rotating the oar. Really reef on it—you can't get it too tight by hand.
Cool thanks I will order 50 for each oar then that way i will have plenty. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,099 Posts
Cascade Outfitters also sells Sawyer Pro-Line. I think it's in their online catalog, but maybe hard to find.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top