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I am planning on learning to kayak this spring (have a duckie and 14 foot daft w/ frame)- I got a rpm dagger max from a friend- my question is this boat too big to learn in (rolling especially) for me at 5-9 , 167 lbs ?
 

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If you take the time and outfit it so you have good contact points everywhere it will be fine to learn to roll and paddle around. It is a larger boat for your size but it is older so not all that big to begin with compared to boats out now. If you find it to be cumbersome that boat has a good resale value for how old it is and should be enough to swap to something else used that is smaller.
 

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Sick boat. Good to learn in. Something to note, if you can paddle that kayak, you'll be able to paddle lots of other kayaks. That said, if you find the sport frustrating at first, focus on the basics, as that boat can be more difficult than newer designs to turn, and control. My point being, if you find frustration at first, focus on the basics and you'll find that that kayak will take you very far in the sport. The ease that comes with newer designs can make for lazy paddlers, focus on the skills and you won't be one of those! Have all the fun in a new sport!!
 

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Hang onto that boat...find a larger boater with the regular RPM looking for a trade. Old RPM's are coveted. Early 2000's it was easy to find them used for $150. Now they're $500.
It is maybe a little big for you, but honestly not bigger than a small Mamba.
 

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I still use an RPM for my kayak. For a while I had three. One went to a good home a year ago or so. Original one is retired. Second one came from a friend who didn't like it; it was from the 2009 run. Then I bought one for a Grand Canyon trip that actually had <gasp> factory outfitting. Still love that boat. Not enough room for self support, but that's what the Tornado is for. Or the raft....

You're on the small side for the Max as already mentioned, but for sure it's still a decent boat. My Tornado is way too big for me to paddle it empty; for day trips if I want to take it out I toss in a couple gallon jugs of water to get the hull all the way engaged.

Most recent whitewater boat has a big hole in top through which water may enter, and I use a single blade paddle for that. If you decide canoes are your thing, they can be lots of fun too. You might swim more initially, but if you're just learning you'll probably swim out of any boat. I sure did.
 
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Most recent whitewater boat has a big hole in top through which water may enter, and I use a single blade paddle for that. If you decide canoes are your thing, they can be lots of fun too. You might swim more initially, but if you're just learning you'll probably swim out of any boat. I sure did.
learning hard new things is the bomb.
I felt the same way going from alpine to tele..now I've been tele skiing longer, but I sure loved the learning curve. Have thought about learning to snowboard but don't think my shoulders/elbows/wrists/knees/hips/face would enjoy the learning curve as much as my brain would.
 

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I’m 5’10”, 150lbs, and had the RPM Max for a while. It was roomy but with pushing the foot pegs all the back and the seat all the way forward, I was able to roll fairly well. It probably would have worked even better if I put more/bigger pads in. It was a great boat to get out in, but I did eventually sell for a smaller boat. It should work for you for a while until you are ready to take it up another level.
 

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Honestly your skills at rolling or otherwise are more dependent upon quality instruction. I have seen excellent instructors (former wildwater/whitewater/olympic paddlers) teach and the immediate progression of skills was light years ahead of what was offered by friends, local paddling clubs, or mom and pop outfits. The problem with average instruction is that bad habits are not neutralized ASAP, and they hang on and interfere with skill development. So, get the best instruction you can afford.
My 2 cents.
 

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Honestly your skills at rolling or otherwise are more dependent upon quality instruction. I have seen excellent instructors (former wildwater/whitewater/olympic paddlers) teach and the immediate progression of skills was light years ahead of what was offered by friends, local paddling clubs, or mom and pop outfits. The problem with average instruction is that bad habits are not neutralized ASAP, and they hang on and interfere with skill development. So, get the best instruction you can afford.
My 2 cents.
I couldn't agree more. I'm a longtime kayaker, and have taught more than a few people to roll, and thought I was "pretty good". Did an ACA whitewater instructor cert last summer and added some crazy new tips to my bag of tricks and have students rolling a LOT faster. And you absolutely don't want to burn in any bad habits.

Don't even need an instructor who is a former high-level paddler..some of them are good at what they do and not good teachers. Find someone who is a good teacher.
 
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