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Discussion Starter #1
I got into white water kayaking by renting duckies. Loved every minute on the water very stable IK didn’t flip not once my 1st time. After renting a few times I decided to buy my own. I ended up purchasing Lynx 1 after thorough research and the 10 year warranty you can’t beat! My 1st time on the lynx 1 IK did not go so smooth as expected!! I flipped so many times !! It was embarrassing flipping in front my my buddies on easy class 3 rapids. I hit bulls sluice (Class 4+) and it completely wiped me out !! What happend?? I did so good on a duckie. Please provide me feedback. I don’t want to feel discouraged about my purchase.
 

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well in a nut shell 4+ is alot for an ik to handle heck class 4 in general and if your first trip in a new boat is class 3 and above you might want some practice time on something easier. do you have leg straps? foot pegs? if you're flipping alot maybe you need to let alittle air out of the bottom so u sink down further lots of things to consider.
 

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Good advice, and definitely take it mellower at first.
Sounds like you may need to learn to read water a bit more, as well. One thing about a duckie, or really any smaller boat, is if you hit an opposing current i any direction other than head on, it will tend to flip you. The same goes for eddie lines, the strong ones love to flip duckies, big ones can flip large rafts.
Foot pegs and thigh straps can give ya lots more control, specially when you hit something a little crooked, since you can "EDGE" your boat, to some degree, just like a kayaker would.

Taking a swift water rescue course is a really good idea as a new boater, even for experienced boater, really.
 

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What kind of duckie did you rent before you bought?

Many "livery" iks are high floatation, large tube diameter, low rocker boats and they are quite a bit more stable than the sportier IKs.

The Lynx is a great boat, and one of my 2 go-to IKs. If I am running big water or IV+ though I like some overnight gear in the boat to settle it down and give it some mass. Low volume IV is where I think the Lynx is really at its best without gear, but frankly, I like a flat hulled foam floor boat like a Stiletto for that use.

One thing I hear a lot about the Lynx is people feeling like they are sitting too high. This is something you can get used to, and frankly, it works to your advantage giving you more leverage on your strokes. I really like how the Lynx lets you move the seating position a little forward of most other IKs.

For boat rigging, def you want thigh straps for IV water. Foam instead of footpegs keeps the bow light by displacing water, and can't break or hurt you, unlike pegs.

But mostly, you just stepped up your boating in a new boat! No worries that you had some swims. It's part of IKing.

But to make good friends with your boat, get it out on runs you know, at a variety of flows. Dial in your eddy turns and your surfing on small friendly features. You'll have that Lynx feeling like home in no time.

Every boat is different and the same moves that worked in one maybe wont in another. There is no replacement for time in the boat and learning its behavior.

That's what yer counting on when you step it up!

If you still feel its unstable, I'd find an AIRE Outfitter 1 to try. Many gnar IKers are switching liking the extra stability of the bigger tubes.

Cheers!
 

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Great idea about using foam instead of foot pegs!
 

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first of all, do not kick your self.

I had several years of pretty good experience in canoes and kayak and Bull Sluice kicked my butt a couple times.
I lived in North Georgia. Went to NOC for some clinics, then spent a lot of time on both banks watching who had good and bad runs. I saw the line most successful boaters went and how they paddled that line.
finally had a good run followed by more good runs. Then I did section 4 which is another story.

Some one once told me "any rapid is easy once you understand how to run it"

Be safe and have fun.

Dave "over the hill beat up creek boater" Reid
 

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Similar advice to hardshell kayakers:

Don't just jump from Class III to Class IV. If you can run III pretty well, start playing it harder. Stuff yourself into holes and surf everything you can. Then you should have decent skills to run IV.

If you want to move up to IV+...start playing the holes in IV- first.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Explain the foam for feet pegs please. I am aware that Aire sells a inflatable foot peg. Should I buy that?
 

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The inflatable thwart is a good option, and should work with no modifications on the Lynx. Will pack up smaller than the foam block, if that matters.

When I make foam foot blocks, I shape a 4x12x24 block of minicell. 4x12x24 closed cell foam - $22.00 : Kayak Outfitting, Kayak foam and outfitting accessories

I prefer foam mostly just because I can completely fill the bow, keeping it dry and light.

I have never paddled the Star IK, so can't comment on it vs other boats.

Lots of good advice so far about surfing, running hard lines in known rapids, and working on running larger holes.
 

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I’m new so sorry for asking dumb questions ahead of time. What do you mean play in holes?
No offense, but you are probably not ready for class IV if you don't understand holes or playing in them!!!

This book is a fantastic resource, not only for kayaking, but for reading water and understanding why and how whitewater behaves the way it does:
https://www.amazon.com/Kayak-Animated-Intermediate-Whitewater-Technique/dp/B002FL5EG2

No two holes are alike. You don't have to avoid all of them. Some are ugly and to be avoided at all cost. Some will eat your lunch, give you back change, but let you live. Some are actually quite friendly.

Some of the best surfing is in smallish holes that are not quite a fully developed hole, yet no longer a wave. There's a small foam pile on top, they're slightly retentive, but they will let you out if you start having a bad time.

Being able to read holes, waves, eddies, etc...on Class III will be a huge asset when you move up to Class IV.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I’ve heard of playing don’t get me wrong and seen much videos but don’t see people doing it in IK. Thank go advice guys:):):)
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I’m new so sorry for asking dumb questions ahead of time. What do you mean play in holes?
No offense, but you are probably not ready for class IV if you don't understand holes or playing in them!!!

This book is a fantastic resource, not only for kayaking, but for reading water and understanding why and how whitewater behaves the way it does:
https://www.amazon.com/Kayak-Animated-Intermediate-Whitewater-Technique/dp/B002FL5EG2

No two holes are alike. You don't have to avoid all of them. Some are ugly and to be avoided at all cost. Some will eat your lunch, give you back change, but let you live. Some are actually quite friendly.

Some of the best surfing is in smallish holes that are not quite a fully developed hole, yet no longer a wave. There's a small foam pile on top, they're slightly retentive, but they will let you out if you start having a bad time.

Being able to read holes, waves, eddies, etc...on Class III will be a huge asset when you move up to Class IV.



I bought both books that were recommended thank you for your help
 

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I prefer thigh straps to foot pegs or a block in a ducky. You get a lot more side to side control and better bracing imho.
 
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