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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I am curious if anyone can shed some light on these questions i have and cant seem to find an answer for them. I have a old old 11FT Hyside bucket boat that was left outside by the previous owner and is a little rough. No leaks or anything like that but the rub guard is cracked beyond belief and the floor has a spot where the previous owner maybe used like a cement or something to bond it back to the raft. It works but definitely has seen better days. First thing i thought about was having this one cleaned up and repaired properly by someone in Denver. Second was looking at a new bigger boat, (13ft since it fits my frame) i mainly use it for fishing and gear hauling. I looked at the Aire Tributary and RMR W/ Drop stitch floor. Are either of these better than the other? The Aire is much cheaper right now and a less on shipping (Trib-2879.00 shipped/RMR-3799.00 shipped). Is it worth going with another Hypalon boat over these two if so what brand or model? I don't float a ton hoping at least every other weekend this summer, but we all know how that goes trying to find time isn't always easy. I appreciate any insight, Thanks!!
 

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The most direct answer is to buy the best boat your budget can afford. So yes, buy the hypalon.

I had a similar experience, older boat, wanting newer/better and wanted to keep my frame. I purchased my newer boat based on my current frame size, and I regret that. Had I spent more time figuring out what I really wanted, I would have a boat that really does what I need it to do.
 

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Sounds like you're comparing the Trib to RMR's drop stitch floor option FWIW. Their standard self bailer is comparably priced to the Trib. That said, as John mentioned the Trib will be easier to handle on land, and I've always been pleased with how my 14 handles on the water. I also agree you shouldn't limit yourself to boats your frame will fit. If you want a 13 because that's what you really want and you're confident you'll be satisfied with that size that's one thing, but a 14 will go anywhere a 13 will and carry more gear and/or people to boot. Happy hunting!
 

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Hypalon will probably double your initial cost for rubber. I have had great experiences with both the Tribs and RMRs, but as noted above, the RMR will be heavier. You won't get a new hypalon boat for under about $6000.

I'd probably go with the Trib, but that's biased based on my prior good experiences and my personal cheapness.
 

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Only real downside to the Tributary is they only make one color. If color matters to you...get the RMR. If not....the Tributary boat will work great for you and will be marginally lighter and much easier to roll up. The RMR's floor will be stiffer due to the drop stitch but pretty easy to do an even more solid drop floor off your frame.

I think the upgrade to Hypalon or a premium PVC boat like Aire's USA made line of boats is worth it. Just nicer materials and design overall and usually a better warranty. I have both a Hyside and an Aire raft and really like both and feel like they were worth spending a little more. I also waited for a deal on both though...so that is a thing.
 

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If it were me, and I had a limited budget, I would definitely go with the Tributary over the RMR (for me the weight difference between the 2 boats is a big issue). Right now at 20% off on the Trib from places like Outdoorplay you can get a 14 foot Tributary for less than $3000, thats pretty good and it will certainly last you a long time and be a lot of fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hypalon.. And buy what you want, you'll regret buying a boat around a frame you have.

NRS, Hyside etc, you can't go wrong with a Hypalon boat. ..
Will hypalon be more durable over the trib? Like hitting rocks and what not? Also I have a big horn frame from nrs and its 60" wide so I figure why not use it. I did see a 14ft hyside that recommended a 60 inch frame. And it was around $5200 just don't know if I really wanna drop that much money for my limited use and not really much big white water. will a hypalon boat roll up better than pvc in really cold weather?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
If it were me, and I had a limited budget, I would definitely go with the Tributary over the RMR (for me the weight difference between the 2 boats is a big issue). Right now at 20% off on the Trib from places like Outdoorplay you can get a 14 foot Tributary for less than $3000, thats pretty good and it will certainly last you a long time and be a lot of fun.
Yeah just trying to keep cost down which is harder than it seems haha. I do like the nrs and hyside alot just alot more money. The trib does look like a decent boat for the money though. All the options hahah
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Cut the frame width slightly (if needed) and grab a Hyside Max 12. It’s super fun to row and is barely more expensive than the RMR.
I have considered this but I would like to be able to have 2 fishing and 1 rower. The 12 is just alittle small for that. The smaller boats are alot of fun though, if I had the money I'd buy both!
 

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Will hypalon be more durable over the trib? Like hitting rocks and what not? Also I have a big horn frame from nrs and its 60" wide so I figure why not use it. I did see a 14ft hyside that recommended a 60 inch frame. And it was around $5200 just don't know if I really wanna drop that much money for my limited use and not really much big white water. will a hypalon boat roll up better than pvc in really cold weather?
It's absolutely more durable, a hypalon boat will last decades, the tributary, well it has a 10 year warranty most people love .. Hypalon boat doesn't have zippers or need the high maintenance a bladder boat like a trib needs. It also will easily roll up much smaller and tighter than a plastic boat like an aire or rmr.. Hypalon boats floors don't hold water either like a tributary either, making them much easier to row and carry out of the water.

The E140 that psu96 is selling is a great Hypalon boat. Used boats can be a great way to get your rig. A lot of people bought boats during the china virus panic, and now with inflation can't afford to keep them. Some decent deals to be had if you look. Also, a lot of times boat repair businesses have lines on good used boats.
 

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Back to your original question though, I would jump on that tributary deal. The weight savings are really nice and the price difference seals the deal. For as little as it sounds like you are going to use the boat, a Trib should last a very long time as long as you keep it away from UV rays.
 
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