Mountain Buzz banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
Alex, thank you for posting that. I really enjoyed it. That is next on my tick list. Done westy a few times, I think I'm ready for cataract at similar flows. Even with the oar deal (ordeal) get it? Looked like you have no problems. Great job.

Skyman
 

·
The Russian
Joined
·
1,389 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Glad you liked it. It really helps to go with someone who knows the canyon and know the runs.

I didn't record the Big Drop 2, camera turned off right before the rapid, but that's pretty technical run as well, though a fun one!

Most of the other rapids are in order in my video.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Glad you liked it. It really helps to go with someone who knows the canyon and know the runs.

I didn't record the Big Drop 2, camera turned off right before the rapid, but that's pretty technical run as well, though a fun one!

Most of the other rapids are in order in my video.
After the thread on oar leashes you still use them? I've never seen them until this video and appear to be possibly very dangerous.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,308 Posts
Very nice video of a good solid run through Cat. rapids, wish I was there. The tethered (oar leashes) oar has nothing to do with your boating skills, but is more of an equipment misunderstanding. A fellow river guide had his wooden spair oar come lose from the front cradle, with the back half of the cradle still attached to the oar. Going through a series of rapids in North Gate Canyon, the front of the spair oar hit a rock and splintered off with the back half still attached to the boat. it started jumping around, stabing his life jacket and cargo behind him. Composite oars probably would not be as lethal. Plus if you flip the tether would be something else to get tangled up in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Alex, thanks for the video. We did Cat on 10-02-10-04. I did swim in BD 3 but very short and I was back in my boat, a little to far right of the first slot. I showed my wife your video and she said nothing, just looked at me with "that look". Cat was a great trip! Another step for me "the beginning boater". Can't wait for the next adventure.
Be safe Dennis
 

·
The Russian
Joined
·
1,389 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Dennis, you are welcome. I assume your wife isn't a boater? hehe

Raymo, so if you don't use tethers, what do you use not to lose your popped oar? Actually Cat was my first trip with oar locks, I always rowed pins/clips. So I will be interested in alternatives. Most of my friends have tethers on their oars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
I run tethers when I think there's a good chance of flipping, but the rest of the time my oarlocks are tight enough that I'll only lose an oar if I really bash a rock hard. And if that's a case, I want the oar to fly away rather than be swinging around into my head while I'm still in the boat. I'll take the odds when I'm in the water too... I figure if I'm still upright, I can slap on my spare and chase down a loose oar pretty quick.
I would wack on your oar locks a bit until you can only fit the oar in down at the blade, then leave the tethers on if you want and you shouldn't have any problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Nice video! Low water Cataract is a lot of fun. Its definitely a step up from Westwater, but very doable for any competent boater if you scout the Big Drops.

I like leashes a lot for big water. I had an oar pop out in Grapevine in the Grand Canyon, and i'm sure I would have never seen it again without the leash. As it was, I was able to grab it and have it on quicker than it would have taken to get a spare on. I'm not as enthusiastic about them in rocky low water runs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,308 Posts
Dennis, you are welcome. I assume your wife isn't a boater? hehe

Raymo, so if you don't use tethers, what do you use not to lose your popped oar? Actually Cat was my first trip with oar locks, I always rowed pins/clips. So I will be interested in alternatives. Most of my friends have tethers on their oars.
First off, I do not use tethers (leashes) on my oars, that is my personal preference. When I select a piece of equipment that has a potential safety hazard I weigh the benefit(s) of it's intended use over the severity of the hazard created by it. I have never used tethers (leashes) because I have seen several rafts flip and assisted in recovery of raft and people afterward and seen unusal entanglements of both people and gear. Add to all this, another set of oars attached to the boat by a length of lashing (straping, rope etc.) it could spell disaster for rescuer(s) and people being rescued. Plus the incident that I discribed earler on North Gate Canyon, all contribute to my decision not to use tethers. If you break or bend an oar navigating a series of huge and technical rapids, do you want the damaged oar floping in and out of the boat while trying to access your spair, then trying to meneuver your boat with it is still flying past your head. Remember you are flying around like a spastic fly yourself. Always watch and guard your oars as the skilled boatman you are and you will not need the leashes to keep your oars from leaving you behind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
the comments regarding banging on the oarlocks until they are tight enough to barely pop in or only go in by the blade is good advice. I use to pop mine occassionally in bigger rapids until I made this quick fix. Never let them out of my hand though so didn't think i needed leashes. Then I read all of the advice concerning possible safety issues with leashes and would never use them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,607 Posts
I would never not use them. The risks of being without an oar are too high in my opinion. Key to keep the oarlocks tight, as mentioned, so they don't pop unnecessarily as in the video, but it's tough since the oarlocks can open/loosen at any time anyways. If you're boating big water (IV/V), you do NOT want to be without an oar. Getting a spare oar in the middle of the shit is a fantasy. Weird accidents from tethers are always going to make "the news", but I think they are used thousands and thousands of times safely without incident, providing more safety than risk. All of our gear provides both risk and safety, and we have to weigh both.
 

·
The Russian
Joined
·
1,389 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
86304, we stayed at Gypsum camp and then motored out the last 30 miles. Gypsum isn't too bad of a camp, very muddy by the river though, but very pretty landscape around. I haven't looked for the sites below that, was snoozing :)

raymo, funny you mention that. My last run (well first as well) through Murtaugh exactly proved what you described. When I flipped and broke my oar, the oar kept kicking me in the knee and I couldn't get the boat up right before the next rapid, after that I had to swim the rapids hanging to my boat.

YouTube - Snake river through Murtaugh canyon
 

·
The Russian
Joined
·
1,389 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
the comments regarding banging on the oarlocks until they are tight enough to barely pop in or only go in by the blade is good advice. I use to pop mine occassionally in bigger rapids until I made this quick fix. Never let them out of my hand though so didn't think i needed leashes. Then I read all of the advice concerning possible safety issues with leashes and would never use them.

Do you leave any oar play in the oar lock or it's pretty snug in there? Mine has about 1/4 of an inch play right now. I meant to say with Oar Rights, but I guess you guys are all open oar?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,607 Posts
I get it as tight as I can, which almost always has some play. I use rights. I considered going free, but for surfing, big IV, and now getting into V, free just isn't an option. There are a lot of threads on adjusting, there is the issue with the cobras on getting them too tight down at the oar body, there's a way to bend the ears and not the entire top shaft so you don't pinch the oar. chip's real up on this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
485 Posts
Dang dude, nice Murtaugh carnage. I like the p-i-p replays of the flips. i hope you don't keep seeing that in your dreams. btw, does one run the bigish looking drop on either side of that island?

something tells me there's gona be some debate over tether or not teather. I personally have teathers, it's saved me few oars, but I can sure appreciate trying to avoid the tanglefactor.

having mainly been in muddy waters and not able to see what would happen to an oar if it did get away, will an oar float if popped? does it depend on the oar? (am assuming wood ones probably do, but a cataract or carlile?)

tgif
S.
 

·
The Russian
Joined
·
1,389 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
One way to find out about the float... try it in shallow water :) I assume counter balanced oars won't float. I will test it next weekend at WW

That's Pair-of-Dice rapid I think is the name, anyways, the yakers go down the waterwall, the closer you get to the shore the nastier it gets. There is a screw driver wave that flips pretty much everything. Closer to the rock it gets higher and nastier with the keeper wave.

The rafters go left and do the drop down first waterfall, then a sharp right and drop the second, then catch the main current to the left and go with it. 50/50 you'll flip at 3-5k flow as I am told.

By the time we got to this rapid, I swam 5 class 4 rapids already and was in no shape or form to take this bad boy on. I portaged.

And yes, that day taught me a lot, I didn't get back to a river for about a month after that trip. I want to go back in a 16 footer this time. That river is nasty, but a kayak paradise.

I never turn my camera off, that canyon pissed me off enough that I turned my camera off and packed it away being scared for it to be a hazard catching on something. I swallowed a lot of river water that day heh.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top