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Discussion Starter #1
Ok so I am looking at opinions on kids with mtn arms ?
teaching my kid my mountain ways. Tell me about your mountain experience from sling shots,to ak's;9mm to axes) people know there protection. (Live with a bouey knife under my pillow camping. )Any Advise welcome. (Good or bad)
Thanks everyone! !!!
 

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Does Colorado have a youth hunt day? Around here rifle opens a day or two early if you are under 18 or 16 er something. Nothing like getting in the woods with your Dad at the beginning of hunting season and bagging a big buck before any of the adults have had a chance. You always see some very impressive kills in the newspaper during the youth hunt.

Ultimately if you are wanting to work on protection and use of deadly force, it's good to know that your little one can and will dispatch a big handsome deer. If they can kill for food they surely will kill to save family from harm.
 

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Agreed. I certainly feel like I want more protections from gun toting hunters in the woods than anything else....
 

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Do your child a big favor. Make sure he/she is educated in at least one written language.


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We allowed our girls to have a small pocket knife to whittle, and slingshots for target practice. Gives them something to do and teaches them a little body awareness. They were probably 10-ish. Our older now likes to shoot guns; she's 17.

She's a vegetarian and doesn't want to kill anything. She just likes guns.
 

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I'm a little confused by your post, a bit short on specifics. Are you asking about others experience teaching their kids about weapons and self defense? What does mountain arms, and mountain ways mean? Sadly, when I think of mountain ways I think of the movie Deliverance. As a lifelong shooter and father of 2 I would be happy to relay my experiences but give me a little more detail here.
 

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Make sure you are properly trained yourself first, before attempting to teach others.
I have 2 daughters that are expert gardeners, fly fishing women, hunters and have been professionally trained as have I in the proper use, handling and storage of weapons. They have their CC permits now that they are old enough. They and their children are safer and more likely to survive comfortably come what may then 99% of the USA population IMHO. I get the benefit of having a family that loves to camp, fish, hunt and Raft with me. Who could ask for anything more.
This thread should fire up the PC police.
 

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Grateful one- your mom always said you were good at throwing balls.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ok so I guess I sleep, walked, talked , and posted last night. I am well versed in many weapons, am very big about safety, care, and proper cleaning of all my weapons. I shot my first gun at 5 had a small pocket knife about the same age, had throwing stars and knifes by 7. I guess my question last night was when should I start introducing joey to properly handle a small weapon(knife, bb gun, .22, etc.). I know he is too young now but we camp, fish,raft and such. Thanks for all your comments flame if you must, but trying to give my son the upbringing i had with a generation of new knowledge.
 

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Thanks for the clarifications. I was on a shooting team from age 9-15. We had great instruction and I learned a lot about shooting and discipline at I time when most boys don't have restraint or focus. How old is Joey? I had a knife at 10 and got my first 5 stitches in my finger about a month later. Lesson learned. I took my girls shooting at 7 and 9 and I think that was too early for them. They enjoy shooting a bow on occasion. I think much will be based on what he seems to be able to handle, maturity wise, and his level of interest. Keep them locked up and supervise him for years to come and he will develop the same respect and values you have towards weapons. I think it is great that you are asking around to get other experiences. Good luck.
 

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but trying to give my son the upbringing i had with a generation of new knowledge.
I look back with envy for those who had parents that mentored them in hunting and firearms. I am trying to get into hunting after it was abandoned by both sides of the family 1-2 generations ago and its not easy without those years of experience and background. No to mention how odd it is to be the only 30 year old in a class of elementary school kids for hunter's safety.

One variable would be what age their peers are getting involved. Having a community to help reinforce your philosophy always seems to help. Many states actually run clinics and camps for kids, especially with the relative decline in numbers (they are investing a lot of effort into it because hunters are the primary funding for wildlife conservation). Might be worth looking into.

Best of luck and ignore the haters.

Phillip
 

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Discussion Starter #14
He is 20 months, yes way too young. I have only been hunting once, but learned a lot from my grandpa that time ( including to dispatch the deer that i didn't kill with my shot ( knife to the throat, the only way he would let me do it)). My dad loves guns and target shooting but doesn't like hunting. Taught me how to respect guns, like rob taught me to respect the power of the river. When he wants to start hunting we will learn together, by that time he will know about weapons, safety, and how to clean (after each use) and care for his weapon.Thanks all
 

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I was in 2nd grade when I got my first bb gun, got a .22 the next year

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here's a mom's perspective

I remember an unexpected visit I had from a mom with her three young kiddos. This was before I was married and I was spending the evening cleaning guns and reloading shot shells. I greeted them at the door, the kids rushed in and I turned around in time to see the youngest grabbing for my .38 that I use for my saddle gun. There is no way those guns would have even been in sight had I known I was having visitors. When I had my own kids the first lesson they got was learning not to touch, pick up a real gun. Of course we keep our firearms in a safe and of course they are not loaded but if by chance they see a gun somewhere they will know not to touch. Imho, this should be lesson one and unfortunately usually only gun owners kids get it. It's the most rewarding experience there is to teach your kids about something you love - the more time spent the better with age appropriate activities. From your post you sound experienced and your kids will benefit greatly.
Our parks dept maintains a rifle, trap and indoor range. They even rent guns. They support programs for young shooters - like the above posters suggested, this might be worth checking out.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks saukSister as far as I can remember i knew where the guns and amo where, not kept together. Never locked up but i knew, "every gun is always loaded ". Now of days a gun safe is a necessity.
 

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Whats the tabasco for??? I mean its tasty and everthing but I was just curious. I carry siracha myself.
Tabasco is a very essential survival tool: questionable river meals, x wives cooking, airline food, bloody marrys, worms, grubs, bugs etc. It's saved my ass more than once.
 
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