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Discussion Starter #1
I'm not a motor boater yet but I've been looking into it. Most searches have lead to Pornhub instead of here so I though I'd ask the collective - What spares do you carry? I likely don't see one in the near future but a ~6hp four stoke seems like a good addition down the road. Prop, spark plugs, shear pin, what else?
 

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Use whatever works-

Keep in mind:
1. It will need a LONG shaft
2. Once you have one that works everyone will want to use it
3. Props and rivers are not friends and never will be. Sheer pins by the bag and a spare prop are a must.
4. Gas jugs seems to always leak when they are 110 degrees- so keep that in mind.
 

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Spare props
Prop nut assembly
Shear pin assembly if applicable
Wrench for prop nut
Water pump/impeller
Fuel filter
Water separator
Spark plugs
Lower unit for the bigger motors
Primer bulb if applicable
Fire ext
Something to quick patch a fuel cell to prevent spills
Multiple fuel vessels
Know how to work on your junk
Lanyard in case motor falls off
Tiller extension
Hose clamps
Fuel hose
Fuel line fittings
2 smoke oil
Power tilt set up, if applicable
Starter, if applicable
Fuses
Pliers
Channel lock pliers
HF socket set
Ratcheting wrenches
Screwdrivers
Whiskey
Xanax

Research internets for weak points of your motor and carry all that. For example, some throttle &/or shift cables are weak, some fuel injected motors like to eat ECM's if ran for long periods in really hot direct sun, etc.
 

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Since mine is only used on flat water like Cataract and below Diamond Creek on Grand Canyon and isn't the only means of propulsion I just carry a spare prop, spark plugs, extra oil, starter cord and tools to change the prop and service the motor. My motor doesn't use shear pins. I really can't see myself changing the impeller in the field, I have done it at home and in my opinion it is pretty much a bench job. If I didn't have oars I would carry an impeller. I am proactive and do service the lower end every year at home.
Consider propane fueled when you are looking at motors, I have a 5hp Tohatsu Sail Pro propane and really like it. Small hp gas outboards tend to have fuel delivery problems when not used often, as seems to be the case with most raft motors.
 

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If you can (available within reasonable driving distance), run ethanol-free gas. This makes the most difference on new motor or if you change carb, but it helps even with motors that have been run w/ethanol. Keeps rubber parts (o-rings, etc.) lubricated and minimizes varnish problems.

On kickers (sub-10 hp outboards) carb problems are most common because of occasional use... so run your motor out of gas when you store it (some makes have a drain on the bowl, like my "old" '98 5 hp Honda that is just getting broken in...). Pull the plug, examine it (too rich? too lean? - most are just right, light grey, no damage or buildup on electrode), few drops/squirts of oil on top of piston. Oil is cheap - change it often (engine and lower unit).

Propane eliminates (virtually, nothing is 100% reliable) carb problems. But if you run in sub-freezing conditions you may have other pro'lems... not likely on lake runouts (Cat, Grand, etc.) during "reasonable" weather.

The Achilles heel of all kickers - propane and gas - is the drive shaft. The term "pencil dick" applies... on anything 5-6 hp or less, your drive shaft is approximately the diameter of a pencil... Dinging a prop is a warning - learn to read the flat water and find the deepest channel (both the Colorado and Green good for this, usually sandy bottoms...). An inch or two matters... If you plow into sand/mud at 5-8 mph you run the risk of damaging your drive shaft. Hit the same shit at idle or just underway and likely you will just stir the bottom and come to a halt. Learn when it's safe to get going and when you should just barely be moving.
Bend your (drive) shaft and you are out of business...

If you don't know what spares to bring you probably need more time with someone who does...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Located in SLC so this would mostly be to push thru the flats on Green and Colorado with oars as main power thru the rapids.

88 ethanol free available at most Mavericks.

LPG would be rad but seems harder to find used.

I have a buddy in Moab with a garage full of J Rigs, snouts, sport boats, and Tohatsus and nearly fifty years experience running ‘em. We’re working on getting a trip together but his schedule only seems to have last minute availability.

I just bought my first raft this summer after spending some years paddle raft guiding back East. Trying to piece it together on a ski bum budget. Both my parents retired this year so I’d like to get them on multi day western river trips. Expediting would likely help.

Lots of good info in this thread already. Thanks. I’ve got a lot to learn.
 

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Since you mentioned LPG motors, I'd interject a few things, quieter, you don't have to smell gas all the way down the river, lighter, you don't have to smell gas all the way down the river, longer shafts available than gas, my Tohatsu Sail Pro has a 25 inch shaft which is the perfect length for the ass end of a raft, did I mention that you don't have to smell gas all the way down the river ? My only comment on brands would be the offering from LEHR is junk, and they cost near what a Tohatsu does. Check Ebay, I have 2 friends that found them there for way less than what they cost new. also check the sailboating forums, cause this was their initially intended use.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Does an LPG outboard run on the same fuel as I would burn for my camp stove and blaster? If not, same style container?
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Same fuel as your stove. That's rad and definitely another point for propane.
What do you use to monitor fuel usage on a propane tank?

MNichols and other Tohatsu/Mercury LPG users - Is the Thrust Holder/Propeller hardware kit (61) what replaces a shear pin?

Parts Catalog

61799

61800


Any of y'all dig your shit into sandbar? How bad was the damage?

Updated list for LPG motors. What did I miss?

Know how to work on your junk
Know how to read shallow water
Lanyard in case motor falls off
Pull Start Rope
Throttle cable
Fire extinguisher
Multiple fuel vessels
Spare props
Wrench for prop nut
Prop hardware kit
Tiller extension
Spark plugs & Wrench
Regulator
Engine Oil
Water pump kit
Drive Shaft
Lower unit
Fuses
Channel lock pliers
Needle nose pliers
Socket set
Ratcheting wrenches
Screwdrivers
Whiskey
Xanax
 

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I run a prop guard. Get one and it will cut down on prop damage. You don't need any parts other than a prop. A couple of cotter pins come with the motor get a couple more. It's a clutch that just absorbes shock. I disable the reverse lock out so the motor kicks up if I hit something. You learn just to throttle down quickly when you hit something. I can push out 6 or 7 boats 40 miles on 5 gal of propane below Seperation Canyon on the Grand. That list you have will be heavier than the motor. Worst case you go to plan B and row or drift. Get a service manual.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Great information, thanks.

I'll ditch the spare lower and regulator, but I'm not giving up my whiskey or Xanax.
 

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A Bible, quart of Holly Water and Prayer Beads, that should keep the Linda Blair demons out of your outboard motor and from puking out green slime. Plus some of the other parts listed above and a spair motor.
 

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Tear that tilt lock off before you hang anything off your transom - responsible for more trashed props and worse than any other cause. Just lean out over your powerhead if you need to keep prop down for backing- watch your balance...
 

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This is timely! If you search posts on LPG motors you will find met asking about them. Well I we finally bought a Tohatsu Sail Pro With an extra long shaft for Christmas. We are total motor neophytes and the learning curve is going to be steep. Paying attention to this thread!
 

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I would steer away from 4-strokes. The pros are they're much quieter and use a lot less fuel. The cons are they weigh 50% more but most importantly they are very fickle as to how they are stored on your boat. If you store them incorrectly the oil from the crank case fills the cylinder(s). Fixable on the riv but difficult to accomplish without contaminating the water or beach
 

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Was on a Cataract trip this fall where the group relied on one motor amongst 5 boats. The motor ran (had worked fine on the prior trip of course) and would start up so we had no reason to be concerned after launching at Potash....after about a mile the engine was overheating every 5 mins. The group had a PDF of the engine manual (mostly useless), some engine repair experienced minds, and plenty of beer. Spent a day drifting while doing a complete disassemble on the raft. Turned out the impeller had all but dissintegrated and thus the engine wasn't circulating water to cool its self. So I'd add a "spare impeller" to the list above of parts to have on hand. That said with the right combination of repair kits one can be fashioned from an empty beer can, gorilla tape, and boat glue, and one sacrificed layover day...
61849
61851
61850
 
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