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At some point in the past, I bought several 20's with the intent of making a garden variety river toilet. I sandblasted the interior and exterior painting the inside white and the outside purple. It seemed appropriate and more novel than the standard brown. I also quizzed several old boatmen about how to store fecal matter on a GC length trip. Powdered bleach they all said, just a sprinkle morning and evening. Don't whiz in it and you're all set. This I have done with zero problems. Somebody else mentioned odoban to me and I have added it to my supplies box ever since. On my last trip, I noted the TL pouring ash from the fire pan in the groover. I was mildly put out about this turn of events and asked him why he was doing this, well it keeps the smell down and I thought you had agreed to it he says. Well I asked him to refrain in future as I was concerned about total capacity for poop vs ashes. When I got to the dump station imagine my surprise when I popped open the pooper with the added ashes and a great deal of the interior paint had completely fallen off and considerable rust had formed.
I am assuming that the ashes had produced lye or caustic compounds of some sort or other. The others were as they have always been, pearly white once ya get the poop washed out.
I had never heard of adding ashes, and never will again after this experience.... Is this common practice though? I had never heard of it...Have I simply led a sheltered life?
 

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Never heard of putting ash in the groover. Wood ash is alkaline and contains several compounds of concern, like arsenic. Not sure what would react with paint thought.

Not sure its legal either since it eventually makes its way into our municipal sewer systems.
 

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Try Rhino Buster, I have been using it since the begining of the season and swear by it.
(Not a paid advertisement)
 

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I have been keeping a jar of clean charcoal ashes (saved after DO cooking) near the groover and have folks dust their turds after depositing them.
Not so much for odor, but to keep the flies and bugs at bay.
Not sure where I got the idea (probably here) but it does seem to work.


Sent from my TouchPad using Mountain Buzz mobile app
 

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Wood ash is/was commonly used around here in outhouses for the aforementioned reasons, so that was my first thought as to why he did it.

...and lye was the culprit I instantly assumed as to why you had corrosion issues.

I know nothing about groovers as I can poop in holes in the ground, but I would think that using ash in a pvc groover would work well (as long as it's legal and you have room)
 

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Wood ash is/was commonly used around here in outhouses for the aforementioned reasons, so that was my first thought as to why he did it.

...and lye was the culprit I instantly assumed as to why you had corrosion issues.

I know nothing about groovers as I can poop in holes in the ground, but I would think that using ash in a pvc groover would work well (as long as it's legal and you have room)
I agree it won't effect PVC, but the real problem lies in when you go to dump it. Little pieces of wood can jam up lift pumps and are not made to go through the scat machines.
 
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