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willpaddle4food
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119 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
For some time I have been noticing that any oar tether I use tends to catch at the neck of my carlisle oars, where the shaft meets the blade. Rings, loop straps. Every damn thing, really. I've sort of tolerated it until now, but twice this weekend I couldn't get an oar back into the yoke because the tether was binding at the neck of the blade, and it sort of mattered a whole lot both times. My first thought was to fix the problem by cutting the tether and throwing the damn oar in the river, but....I'm sort of cheap, and have about twelve damn carlisle oars for three boats. Surely most Carlisle owners have encountered this problem? Anybody have a quick modification? My best thought so far is to take a foam swimming pool noodle, slip about 3" over the neck of the paddle, and go large with duct tape or gorilla tape or something. Any other thoughts?
 

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willpaddle4food
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119 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
yea, that'd be nice and clean and free of duct tape. I wonder if you could ever get it back off if you wanted to use it for it's original purpose?
 

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"Just Read and Run Baby!"
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77 Posts
Can't you just shorten the leash a little so it doesn't extend all the way down to that junction? Alternatively, tape the leash in place so it can't slide.
 

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willpaddle4food
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119 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Dunno. Something violent seems to happen while I'm looking elsewhere. I think the oar shoots all the way back out and catches the loop no matter how short it is. I think that violence would tear the tape off too. But if it happens one more time there's going to be a pile of used carlisles for sale
 

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I feel your pain (pain in the ass, that is). I forgot how annoying it was after moving to cataracts with magnum blades. They don't have the skinny neck that carlisles do, which 100% solves the problem. I recently had to run a spare with a carlisle and it all came flooding back. It seems like carlisle would have figured out some sort of solution, like a cone-shaped plastic collar that tapers to avoid the abrupt transition that always hangs up the tether ring/loop. That's all I got. I'd suggest selling all those carlisles and getting different oars and blades. Worked for me.
 

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willpaddle4food
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119 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Yea, as I move into class 4 boating I am way less tolerant of the carlisles. Been waiting to get all my stupid oar-damaging moves out of my system. But I always have one more mystery move in my bag of stupid tricks.
I believe I'll keep the ones I have for creek oars, probably make my own plywood fiberglassed blades (WITHOUT NECKS) and use them for low water; so: none for sale yet. Hell, I pretty much have a junkyard for special needs carlisle oars at this point. Gonna abuse them and break them and step up to quality oars as fast as I can
 

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easy fix... and a few times mine have snagged on the Middle Fork of the Salmon, and i need to make a move.... it sucks

any home center. plumbing dept...or where the glues are sold. forget what its called... but its two part plumbers epoxy putty. one part white the other dark gray(i think)...you mix the two together till you have a uniform color... roll a piece of it...wrap it around that collar and the bevel it with your fingers( need to work quickly, it starts to set up fairly quickly,if i remember right)..i used enough to bevel it uniformly ( from the lip to nothing)about 3/4".. if that makes sense... now theres nothing to catch onto... i did my oar blades 8 years ago and its worked great...rock hard and waterproof... bomber! happy boating....
 

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Jared
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733 Posts
The cheap Sawyers do it to, I run the Phantom tethers with a big metal ring, it catches sometimes on that neck, but I can typically get it unhooked with a little jerk. I love the Phantoms.
 

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willpaddle4food
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119 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Good suggestions. Because I'm rigging for a trip that leaves in 36 hours, I took one of those stupid pool noodles (foam tube), cut off two inch chunks, and electrical taped it to the pencil-necked geek blade. Not a lasting solution. I like the two part epoxy idea. This is what the buzz should be: multiple suggestions for common problems. Like, I still have time to get the epoxy and do it on a layover day, and I gots a plan B with electrical tape, too. I think I may eventually try to rope wrap it for the simple reason I have extra epoxy and rope. I'll try to take pictures of what I come up with. Because I have already come very close to throwing all my carlisles in the river already (thanks, mtrafter: good idea and it was my first one, and it may be my final one, too.) Man. I was screaming in rage on Sunday and what I screamed was: "This is NEVER going to happen again!" One way or another, it ain't, to me anyway. I had the problem solved right there: Cut the damn tether and throw that thing in the river. And then throw the other one in, and the spare.
 

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Good suggestions. Because I'm rigging for a trip that leaves in 36 hours, I took one of those stupid pool noodles (foam tube), cut off two inch chunks, and electrical taped it to the pencil-necked geek blade. Not a lasting solution. I like the two part epoxy idea. This is what the buzz should be: multiple suggestions for common problems. Like, I still have time to get the epoxy and do it on a layover day, and I gots a plan B with electrical tape, too. I think I may eventually try to rope wrap it for the simple reason I have extra epoxy and rope. I'll try to take pictures of what I come up with. Because I have already come very close to throwing all my carlisles in the river already (thanks, mtrafter: good idea and it was my first one, and it may be my final one, too.) Man. I was screaming in rage on Sunday and what I screamed was: "This is NEVER going to happen again!" One way or another, it ain't, to me anyway. I had the problem solved right there: Cut the damn tether and throw that thing in the river. And then throw the other one in, and the spare.
No need for litter, just throw them in my yard!
 

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I believe I'll keep the ones I have for creek oars, probably make my own plywood fiberglassed blades (WITHOUT NECKS) and use them for low water; so: none for sale yet. Hell, I pretty much have a junkyard for special needs carlisle oars at this point. Gonna abuse them and break them and step up to quality oars as fast as I can
I used to have Cataracts with solid fir blades, ash edges, and glassed tips. They were too heavy with the non-counterweighted Cataracts. Cataract and Carlisle blades are a lot lighter weight.

Typical wood blades (Sawyer/Smoker/Gull) are attached to wood oar shafts...that counterweight the blade...square tops especially.

At least they floated neutral and the blades floated if I dropped the handles. They were just HEAVY when lifted into the air.
any home center. plumbing dept...or where the glues are sold. forget what its called... but its two part plumbers epoxy putty. one part white the other dark gray(i think)...you mix the two together till you have a uniform color... roll a piece of it...wrap it around that collar and the bevel it with your fingers( need to work quickly, it starts to set up fairly quickly,if i remember right)..i used enough to bevel it uniformly ( from the lip to nothing)about 3/4".. if that makes sense... now theres nothing to catch onto... i did my oar blades 8 years ago and its worked great...rock hard and waterproof... bomber! happy boating....
JB Weld? I've seen similar stuff at the contractors desk at the hardware store with a variety of stuff stuck into it--nails, screws, bolts, golf tees. Rough up the face of the Carlisle where the putty will go with some 60-grit so the epoxy putty sticks well.
 
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