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I have had really good luck cooking things like brisket or pot roast on the Camp Chef dome setup with my P/S stove. I think what makes it work is I put thick slices of onion on the bottom of the DO to elevate the brisket off the bottom and use Dr Pepper plus other flavor enhancements to do a long time cook of the meat. In fact the stove plus dome setup, for me at least, is much easier than using charcoal when it comes to heat control over a long time span. On layover day, a brisket cooked this way is a good treat for dinner.

Baking cakes with the dome setup has been a lot harder for me. The problem is getting the high temps required to bake without burning the bottom of the cake or bread. There is probably a tip out there to get the higher heat with out burning if some one has this figured out. Maybe a thicker metal plate ? or a plate inside the DO to elevate the cake batter off the direct bottom of the DO. All feedback is appreciated.
 

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I have had really good luck cooking things like brisket or pot roast on the Camp Chef dome setup with my P/S stove. I think what makes it work is I put thick slices of onion on the bottom of the DO to elevate the brisket off the bottom and use Dr Pepper plus other flavor enhancements to do a long time cook of the meat. In fact the stove plus dome setup, for me at least, is much easier than using charcoal when it comes to heat control over a long time span. On layover day, a brisket cooked this way is a good treat for dinner.

Baking cakes with the dome setup has been a lot harder for me. The problem is getting the high temps required to bake without burning the bottom of the cake or bread. There is probably a tip out there to get the higher heat with out burning if some one has this figured out. Maybe a thicker metal plate ? or a plate inside the DO to elevate the cake batter off the direct bottom of the DO. All feedback is appreciated.


To save weight, we skipped the Partner stove and just brought two Woodland stoves on a MFS trip this September (flying in post Ramshorn blowout). The Woodland stoves can be turned down quite a bit, but they get a little finicky and will go out or make soot if set too low. I brought a Camp Chef dutch oven dome and the diffuser that comes with: Black Dutch Oven Dome & Heat Diffuser Plate and More | Camp Chef

That diffuser plate really made it possible to cook with lower flame levels on the power stove and not have a hot spot in the middle (and not have the stove go out). It would be pretty easy to make one with some cold-rolled steel plate if you don't want to spring for the Camp Chef option(maybe something a bit more compact like Primus one for your survival gear Outdoor & Survival Gear - GritrOutdoors.com ). I think it would be key to drill some holes in it if you go that route. The dome thing is pretty cool though, especially if there's a fire-ban in place and you want to bake something in a DO.
Probably something like a wire rack inside to elevate it a bit, should work just fine(also can if you have a couple of those you can cool your cake on the other one).
 

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I have had really good luck cooking things like brisket or pot roast on the Camp Chef dome setup with my P/S stove. I think what makes it work is I put thick slices of onion on the bottom of the DO to elevate the brisket off the bottom and use Dr Pepper plus other flavor enhancements to do a long time cook of the meat. In fact the stove plus dome setup, for me at least, is much easier than using charcoal when it comes to heat control over a long time span. On layover day, a brisket cooked this way is a good treat for dinner.

Baking cakes with the dome setup has been a lot harder for me. The problem is getting the high temps required to bake without burning the bottom of the cake or bread. There is probably a tip out there to get the higher heat with out burning if some one has this figured out. Maybe a thicker metal plate ? or a plate inside the DO to elevate the cake batter off the direct bottom of the DO. All feedback is appreciated.
I've baked many things using a backpacker pantry's heat diffuser. The diffuser has about 1/2" metal lifter ring above the plate (no holes in plate) that separates the pan from the diffuser. Works
 

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You can just order copper plate online - easy to find ‘right thickness’ by researching heat diffusers and looking at specs.

Just remember to cut to correct size and drill holes prior to using - allegedly it gets stronger after high heat / oxidation.
 

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The issue with the welding sparker is that in some cases there's clearance issues with some stoves/devices. These arc lighters have peeked my interest.
I've got that exact model for my propane grill at home. It's worked perfectly so far, and I only have to charge it 1-2 times a year. Not sure how well it would do with sand, dirt, and water of river life.
I got a crack pipe lighter from the smoke shop for my camping setup. Refillable, and it never gives me grief. I refuse to buy the disposable long neck lighters anymore. I've had too many die on me 3/4 full of butane.
 

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You can just order copper plate online - easy to find ‘right thickness’ by researching heat diffusers and looking at specs.

Just remember to cut to correct size and drill holes prior to using - allegedly it gets stronger after high heat / oxidation.
Copper conducts heat way better than steel, but it's heavy, pretty soft, and would likely be expensive. Probably would work great though.

Looks like you can buy the Camp Chef plate separately if you'd like. Probably cheaper in $ and time that making one, unless you do a lot of metal work and have the scrap. The legs for larger DOs fit into the divots.
Lots of other options as well like this: https://www.amazon.com/Paderno-World-Cuisine-A1739021-Diffuser/dp/B0007T25ZC

Might be nice to have a couple of diffusers under a griddle. I elevate my griddle with two pieces of aluminum angle, but still get hot spots. Combining the elevation and diffuser might really help with that. Has anybody tried it?
 

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Copper conducts heat way better than steel, but it's heavy, pretty soft, and would likely be expensive. Probably would work great though.
Yeah, definitely going to be much more expensive. Also copper in general is much softer so you would risk denting it, as well as copper tends to get patina in my experience, hence extra work to clean it up. Not really worth for camping setup in my opinion.
 

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For years, I used nothing but the sparker that metal workers use to ignite acetylene torches. Durable, cheap, and utterly reliable -- as long as you remember to bring a small box of the replacement tips to screw on when the one in use finally grinds down.
I'm with RichP. The welder's sparker thingy - no burned hair on the back of your hand, no plastic, refillable flints, simple, no gas to deal with, and just one of them will last you a lifetime.
I keep a welding sparker tied to my stove. Works well even in the wind.
View attachment 83020
On the plus side, these are very inexpensive: $3-4 and will actually throw sparks a few inches, so you don't have to be right on top of the burner.
 

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A few years ago I bought some piezo electric lighters with a flexible braided steel extension about 10 inches long. Worked awesome. Just looked for them again and can’t fine em. They were less than ten bucks if memory serves. Mine ended up in the TL’s kitchen box on a MS trip so I’m looking for another. A long extension is nice especially for lighting a blaster.
Here you are, at $4 ea.;
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Ok...got one of those arc rechargeable arc lighters and I'm sold. Wind resistant, rechargeable and super reliable to ignite.
 
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