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Discussion Starter #1
I want to preface this thread I have started with the fact that I have never been a fan of these frameless boats with a glued on pin/pad oar lock systems that many anglers are buying now a days with the intention to float rivers. I wouldn't put my life in the hands of one of these systems as I don't trust it but that's me.



I'm wondering if we can put our collective brains together to figure out a way to make the frameless pad/pin oar lock "system" safer for the average fisherman who may buy these boats and float rivers. Instead of complaining about it and calling every person that buys these boats (over something with a safer, sturdier frame) with the intention to drift rivers an idiot and becoming an antagonist, I've accepted the fact that I can not change the fact guys are buying these for their light weight and portability to drift rivers and so I'm wondering if we can collectively come up with a way to make them safer in the event of pad breakage where the oar could get lost and there is no way to effectively replace the oar as the pad is toast which make the boat a one winged chicken essentially. I'm trying to dream up a solution - maybe a D-ring above it with a loosely fitted tether that could be tightened down if the pin/pad breaks and sort of act like an oar lock to at least get to shore or navigate a bit. Any thoughts?



Here is an example: OSG Stealth Pro | Outcast Sporting Gear



There is also several boats in the Dave Scadden line up and the WAtermaster line up with this style of glued on pin/pad oar lock system.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I do want to acknowledge that these things aren't falling apart - many are floating class 1-2 rivers often with little issue - just that there is no redundancy if something does happen and I'm wondering if there is a way to offer a way to mitigate for this


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Frameless Boats

I've heard that they won't let you into heaven if you die in a frameless boat. You approach the pearly gates and she sends down the lower level.
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And since I'm in propaganda mode: They make inflatables to support the air pressure intrinsic to their nature. Inflatables with two exceptions are made of fabric which lacks strength other than tension. Thwarts are introduced to prevent the inflatable from collapsing on itself when stimulated by a lateral load. Thwarts are adequate for this purpose; Remove the thwarts and one has a problem.
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A frames is....should be... constructed to maintain form. A cat frame is one example of such. Frames are chassis designed to maintain form, carry and distribute load, transmit thrust and hold the user contents secure when inverted. The frame is the second most important component next to the occupant. The bladder holding the air is just that; the inflatable. However, the folks making the bladders have done a wonderful sales job portraying the sport revolving around them. Not so says the physicist, The art is archaic. Archimedes wrote the book on it.
 

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I only fix I can see.....is to glue on a new one. Some of these boats are so thin in material that you would have to glue a large patch on, after you remove the broken oar lock from the boat.

Maybe you could come up with a break down paddle with a strap-on oar lock attached to it. You could strap it around the tube as one unit.

The other way might be to strap a spare paddle to the back of the boat and R1 your way to the take out. On some of the boats I've seen, the weak point is the hole drilled through the middle of the oar, thus the oar breaks in half. i don't think I've ever seen one of these boats with a spare oar or paddle strapped to it.

In the lake fishing world you have these awesome trolling motor set ups with remote foot switch and GPS tracking. Maybe you could design a rear tube mount for a remote controlled trolling motor and foot switch. :cool:
 

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Misspellingintothefuture!
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Carrying a paddle along seems about the best solution to me. Like a go cart on the highway....
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Shap that's an interesting idea. I'm thinking that as oar strokes are taken the metal will lightly rock or deform the tubes slightly where the metal edges over time could dig in - wondering if thick chafe strips would be warranted between the metal and tube. Or a pad of some sort that is replaceable? Thoughts?


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I had something in mind like Shapp. My experience with this sort of thing is on sweep boats on the MFS. We used truck mud flaps to protect the boat, and used 4 3" d-rings to attach. There's some flex, but not so much that you can't move a 10 (15?) thousand pound boat around.

On the other hand, it does leave you with a pretty substantial solid part to haul around. Maybe that defeats the purpose of not having to have a frame to haul around??
 

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Shapp
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Yes, but for a small 1 person "frame less" boat, the oar saddle could be a lot smaller in size I bet. Regarding chafing, it would be easy to get a piece of neoprene and glue on the bottom to protect the tube. There is also a bunch of nice thin minicell foam sheets with sticky stuff on the back you could easily attach.
 
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