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Caw! Caw!
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone,

My 4.25 gallon galvanized chickie pails have started to leak. There are no holes in them; they leak (really slowly) out the seams, because the clear sealant stuff they put in them at the factory has gotten brittle.

I'm wondering if anyone knows of something I can use to re-seal them? It would have to be something that can withstand heat, because I use a blaster to heat dish water.

I could just use them as they are. The leaks are pretty slow. But if it's easy to seal them up again, I'd rather do that.

Thanks!
 

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Caw! Caw!
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Discussion Starter #3
Heh. Cool idea, thanks. I turned off my TV for good a few years ago, so I had forgotten about that stuff.

I looked it up, and once it's cured, it's good to 350 degrees. That will definitely work, unless I space out and boil my dish water dry. It's also purportedly food grade*, so there's a greater likelihood of getting sick from "mystery meat dutch oven surprise" than from the sealant in the chickie pails.

*Except, of course, in California.
 

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Definite maybe
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I might try Sika flex. It's polyurethane and about the toughest sealant I've ever used. You will not be able to remove it once it hardens. Don't get it on you hands, it takes about a week to remove.
 

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A couple other options might be a bead from a welder around the seam, would want to have Lots of fresh air with the Galvy burning off, and need to hit them with fresh galvy from a spray can afterwards. Might be tricky with the thin metal, but I have pulled off welding some thin stuff before, and I am a beginner, so could work.
The red high heat silicone would also probably do it, I believe you can find a food grade version on Amazon.
 

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On second thought, scrap the welding idea, I think it would be a pain in the ass, solder would be better if you went that route, or go with a sealant.
 

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On second thought, scrap the welding idea, I think it would be a pain in the ass, solder would be better if you went that route, or go with a sealant.
Split the difference maybe and do some bronze braze?

I'd love a river solution for this. Ceiba gave us a bucket that was basically useless and it would have been great to field fix it. Only thing I can really think of is to bring the stuff with you to fix it. I usually bring a Bernzomatic blow torch, so could maybe do some soldering.
 

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Caverdan and others have posted a pretty easy field fix that doesn't involve potentially burning the hell out of yourself or totally ruining a bucket. High heat silicone. Throw a tube in your repair kit and you're set. Lighter and easier than carrying around a bunch of bronze or silver.
 

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Split the difference maybe and do some bronze braze?

I'd love a river solution for this. Ceiba gave us a bucket that was basically useless and it would have been great to field fix it. Only thing I can really think of is to bring the stuff with you to fix it. I usually bring a Bernzomatic blow torch, so could maybe do some soldering.
Caverdan and others have posted a pretty easy field fix that doesn't involve potentially burning the hell out of yourself or totally ruining a bucket. High heat silicone. Throw a tube in your repair kit and you're set. Lighter and easier than carrying around a bunch of bronze or silver.
^^^

I was going to say the same thing.

I'd probably be one of the first people to try brazing/soldering a leaky bucket at home. On the river, stick to silicone and enjoy your trip.


It doesn't even need to be high-temperature silicone.


Anecdote: when I was about 10 (~35 years ago) my dad bought a brand-new Riley Stove. Riley Stoves are kind of the horse-packers' equivalent of a Partner Steel stove. He wanted the water tank, but Mr. Riley didn't have any completed, so Riley grabbed one right off the press and caulked all the seams with regular clear silicone RTV...and that thing hasn't leaked in 35 years, including multiple times being boiled dry.
From the Dow website:
Dow Corning 732 Multi*purpose Sealant remains flexible for continuous use up to 400°F (204°C) and intermittent use up to 450°F (232°C)
 

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Caw! Caw!
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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for all the replies, everyone.

I didn't mention this in the original post, but this is for an "at home" fix. I think I'll go with the silicone. It's easier than soldering or brazing, and I don't need to get any equipment to do it. I can't justify getting into a brazing set up, just to fix some buckets.
 

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The blaster is pretty hard on chickie pails. On the river stir in a small handful of clean sand. The sand settles to the bottom and will often plug a small leak.
 
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