Mountain Buzz banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,045 Posts
What kind of kayak?

What class of water?

Can your dog swim?

Does your dog actively like water?

I would definitely get a dog PFD, most whitewater kayaks have no real place for a dog to ride safely. Sea kayaks have a bigger deck but I still would not make my dog balance on those for very long. While I have seen dogs ride on kayak for short distances, and my sisters golden is very happy sitting in the cockpit of one while on the water, I guess I do not see many ways for a dog to "enjoy" kayaking. Most people I know that have river dogs host them on larger crafts like a raft or cat. Maybe I am just missing your intention?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I have a recreational kayak with a large cockpit and we are going on a shallow flatwater creek. Charlie can swim but he's not a real water dog like a lab.

What kind of kayak?

What class of water?

Can your dog swim?

Does your dog actively like water?

I would definitely get a dog PFD, most whitewater kayaks have no real place for a dog to ride safely. Sea kayaks have a bigger deck but I still would not make my dog balance on those for very long. While I have seen dogs ride on kayak for short distances, and my sisters golden is very happy sitting in the cockpit of one while on the water, I guess I do not see many ways for a dog to "enjoy" kayaking. Most people I know that have river dogs host them on larger crafts like a raft or cat. Maybe I am just missing your intention?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Either rent or buy an inflatable kayak(make sure you pets nails are clipped/trim), even with a large cockpit you may not have room. As KF said it can make it uncomfy for the dog and your self if you need to adjust. And dog pfd is also essential, you never know what may come up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,959 Posts
I'd get him a PFD and tow him behind in a small K-Mart raft for the type of river your talking about.........or upgrade to an inflatable like Kendo suggests. The PFD is Key for a Happy Puppy. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
676 Posts
you could do like some of the idiots i've seen on our rivers here in CO: make your dog swim/walk/run the entire reach you're running. no kidding i've seen this multiple times. i almost nailed some couple's golden retriever last summer when running shuttle on the poudre because they were making him swim while they paddled. he had to run up to the road to get around some obstacle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
485 Posts
Mrs. oarframe and I took our dog (when she was a wee pup) kayakin a few times, each with its own hillarious outcome.
1) On a sit-on-top at the local lake, tooling around dog resting peacfully on back deck - until we passed a flock of ducks. To this point dog has not seen a duck and promptly jumps off the boat to go investigate.
2) Floating down Black Cnyn (below hoover dam ) with friends. Dog resting peacfully between Mrs Oraframes legs in the S-O-T until said friend paddles by in his canoe with his own dog. Ours decides to go check out the other dog, again jumping out of boat to swim over to the canoe (whos occupants become very nervous when little dog tries to climb in canoe and bigger dog gets defensive). (Un)fortunately the canoe did not swamp.

Each time the method of rescue was a strong arm hand-o-god manuver to fish the pup back into the boat.

The years have gone by and the pup now weighs north of 70lb, and is restricted to dry-land pursuits.

Moral of the story - get a raft, a good cfd and small dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,449 Posts
I second the small dog, raft sentiment.

I canoed with a large dog ONE time and once they are out of the boat you are out of luck. I was unable to drag our 100lb pup back into the canoe which he was trying to climb back into as well. Luckily I had a second paddler so she held his collar and prevented him from capsizing us while I paddled back to shore.

Stay close to shore at first until you get to see if your dog will stay put.

Now we raft and it is easy to pull the dog back in because I can stand up and get some leverage to get the dog back in the boat - it's kinda hard to get much leverage in a canoe or kayak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
404 Posts
you could do like some of the idiots i've seen on our rivers here in CO: make your dog swim/walk/run the entire reach you're running. no kidding i've seen this multiple times. i almost nailed some couple's golden retriever last summer when running shuttle on the poudre because they were making him swim while they paddled. he had to run up to the road to get around some obstacle.
Maybe your dog just sucks. I take mine all the time down the river. Mainly on runs that are not roadside though. Only a few runs are suitable. Shoshone is perfect for the dog to just run alongside the river. A few others are good too like pumphouse and upper C. A lot of rivers are not suitable because of busy roads next to the river. My dog loves running down the bikepath at Shoshone while we kayak. SUP'ing flatwater is good with the dog on the board as well, but SUP'ing rapids are tough with the dog on the board.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
I've kayaked Waterton canyon while my wife and dog followed along.
The BEST way to boat with a dog is to use an open canoe. We take our dog along all the time in our Mad River Explorer where the dog can sit between the bow and stern paddlers.
 

·
Renaissance Redneck
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
Lots of Durango old timers used to run our dogs along the town run in the 90s. Dogs would stay on the county side of the river (no leash) There are paths under all the bridges so that they dont have to cross any roads. The dogs would hang around the play spots and play together. Probably a different scene now though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
428 Posts
There's a few guys down here that still kayak with their dogs on town run, but not many.

I took my dog to Lake Powell last year and towed him across the lake in a ducky attached to my sea kayak. It worked fine, but don't expect to get anywhere fast.
 

·
Kjirsten
Joined
·
1,483 Posts
One thing that hasn't been mentioned. Whatever craft you choose, do not keep your dog on a leash. It is an entrapment hazard should he fall or jump in the water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Just a thought me and my dog about 50 pounds Kayak with a tomcat or duckie all the time a life vest is a must!! He likes to swim the rapids most the time sits right behind me and loves the ride
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Maybe your dog just sucks. I take mine all the time down the river. Mainly on runs that are not roadside though. Only a few runs are suitable. Shoshone is perfect for the dog to just run alongside the river. A few others are good too like pumphouse and upper C. A lot of rivers are not suitable because of busy roads next to the river. My dog loves running down the bikepath at Shoshone while we kayak. SUP'ing flatwater is good with the dog on the board as well, but SUP'ing rapids are tough with the dog on the board.
Letting your dog run wild seems lame to me. Especially in CO where it is ok to shoot a dog on your property (and DOW will shoot your dog if it is harassing wildlife). Furthermore, while your playing in a hole, your dog could get tatooed by a Buick running shuttle. While your dog may not suck, your responsibility as an owner does.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
If I had a monkey

(read paddling monkey) I don't know why I thought this was relevant to "kayaking with a dog" but, reading the whole website was good for a few laughs and made me forget I was at work for a couple of hours.
 

·
Kjirsten
Joined
·
1,483 Posts
If I had a monkey

(read paddling monkey) I don't know why I thought this was relevant to "kayaking with a dog" but, reading the whole website was good for a few laughs and made me forget I was at work for a couple of hours.
That site is hilarious. Someone has far too much time on their hands- fortunately for us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
494 Posts
Letting your dog run wild seems lame to me. Especially in CO where it is ok to shoot a dog on your property (and DOW will shoot your dog if it is harassing wildlife). Furthermore, while your playing in a hole, your dog could get tatooed by a Buick running shuttle. While your dog may not suck, your responsibility as an owner does.

I see no problem kayaking with your dog following you on shore and/or in the water. It is up to the owner to make sure it is a reasonable location. I haven't paddles the poudre but I understand that most of it is roadside. That may not be the best place. But on the Animas in D-town from lightner creek to 4-corners, it’s a fine place. I used to have my dog down there all the time. The important thing is to train your dog how to follow you without having to talk to your dog, whistle or other communication that makes the dog look like its yours. You will get a ticket at smelter if your dog is on the park side off of a leash. My old dog, and my new dog, follow me even if I don't call them. This way, when I am stopped by animal control I tell them I have no idea who's dog it is.

I also let me dog follow me at lower water on the Roaring Fork, Shoshone and the Glenwood Playpark. I don't think it is irresponsible at all to let my dog swim and play while I have fun. I even bring a bag for his crap (which is best disposed of in the back of your friends boat, or under the seat!!).

My thought is, if your dog can't swim and run and follow you, don't take it kayaking. If your dog can swim, run and follow you, go for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,607 Posts
Mrs. oarframe and I took our dog (when she was a wee pup) kayakin a few times, each with its own hillarious outcome.
1) On a sit-on-top at the local lake, tooling around dog resting peacfully on back deck - until we passed a flock of ducks. To this point dog has not seen a duck and promptly jumps off the boat to go investigate.
2) Floating down Black Cnyn (below hoover dam ) with friends. Dog resting peacfully between Mrs Oraframes legs in the S-O-T until said friend paddles by in his canoe with his own dog. Ours decides to go check out the other dog, again jumping out of boat to swim over to the canoe (whos occupants become very nervous when little dog tries to climb in canoe and bigger dog gets defensive). (Un)fortunately the canoe did not swamp.

Each time the method of rescue was a strong arm hand-o-god manuver to fish the pup back into the boat.

The years have gone by and the pup now weighs north of 70lb, and is restricted to dry-land pursuits.

Moral of the story - get a raft, a good cfd and small dog.
Good story, reminds me of when we went through "raft training" with our youngest golden Lila. She is VERY birdy, very anything-that-is-a-critter. First day - lake - raining - swallows EVERYWHERE. Had to run her down with the boat to drag her back in. Day 2 - lake - better prepared by bringing dog treats. Ducks and lots of waterfowl, lots of commands to stay in the boat, lots of treats and fun IN THE BOAT. Day 3 - flat river, Day 4 - flat river. Lots of land training also regarding ignoring other things, listening to us even when excited. To this day if we come upon any critters on the boat, we grab her pfd handle, just in case. She's not actually left the boat without permission, but it's been close.

On the other hand, one of the few times Hazel left the boat without permission, she had the most beautiful swan leap up in the air, out, and on top of a piece of tumbleweed. I think I broke the rule one more time on that trip to see it again.

On the raft is about the only time our dogs are "trained". Otherwise they are crazy unruly lick-your-face-off goldens. Since they don't know the safe swim technique, or how to avoid obstacles such as strainers, they stay on the boat.

It was a lot of work, but worth every minute. Especially because the time spent training Lila for the boat was also spent rehabilitating Hazel for the boat, she had gotten scared in a rapid the prior year, and left the boat in a bad place. That taught me to respect their individual boating limits, as much as any person who would not have fun in certain levels of water.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top