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Discussion Starter #1
Just did a self support and am curious what stow bags to get. I've got a set that is beat up and leaks a bit now. My problem is that they were a bitch to stuff behind the seat once full. It seems like it would be way easier to put the bag in empty and then stuff but just wasn't an option with mine.
 

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I like the Watershed floatbag/stow bag thing. A bit pricey and the heaviest float bags I've ever used (but we're still talking about only a pound or so difference).

I have more trouble trying to load the bag first into the boat and then filling the bag. Works better for me to load the bag full of gear, then cram it into the boat.

If I have the room, I'll throw my spare paddle under the float/stow bags to keep them off the bottom of the boat, so they're not sitting in water. Stays drier inside the bag then.
 

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I'll second the watershed bags. They will keep things dry! Which makes them a bargin for the price. Novel idea to stuff the bags while in the boat although I real can't see that working very well. When looking for a self support boat stern access is a top priority.
 

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Wildwasser AKA prijon makes heavy duty self support bags that are bomber.

they come in two sizes.

I got mine several years ago and not sure of the price now.

These bags are roll down top, hold a lot of stuff and are well made.

I also have one of the Water shed units and agree it is a great bag. The Wildwasser units hold more gear and are cheaper but just as well made.
 

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I've had good luck with the Wildwasser bags also. Never had anything get wet over about 4 years of use.

I know of some guys who've done a lot of self-support who swear by the lightweight polyurethane coated nylon bags like the ones made by OR. They are really slick so they slide into the boat easier and having a number of small bags makes packing easier over one or two pigs. I've never used 'em myself though.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the info, I'll save up and buy the watershed. The duffel they make was awesome to keep between my legs for essentials.

One more thing, do you guys use synthetic bags because they are warm when wet? Or do you go for down for the compression/warmth ratio. I used synthetic and it took a lot of space, just stuffing it into the drybag instead of in its compression bag.

Thanks a bunch
 

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I choose to use a down fill bag because of how small it compresses, lightweight, and warmth. But you have to be conscious of it, if it gets wet you are screwed. I use a granite gear drybag for it inside my watershed futa bag, the down fills are so compressible now that I can double up the dry bag protection and do not feel I am sacrificing too much weight or space. My 0 degree bag compacts smaller than a football, and my 30 degree bag is slightly larger than a softball - gotta luv 900 fill down and the new ultralight bags!

I have a buddy that just wraps his bag in a trash bag inside of his primary dry bag for the extra protection instead of another true dry bag and so far has not had any issues. Given the importance of staying warm on an overnight I have not been so daring.
 

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Lots of good info here, Earthen Exposure: self-support kayaking
I use a synthetic 30 degree bag,small therma-rest and a gore-tex bivy, generally enough being on the west coast and if I anticipate colder temps I'll bring a small poly pro blanket and sleep in the union suit. Works well here. For packing I just cram the bag down into the recesses of the watershed bag. My first trips I would put the bag in a plastic bag then the stern bag but I haven't had a leak so that practice has gone by the wayside. In the helpful hint dept.; Take the time to make sure the bag is sealed and 303 the rubber now & then to make it seal easy. Nick
 

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I like the wildwasser ones. We have a several in both sizes for the kids to use. WE also use NRS see stows non round bottom Medium or large. Pack the large about half full, then put it in the boat and cram it full and roll it up. Or use mediums and you can pack them and then slide in boat.

Just got my XP and it has spiffy bags for for the back were the opening is in the side facing up. makes it easy to load.

peter
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Lots of good info here, Earthen Exposure: self-support kayaking
I use a synthetic 30 degree bag,small therma-rest and a gore-tex bivy, generally enough being on the west coast and if I anticipate colder temps I'll bring a small poly pro blanket and sleep in the union suit. Works well here. For packing I just cram the bag down into the recesses of the watershed bag. My first trips I would put the bag in a plastic bag then the stern bag but I haven't had a leak so that practice has gone by the wayside. In the helpful hint dept.; Take the time to make sure the bag is sealed and 303 the rubber now & then to make it seal easy. Nick
Thats some great info from earthenexposure.com, thanks for the help!
 

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GaiaSports "Ultimate stow-floats"

Finally bought just one of these to try, and I think it is the bomb. Waterproof zipper instead of the bulky "rollover & clip-down" on the Watershed Futas. Much lighter, easier to stuff, too. Haven't gotten too many trips on it, but so far it's showing no signs of wear and is bone-dry. Had been looking at them for a while, and they were $129.95 apiece when I first saw them, so price has come down $40. Still $10 more than a Futa, but so far seem like a better idea. Only complaint I have is they are a little too long for most current creek boats, just like the Futas are. I think they need to be shorter and not have a taper at the stern, since most creek boats don't have the length or the taper anymore. Anyway, check out their website:
ultimate kayak stow float*::*stow floats*::*kayak*::*Gaia Sports
 

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Finally bought just one of these to try, and I think it is the bomb. Waterproof zipper instead of the bulky "rollover & clip-down" on the Watershed Futas. Much lighter, easier to stuff, too. Haven't gotten too many trips on it, but so far it's showing no signs of wear and is bone-dry. Had been looking at them for a while, and they were $129.95 apiece when I first saw them, so price has come down $40. Still $10 more than a Futa, but so far seem like a better idea. Only complaint I have is they are a little too long for most current creek boats, just like the Futas are. I think they need to be shorter and not have a taper at the stern, since most creek boats don't have the length or the taper anymore. Anyway, check out their website:
ultimate kayak stow float*::*stow floats*::*kayak*::*Gaia Sports

Nice, thanks for review. Been wondering about these as well and plan to pick one up.
 

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Finally bought just one of these to try, and I think it is the bomb. Waterproof zipper instead of the bulky "rollover & clip-down" on the Watershed Futas. Much lighter, easier to stuff, too. Haven't gotten too many trips on it, but so far it's showing no signs of wear and is bone-dry. Had been looking at them for a while, and they were $129.95 apiece when I first saw them, so price has come down $40. Still $10 more than a Futa, but so far seem like a better idea. Only complaint I have is they are a little too long for most current creek boats, just like the Futas are. I think they need to be shorter and not have a taper at the stern, since most creek boats don't have the length or the taper anymore. Anyway, check out their website:
ultimate kayak stow float*::*stow floats*::*kayak*::*Gaia Sports
That is a functional looking product! Thanks for the info.
 

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Yes, I had to move away from the front range to a place that actually had water in the rivers to float my fat ass down the river. I am actually friend of the shish kabob too.

Peter

ps really, I never lived in the front range like my friend Lief does.
 
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