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Thanks for taking the taboo out of it. Having a good back deck roll is a GOOD thing to have in your toolbox. Some may say it should never be taught, but they are wrong. There is a time and a place for everything- even the back deck roll. It's fast and get's you up or in an active brace quickly. Not a bad thing. It's not the right tool for shallow creeks and you shouldn't change from a different roll that is working the day you learn it. But, give it a try. If anything it will give you a reason to go to the pool this winter. Keep you elbows square with your shoulders if you have had shoulder issues in the past.
 

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Sweet video. I totally agree that it's great to see the back deck roll taboos being addressed. I would go a step further and say that it's frequently appropriate for creeking. I first started wondering about the backdeck roll when I noticed that the best boaters I paddled with were backdeck rolling almost all the time. I actually backdeck roll too often, but sometimes can't help it because it's become so automatic.

However, I can think of many times where it's saved my ass. One example is when I was boating with a way too large group down SSV (read: shallow, manky, steep creek). Not one, but 2 boaters in front of me got pinned and blocked the two channels that were options. I tried to boof the stern of one pinned boater (who may or may not have replied on this thread), and it instantly flipped me. I knew exactly where I was and saw a seriously dangerous rock beatdown coming my way, but I threw a backdeck roll, was underwater for only a split second, and didn't touch a thing. I remember a similar experience on Deer Creek on Bailey on the last part of the drop after the rock slide. I was not paying attention, got pushed against the side of the boof rock, it flipped me, and I backdeck rolled up instantly, touching nothing, and saving me from doing the last slide upside down.


Someone was talking about hits to the helmet, and I said I can't really remember the last time I took a hit to the helmet. I thought about it for a bit, and said, you know, every since I started backdeck rolling, I never hit my helmet. If I strike a rock underwater, I just push off it with my paddle and it rolls me up.

Anyway, I'm always surprised when I find class V boaters (or any boaters who know how to roll for that matter) who don't have this roll in their arsenal. It's not the end all be all of rolling, but I find valid uses for it all the time. Start paying attention to how many times you flip when you're on your back deck and how many times you flip when you're aggressively leaning forward. I bet you're on your backdeck at least 75% of the time.
 

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Great video. I've been trying to improve my bd roll and this is really helpful. I can pull it off in flat water but i have trouble being able to instinctually do this when I flip in whitewater and i'm on my back deck. Must be a mental thing. Some of my swims have come from flipping in this exposed position in shallow water and pulling my skirt because i didn't want to try to get to my normal roll position for fear of banging my face on the bottom. Any tips for how to make this a quick and natural way to getting back up when flipping in this position?

I think i pulled one off recently while in this position but it wasn't a conscious effort. Just sort of happened. Maybe i'm on the right track.
 

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Any tips for how to make this a quick and natural way to getting back up when flipping in this position?
For me it came together one winter while doing pool sessions. I was working on a bow stall and every time I'd flip over I would force myself to do a backdeck roll instead of a normal roll. When I got out on the water in the spring the roll was second nature - I did it without thinking about it.

In Portland you probably never have to subject yourself to pool sessions, but I'd say whenever you practice your roll in flatwater or while playboating (not that you would need to do that in Portland either), force yourself to backdeck roll and it will become automatic over time.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for watching everyone! Yes, it was shot during 2 of Lyle's pool sessions in the Golden Rec Center. Gnome, I'd focus your practice on making sure you get your head/blade up to the surface , then doing a really good hipsnap every time. Once you can your backdeck roll without really pulling on the paddle, you should be able to hit it every time and anywhere :) Enjoy!!!
Stephen
 

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Been trying to figure out this whole playboating thing. Right now, my kickflip attempts are pretty much back deck rolls off the crest of the wave. Is this the general idea or am I oversimplifying it a bit? Same scenario I am sure about keeping my "paddler's box" tight to save my shoulders but also looking for advice about how to try this in a safe way.
 

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My issue with learning the back deck has been real time application. I managed to get the technique early on but I never remember to use the damn thing when I get flipped. Halfway though setting up for a C2C I think, crap, that would have been a good time to do the back deck. My notion would be to intentionally use it more while surfing since that seems the best place to continually practice using the roll. Any other advice on getting it incorporated into paddling?
 

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Hey Stephen, nice video.

Any extra advice for off side? I think my hip snap is what gets discombobulated in all my off sides giving me usually a 50/50 on getting right. Maybe you've got sumthin extra to add...

Thanks!
Beth
 
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