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So this raft came with plywood floor panels that I've rigged up but it still seems a little shakey like I'm doing it wrong. Any input here? :confused:



 

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First off. Congrats on the new boat. I was looking at the pics in your other thread and there are D-rings in the corners on the outside of the boat. It looks like the previous owner intended to use all of the holes in the plywood for strapping it in place. There is even a hole lining up with the D ring on the thwart.
 

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If you strap it the way you are doing it.....you will rip the holes out of the plywood. What you need is a really long piece of webbing or rope. You feed the rope from a D ring.... down through a corrosponding hole.....run the rope under the ply.....and back up through the next hole. Go up to that corrosponding D ring above the hole......then run the rope back down through the same hole.......under the plywood to the next hole.....up again to the corrosponding D ring and back down again.....and run the rope under the plywood. Do this all the way around the board using all the D rings. The rope is what takes all the support of the wood between the holes.

Trust me....you will ruin your board if you strap it in like you have it shown. ;)
 

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Caverdan is correct, but take it one step further: buy a half dozen large (at least 3/4" or 7/8" diameter hole, which probably means 2" overall diameter) "fender" or flat washers and large (at least 1" diameter) rings from local hardware or nut and bolt supply store. Stainless is wonderful if you can find it, but plain old galvanized works fine as well (will eventually rust, but no big deal to sand and paint 'em first with rattle can). Use 1" tubular polyester (not nylon, it stretches when wet and has poor rot resistance) webbing and thread up through the hole in your floor board, through the washer, around the ring and back down through the washer and hole, continue through holes in a pattern that makes sense to suspend the board from available d-rings (or better, frame members). Hang cam/loop straps with buckles from D-rings or frame, thread the polyester tubing through them and cut (use hot knife or somehow sear ends so they don't ravel) to approximate length so you can adjust the height the floorboard hangs. This way you have adjustment to snug top of floorboard against inside diameter of tube(s), but it looks like your beaver board is not cut generously enough to accomplish this last step - it's going to have some sway in it no matter how you suspend it, but the above technique is river-tested for over 40 years and was the way we all hung our plywood floors "back in the day." (Took awhile to evolve the buckles and adjustment feature, but it's worth doing correctly). The HUGE advantage of this rings and washers technique is not only the adjustability it offers but the fact you can tie gear DOWN to the floor, which is always preferable to tying up to the D-rings or frame pieces (keeps whatever you're tying in from bouncing up and down).
If this isn't clear, PM me and I will take a picture of it on my floorboard. I'm a fan of HDPE over plywood for floorboards, but have run plywood floors for many decades with no issues - you just have to keep 'em smooth and sealed, whether with paint or spar varnish. Good luck!
 

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Caverdan is correct, but take it one step further: buy a half dozen large (at least 3/4" or 7/8" diameter hole, which probably means 2" overall diameter) "fender" or flat washers and large (at least 1" diameter) rings from local hardware or nut and bolt supply store. Stainless is wonderful if you can find it, but plain old galvanized works fine as well (will eventually rust, but no big deal to sand and paint 'em first with rattle can). Use 1" tubular polyester (not nylon, it stretches when wet and has poor rot resistance) webbing and thread up through the hole in your floor board, through the washer, around the ring and back down through the washer and hole, continue through holes in a pattern that makes sense to suspend the board from available d-rings (or better, frame members). Hang cam/loop straps with buckles from D-rings or frame, thread the polyester tubing through them and cut (use hot knife or somehow sear ends so they don't ravel) to approximate length so you can adjust the height the floorboard hangs. This way you have adjustment to snug top of floorboard against inside diameter of tube(s), but it looks like your beaver board is not cut generously enough to accomplish this last step - it's going to have some sway in it no matter how you suspend it, but the above technique is river-tested for over 40 years and was the way we all hung our plywood floors "back in the day." (Took awhile to evolve the buckles and adjustment feature, but it's worth doing correctly). The HUGE advantage of this rings and washers technique is not only the adjustability it offers but the fact you can tie gear DOWN to the floor, which is always preferable to tying up to the D-rings or frame pieces (keeps whatever you're tying in from bouncing up and down).
If this isn't clear, PM me and I will take a picture of it on my floorboard. I'm a fan of HDPE over plywood for floorboards, but have run plywood floors for many decades with no issues - you just have to keep 'em smooth and sealed, whether with paint or spar varnish. Good luck!
I don't know about the OP, but I'd love to see a picture. I'm not understanding what protects your tubes from rubbing/chaffing from the beavertail being pulled up under it?
 

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I'm at home, floorboard is at warehouse but I'll get a picture tomorrow. The edges of the plywood that come in contact with the tubes have a couple layers of gorilla tape on 'em, basically just wrapped the entire edge with gorilla tape two thicknesses thick. I had to cut darts where it went around corners, and used a little barge cement to help adhesion n some places, but it's held up for 4 years with about 50 river days on it so far, and leaves hardly any marks on the tubes (Aire SD Puma, so I'm not as concerned with rubbing as some might be with other construction). You can also pad the edges with ensolite or any thin flexible material, the advantage of having a floor wider than the inside of your tubes is that upside down it will hang up and not fall through. Ask me how I know...
I just ran an aluminum floor down the Grand and on a Cat trip, and again like HDPE (cutting board material, but get the marine UV-protected version used on boats and for docks and steps) way better. The floors I ran were both diamond plate, but you have to run 3/4 or 1 inch tubing underneath for rigidity/structure and they definitely leave black marks on just about any raft material. My frame is diamond plate, but new floor will be HDPE, which also comes in a skid-resistant version for decks and hatch covers. Expensive and heavy but can be worked with woodworking tools and never needs maintenance. You can drill more holes to lose some weight, but have to go to at least 5/8" thickness in HDPE if you are trying to span anything over 12 or so inches (again, ask how I know...). I'm currently running 1/2" in bottoms of drop bags (again, cut a bit longer than the inside width between my tubes) mostly to give shape to the bags and protect floor a bit. These sit directly on the floor both fore and aft and so far - about 20 days using these - absolutely no wear or marks on floor. HDPE comes from several different manufacturers, "MarinaBoard" is one brand name, easy to search for but harder to find the further you are located from the coasts. New floor likely will be 3/4" HDPE, suspended with washers and rings - I'll post pix.
 

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I'm going to argue that it is probably mostly OK as rigged. I'd add a couple more straps in the remaining holes but I've run something similar for 5 years with no problems. That is about 2-3 weeklong trips per year. of course I tend to pack relatively light.... But no signs of wear or tear on boats or the floor so far.
 

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I've run a similar floor set up for quite some time with no problems even with 6 gallon water jugs up front for extra weight. The other thing you could do to stabilize the floor would be to put a strap all the way around the thwart and through the rear center hole - basically pull the edge of the floor tight to thwart.
 

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I don't know about the OP, but I'd love to see a picture. I'm not understanding what protects your tubes from rubbing/chaffing from the beavertail being pulled up under it?
I think he means, use a washer to help reinforce the hole and distribute the weight.

The one unknown is board thickness. I run a skidgard floor similar in my rower compartment. By hanging the board as you have it will put the weight on a relatively narrow portion of wood. (between the hole and the edge.) Running the strap under the floor will distribute the weight better. If the floor is thick enough that it does not flex then it may be strong enough the way it is.

Hang it the way you have it will swing a bit and tilt if you stand on one side. If you lower it so that it is just in contact with the floor when you stand on it, it will not be as unstable.
 

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Can't figure out how to post pics, but can send if you PM me w/yr. email address. No, the washers don't reinforce the holes, they serve to stop the rings from rubbing directly against the floorboard and also provide adjustment for the webbing. TriBri1 is correct, if you put the board down on top of the floor it will be more stable, and also correct that if you run the strap under the floor you distribute the load better than if you use only an inch or two of whatever thickness of plywood to hang it...
 

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Can't figure out how to post pics, but can send if you PM me w/yr. email address. No, the washers don't reinforce the holes, they serve to stop the rings from rubbing directly against the floorboard and also provide adjustment for the webbing. TriBri1 is correct, if you put the board down on top of the floor it will be more stable, and also correct that if you run the strap under the floor you distribute the load better than if you use only an inch or two of whatever thickness of plywood to hang it...
PM sent
 

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Seems to me that unless you are running sharp heavy stuff like ammo cans or full kegs of beer, the floor offers a harder surface to pin the bottom of the boat against as opposed to a pile of dry bags directly on the floor.

Floors do have their place, but i see many boats running floors that only serve to make the bottom more susceptible to rock damage, not less as intended.
 

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Seems to me that unless you are running sharp heavy stuff like ammo cans or full kegs of beer, the floor offers a harder surface to pin the bottom of the boat against as opposed to a pile of dry bags directly on the floor.

Floors do have their place, but i see many boats running floors that only serve to make the bottom more susceptible to rock damage, not less as intended.
I was thinking it was a fishing rig and the floor board was a casting platform.
 

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I was thinking it was a fishing rig and the floor board was a casting platform.
I don't know if it matters, but I believe this is a bucket boat.
 

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Can't figure out how to post pics, but can send if you PM me w/yr. email address. No, the washers don't reinforce the holes, they serve to stop the rings from rubbing directly against the floorboard and also provide adjustment for the webbing. TriBri1 is correct, if you put the board down on top of the floor it will be more stable, and also correct that if you run the strap under the floor you distribute the load better than if you use only an inch or two of whatever thickness of plywood to hang it...
Pix received, but I don't have access to my flickr account till I get home in about 6 hours. I was hoping to see it rigged, but it does give a good look at rigging and tiedown options. Anybody else use Rok-straps for ammo cans? ROK Straps - The Ultimate Stretch Strap - HOME
 

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Rokstraps look like all Fastex (plastic) buckles, and I don`t think I`d trust èm to hold in event of collision with rock or over time with exposure to UV. There are metal side closure buckles, and that`s a different story, but I`d still look up the rated strength before trusting. Virtually all rafters use straps that have cam buckles with teeth (NRS, Cascade, DRE, etc.), failure is dependent on many factors but the better buckles (Ancra) will hold almost up to the breaking strength of 1 inch webbing, around 1000 pounds. Depends a lot on angle of pull (direction of stress) and other factors, but your 1 inch Ancra buckle is way stronger than the Fastex one, something like 800 pounds versus 150 (been a long time since I looked up the stats, but that should be ballpark for straight-line pull). Cascade and maybe other outfitters now sell Rollercam straps, which are a new genius buckle that is identical to Ancra in every way except incorporates a brass roller so that the teeth of the bite are always 90 degrees to the cam.
Straps are vital to secure your stuff. Invest in good buckles and cut the ends of the webbing that goes through èm on an angle, use a hot knife or iron and melt the webbing down to where it`s REALLY easy to feed through the buckle - will save you rigging time and frustration. The more fixed straps you can leave on your frame the less time you will spend getting on the water. Fastex or side closure buckles are really easy to adjust and rig, but generally lack the strength for rafting applications.
I was boating before straps - used to take FOREVER to tie everything down with ropes (solid braid nylon), and you only did that once before learning to wet your ropes before tying down. Good quality straps today don`t suffer from that stretch issue, but even the best polyester ones will elongate 5% or so when wet.
 

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What I had been hoping to see was the floor, wider than the narrowest space between the tubes, and pulled up tight against the underside. At least I think that's what you described?
 

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I've used ROK straps for years- for motorcycle touring. I wouldn't trust them to hold anything heavy on a raft. They're really not made for that- more a "better than a bungee" idea. They are all plastic buckles- and beneath the woven portion is a section of flat natural rubber that lets you put a duffel under tension easily on a bike.
 
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