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I just did this recently and it is easy. I recommend you have a new or like new 1/4" punch for making clean cuts through the fabric.

First locate the seat where you think it should be. Which, is probably near the center of the boat for stability, driving and spinning ability, and to offset gear weight if added to the stern. You're location will also take into account the leg room of the usual occupant.

Second, adjust the foot pegs to their center setting on the slide bars. That way you will have room to accommodate different size occupants and/or some relocation of the seat position if ever desired (perhaps to better balance for gear weight in the stern or heavier/lighter or taller/shorter persons). Then, with the usual occupant sitting in the boat solidly back in the seat have the person position their legs with knees bent and flared outward in a suitable boating position. Then locate the foot brace brackets against the bottom of the feet and at the height on the foot desired. Use a sharpie to mark the outer edges of the brackets on the tubes. Measure how far inward the bolt hole is on the bracket and then measure and mark that location on the tubes. You can then use the long material with three holes in it from the kit to assist with locating and marking the other two holes for each bracket. Go slow to go fast and make sure you have the desired locations properly marked with round sharpie marks on the tubes.

Next, deflate the tubes and unzip them open. Push the bladder out of the way to allow for a short 2"x4" wood block to be laid on the inside of the open tube behind where you will be punching each foot brace mounting hole. Again, go slow and give attention to the protection of the bladders and care of the outer tube fabric.

One hole at a time, with the wood block inside the tube, you will fold the tube fabric over the block and hammer your punch through from the outside of the fabric at your sharpie hole locations. Try to get a good clean (level) punch through the fabric at each hole. Then assemble per the instructions.

Do one side at a time. Measure and re-measure as you go to make certain you are confident in your process. It I not hard and is quite easy to do. You should be very happy with your results.

Happy boating!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ken, thanks for the instructions. I will get a punch as the instructions mentioned using an exacto knife, but that doesn't seem like a solid plan to me. I agree, a clean hole punch seems key. Is there any reason to put some type of waterproofing at the hole site? Does just tightening and the washers combine to keep water out?
Thanks again.
-Murky
 

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Ken, thanks for the instructions. I will get a punch as the instructions mentioned using an exacto knife, but that doesn't seem like a solid plan to me. I agree, a clean hole punch seems key. Is there any reason to put some type of waterproofing at the hole site? Does just tightening and the washers combine to keep water out?
Thanks again.
-Murky
We don't know yet. I did not add any, and my wife hasn't used the boat yet. I guess we'll find out. I figure I can open up the tubes to dry them out and then add sealer later if needed. A clean hole punch may be sufficient to prevent leakage, ... hopefully.

Cheers!
 

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Ken pretty much has it down pat. Emphasis on the measure twice punch once. The only thing I add when I do them professionally is another layer of material glued inside the boat just for support and tear resistance. The water that gets in the holes will be no more than the water that gets in the zippers. Open and dry your AIRE boats often!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Excellent, thanks for all of the tips. We unzip our boats after every trip as it was recommended by the guy we bought them from. I never thought about the water through the zippers being equivelant though, so I feel much better about it. I am buying a punch tomorrow and will get to work on it.
-Murky
 

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I would definitely second what Zack said about adding a second layer, and AIRE gives you the long hot-dog shaped piece (the "punching block) which works perfect for this purpose. Use a plastic meat cutting board for punching. Ken's guidelines are all excellent too.

The AIRE instructions don't really tell you to install a second layer, but in my mind a prime reason for adding footpegs to a boat in the first place is to have a brace when you go over larger vertical drops. And if a 200 pound paddler puts 2 G-force's worth of torque on them at the bottom of a drop, having those bolt holes tear is more likely if you don't have the extra layer.
On AIRE's Lynx I, there is already a piece welded in with three tick marks for the hole punch, but other models don't have these. Not sure which kayaks you have?
One time I found a whole set of punches from 1/8" up to 3/4" at a flea market for about $20, but often you end up paying more than that for just one at True Value or Homeboy Depot, so if you have time check Ebay or Amazon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have a Tomcat and Strike boat. Are you saying that you just leave the plastic hot dog shaped piece on the inside of the skin and bolt through it? I will see if anyone has put together a video as well.
-Murky
 

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Hi M.D.-

No, what Zack and I were saying is to actually glue in the second layer to beef up the hull before you punch the holes through. You don't have to, and if your paddling is mostly easier class II and III without big drops, then just going through the hull without a reinforcing patch may be okay. Then again, trying to repair damage around the bolt holes down the road would be a nuisance, so sometimes prevention is the best policy.
 

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Wow! just reading the above posts tires me out.Just carve out a foam block to size or wrap foam around 6"plastic piping and press that into place inbetween the sides where your feet stretch to or use any other easy to do brace. Cutting into a new inflatable, no matter how carefully you do it just doesn't seem right. I've used the foam block for years to great advantage. In the old days AIRE used to sell a made to purpose foam wedge that you just wedged into the front but apparently they don't any more.
 

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Ask your nurse or doctor friends for a biopsy punch.
 

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Why not just put in a float bag like the Force has or an inflatable thwart for your feet. The plastic foot pegs seem like a lot of hassle for a less than ideal brace...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
ImageUploadedByMountain Buzz1405456417.039562.jpg
Just under an hour for both boats. Feels solid. Thanks for the tips. We'll see what the Poudre has to say about it this weekend!
-Murky


Sent from my iPhone using Mountain Buzz
 

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I just outfitted my new Lynx with two of Sotar's inflatable seats...one as a seat and another in the bow as a foot rest. It works pretty well.

It doesn't fit perfectly, but it fits well enough. I am a little bit concerned with how it may impact my ability to punch holes, but we're talking about a ducky here...the best ducky isn't great at punching holes anyway.
 
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