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Before getting rid of the 16, keep in mind that a lightly-loaded 16 will feel more nimble than a heavily-loaded smaller boat. It sits higher on the water, spins on a dime, and accelerates quickly. The downside of that is more wind resistance, less momentum, and a bit flippier (but not always).
 

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I can't justify owning more than 1 raft right now (blasphemy I know!) as I don't live close enough to a river to get out for afternoon or 1/2 day trips, so won't do a lot of day trips, and I can realistically only do a few longer trips a year due to permits and logistics. I sold my 14' Solar a few years ago, and while that boat was basically a perfect size for most anything, I'm going to get a 16 footer for multi day trips and will rent if I need a smaller boat for smaller rivers/day trips. I could get a small fun boat for day trips and rent a bigger boat for multi-day trips, but I like setting up my frame and gear to make it easy to both row and rig all the gear on long trips. Some of the multi-day rigs I've rented rowed like crap, or they weren't set up well for a fast rig. Although I'm picky about what I boat on day trips too (and crappy boats can rule out running harder rivers), I can live with the paddle rafts or simple oar frame boats I can rent for most of those day trips. For me, right now, setting up my perfect multi-day boat is the way to go! So, I say if you can justify (and afford) more than one boat, yeah, do that, but if not get the boat you'll use most or that will make you happiest and rent for the other trips when that boat won't be ideal.
 

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There's no wrong decision when considering a 14' or 16' boat. You ay as well buy them both, see what you like, call it "rent" and sell the other. Someday you'll have a 12' and an 18' boat to keep them company. If you stick with the downriver game, (is there an upriver game?) you may someday find yourself spitting off a cliff and following with a boat of some kind.
 

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Seems to me that, rather than buying more boats as you are learning or taking a loss on your new boat in order to buy a smaller one, it might be more prudent to invest in rowing school next spring. I have just come off a 45 year hiatus from river running due to medical reasons and I also just completed a 5 day rowing class on the Rogue. Best 1600 dollars I ever spent. I can guarantee that, if you take the right rowing class, you will be able to row and navigate safely and effectively on Class III+ water. You will want the 16' for multi-day as everyone has already stated. And I think you will lose money selling a brand new boat just to buy another one. Learn to row the boat and it won't be a problem. BTW, I was on a 14' for my rowing school and it took me 2.5 days to get to where I was able to feel "right" again. Honestly, I relearned rowing and I have been disabled with spinal surgeries for 36 yrs.
 

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Seems to me that, rather than buying more boats as you are learning or taking a loss on your new boat in order to buy a smaller one, it might be more prudent to invest in rowing school next spring. I have just come off a 45 year hiatus from river running due to medical reasons and I also just completed a 5 day rowing class on the Rogue. Best 1600 dollars I ever spent. I can guarantee that, if you take the right rowing class, you will be able to row and navigate safely and effectively on Class III+ water. You will want the 16' for multi-day as everyone has already stated. And I think you will lose money selling a brand new boat just to buy another one. Learn to row the boat and it won't be a problem. BTW, I was on a 14' for my rowing school and it took me 2.5 days to get to where I was able to feel "right" again. Honestly, I relearned rowing and I have been disabled with spinal surgeries for 36 yrs.
PS.
I'm in the market for a boat, so if you really want to waste money by taking a loss on your new boat, look me up.
 

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OB Ranger has it right. If your skills are good, it doesn’t matter how big the boat is, you just try to ride the inside of the curve of the moving road that is the river. (Excepting some giant barge or sweep boat.). I have always thought that a rowing/oaring school would be cool and 1600 bucks sounds like bargain especially If you get to do class III plus as part of the deal. You have to either spend the money or like I pointed out way earlier in this thread, hang with competent boaters and watch and copy.
 
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