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Discussion Starter #1
So I have a Werner Sho-Gun 203cm bent shaft. It is a little long so I am planning on getting a 198 or 200, and switching back to a straight shaft. For me it seems like I get more power with a straight shaft, and where my hands are is were my blade lands in the water also my arms are lined up much better. Is it just me or do you tend to get more power out of a straight shaft.
 

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Power vs Ergonomics

More power, yes. But I found that when I switched to a bent shaft, the ergonomic placement of my hands made my wrists stop popping and decreased the late season irritation. The loss of power was worth it to me for decreased long term wear on my carpal and carpometacarpal joints
 

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Boof like a Utard.
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I've had both over the years. I'm wondering if you think it's actually a decrease in power or an increase in the weight of the paddle? That would reduce your overall stroke rate (I think). Just a theory. Thoughts?
 

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I think that what you really feel is an increase in the pressure that your hands exert on the shaft. With the bent shaft, more of the surface area out your palm makes contact with the shaft, so you get less pressure on any given part of your hand when you apply the same force with your wrist and arm.

It seems to me that the power should be the same, since that has more to do with your torso or your blades.
 

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GoBro
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I think your shaft flex and blade size and shape would be the main factors in power output.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well I am 6'4" with long arms so 203 is in the range. I seem to like a little shorter paddle. I think 200 or 197 would be where I would like to be. I may just have it cut down by werner. Maybe I would like the bent shaft better then. One thing I like about a straight shaft is the ability to choke up on the paddle without changing your grip.
 

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You shouldn't need to choke up, you want to keep a good solid box and keep elbows in so you don't dislocate a shoulder and plus it helps with proper paddling technique. Aka using your core.. Size it right the first time feel them all out.
 

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I went from a straight shaft player paddle to a at2 sl bent and ill never go back to a straight more power less strain on my shoulders and wrists love it im 6 foot and i went with a 197cm and fits me perfect!
 

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You just have to choose what works for you. Everyone's got their opinion. I used to use bentshafts and went back to straight when I had a highwater creeking day where I lost my bentshaft and had to paddle with a breakdown. I like not having to transition to a new paddle feel because if I ever need the breakdown, it is usually in the sh*t. I feel like the straight gives more power as well, and I don't have any wrist issues using it. I also like the werner fiberglass straight shaft as it isn't as harsh as carbon if you have a rock impact, and has a bit of flex too. 200 shogun straight FTW!
 

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I'd have to second what ACC says: switching from my primary bent-shaft AT to my Lightning 3-piece breakdown straightshaft is really tough to get used to. Losing your paddle does always happen in the sh*$, too, and that grip change can affect your stroke confidence.

But, that being said, I have all kinds of wrist problems from 15 years of raft guiding and 20 years of paddling, plus 2 construction accidents (left wrist fusion, loose tendons in both wrists, probably arthritis starting), and the bent-shaft paddles are so much more comfortable to paddle with. I feel like I get plenty of power with either the AT or a Shogun (have had both), and in fact feel like I get better power with a bent-shaft in most circumstances. The ortho doc that has worked on my wrists looked at one of each paddle I brought to his office (trying to have a brace fashioned for left wrist), and he said unequivocally that the bent-shaft alignment is a lot better for preventing tendon injuries along the little-finger side of the wrist. That is what I've noticed most: less fatigue and pain on the half of the wrist away from the thumb, more than anything.

What really needs to happen is that Werner, AT, and Lightning need to start making high-quality 3- and 4-piece bent-shaft breakdowns, solve the switchover problem. :cool:
 

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Cpt. No Scout
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I use a strieght shaft, been bent and back. My feeling is that bend shafts are for gearheads with too much time to think about stuff and more money than I have. Yea bend shafts have the ergo thing going for them, but only when your in up right forward position. I don't know about you guys, but the angels between my wrist, elbows, sholders, back, and hips are constintly changing. How anyone could say that a bend shaft accounts for all the miss alignment issues I face while kayaking is completely insane. I don't have any wrist or shoulder issues that can be solved my throwing down extra moneys for a bent..
 

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I don't know about you guys, but the angels between my wrist, elbows, sholders, back, and hips are constintly changing. ..
Maybe it's the "angels" that live in your body and are constantly changing that help you with paddling discomfort..... where can I hire some? :p
Slight difference between "angels" and "angles".....
 

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Bent all the way here. Try different brands. I love mine, but others I have tried not so much. I'm sure a lot of it is just what you get used to.
 

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Wrist pain

I paddled straight for years and years, and finally switched over due to wrist pain.

I put it off as long as possible due to price, weight, and the break-down paddles always being straight shafts.

My wrist pain has gone away since I switched over to the bent shaft, though I also don't paddle as many days a year.

I do love paddling stuff that is continuous and difficult for me, and I also love paddling things like Cataract Canyon with all the flatwater. It was actually 2 back to back Cat trips that caused the wrist pain to start in the first place.

I do debate about going back to a straight shaft, as the length I like and the spot on the Werner shaft where the hands go aren't exactly matched up. Close enough to work though.
 

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I switched to the bent shaft years ago because it helped the tendinitis in my elbows when paddling every day. I don't notice less power or really understand how that would be an effect. I'm not too concerned with the break-down issue because I have a bent shaft lendal breakdown and because I paddled for years with a straight shaft and I figure I can do it again if necessary.

I use a 194 bent shaft sidekick. Kind of a unusual choice for someone who mainly creeks and runs rivers, but if feels right; and as Al said, that is the point.
 

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Idaho floater that's has to be the worst theory I have ever heard. I know ergonomic is a big word for you I don't expect you to look it up in a dictionary but seriously? For true purchase on your blade you don't white knuckle it you just hold it. If you are white knuckling, your blade can't do what it's designed to do as efficiently.. And yes the box is always moving but the structure is still there. I don't expect you to even know what a box is or the purpose of it.
 

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Caspermike nailed it. Idahofloater maybe those angels can help you with spelling and punctuation as well.
 
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