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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for tips on installing Hypalon patches. I've watched NRS' videos and last summer I replaced a patch on my raft using NRS Hypalon material and the Clifton Hypalon Adhesive (I didn't use the accelerator) and my question is was what's the easiest way to apply the adhesive? When I opened the bottle that stuff was like thick molasses and super hard to apply in thin coats and I could barely get it off the applicator at times? Any tips would be greatly appreciated, also explain it to me like I'm a child, lol!
Thanks
 

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The glue should be pretty easy to work with. Maybe you have old glue. A dremmel works well to rough up the area as well. It's all in the prep to get a good patch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The glue should be pretty easy to work with. Maybe you have old glue. A dremmel works well to rough up the area as well. It's all in the prep to get a good patch.
The glue was brand new from a boat shop in town, and out of curiosity I checked my buddies repair kit he bought from NRS and the glue was the same consistency.
 

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Obey River Rat
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The glue was brand new from a boat shop in town, and out of curiosity I checked my buddies repair kit he bought from NRS and the glue was the same consistency.
The glue has about a 1 year shelf life. New glue is easy to spread in thin coats. If its more like molasses, I suspect it has been on the shelf a long time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The glue has about a 1 year shelf life. New glue is easy to spread in thin coats. If its more like molasses, I suspect it has been on the shelf a long time.
Ok thanks. Must have been an outdated one, frustrating because I remember him showing me that had outdated jars that were discounted
 

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I've used 4-5 year old glue quite successfully IF the container hasn't been opened... if your glue is too thick, before tossing it, thin 1 part toluene (toluol) to 5 parts glue and mix thoroughly. Try a test piece - you should have old scraps of waste fabric somewhere. If 1:5 is still too thick, try 2:5, etc. I've mixed glue up to just about 50/50 and had it work.

Also pay attention to storage. If your glue freezes it may be still salvageable depending how cold it went, how long, etc. Prolonged very cold (say a week below 10-15 F) and it's gone... freeze/thaw cycle does the same thing. Way hot, like left in vehicle or exposed ammo can in the desert in summer can cook it as well. It will likely tolerate heat up to about 140 F better than cold, but then needs to be used.

Most folks who don't use adhesives frequently will follow the instructions on the product and/or do internet search. That's a good start, but with hypalon/PVC/uretheane glues thinner is better than thick and several thin coats (I use minimum 3 for D-rings, up to 5 very thin coats tricky "must stick, no do-overs" stuff). By thin the glue should flow off your brush - the consistency should be more syrup than cream...

Once it's applied and patch is down, think activation with heat gun or lacking any other source, a small pot containing water heated to boiling (by the time you get the pot onto the patch the water should have cooled down a few degrees, somewhere around 190-200 F is fine). Heat gun is low setting and hold it far enough away from the patch that temp stays in the low 200's range. You can estimate temperatures in the 180-220 range with practice but an IR temperature gun is $30-50 from a number of sources, including Garbage Freight and Slamazon... Keep the heat on for 1-5 minutes, longer and lower is better than fast and hot. Proper application and activation and you achieve a bond that's as strong as heat welded. Avons (and others) were entirely "cold-glued" together in the manufacturing process - the use of heat for activation is still considered a "cold" process.

There are several on this forum - yardsells, zbaird, and others I don't recall offhand - who know a lot more about adhesives and today's techniques and materails than I do. (My experience goes back to the 70's and 80's but I mostly quit sniffin' glue then until taking it up again in the last several years - strictly to fix my own and friends' boats, not as a profession). All have contributed lots of advice and tips in the last few years, and someone more technologically adept than me could go through various threads and cull the posts into one new one. A rule of thumb might be just about anyone should be able to do an adequate job of attaching a D-ring following the NRS/AIRE and other videos/instructions. Replacing valve boots is an order of magnitude more difficult than applying a simple patch. And with Tear-Aid and other products that weren't around 30-40 years ago (TyVek tape, gaffer's and rigger's tapes, etc.), if you have an on-river puncture that's not too major you should be able to apply a fix and at least get to the take-out.

If you run multi-days, good idea to know how to patch stuff. Or make sure someone on your trip does... And for complicated stuff - I won't even try to fix blown baffles in I-beam floors, for instance - that's where zbaird comes in. Feel like I've contributed as much as I know over the last few years, so won't respond to these questions from now on. Think if you search this forum for "patching" and/or "glue" you will find all you need to know.
 
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