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I have two questions about patching...advice would be super helpful.

1. We have the hyside repair kit which comes with the appropriate patch material BUT it’s got a silky fabric on one side. Do I peel this off before patching, or is this a part of the material? Photos below.

2. The instructions are very specific about humidity - 55% or below. We live in Seattle where the humidity this time of year hovers right around 60% and is rarely below 55%. Do you think this just extends the drying/curing time or will it mess the whole process up?
I’m patching three small holes sustained on the MFS and am heading back there in two weeks so we don’t have time to get it professionally patched. Otherwise, I think I’d definitely go that route.

In doing a practice run, the fumes are no joke! I started out using an n95 mask but it’s not nearly enough protection. Definitely requires a fan and respirator even with good ventilation.
Thanks for the advice! -darcy
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I'm not getting into the patch issues but will say that the N95 mask is useless against organic vapors. The N95 is for particulates only and using it for fumes is like trying to filter a fart with a piece of window screen. If you really want to filter the fumes, go to the hardware store and ask for an organic vapor respirator. It'll be spendy but hey, my brain's my second favorite organ....
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I'm not getting into the patch issues but will say that the N95 mask is useless against organic vapors. The N95 is for particulates only and using it for fumes is like trying to filter a fart with a piece of window screen. If you really want to filter the fumes, go to the hardware store and ask for an organic vapor respirator. It'll be spendy but hey, my brain's my second favorite organ....
I figured that out pretty quickly.
 

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Looks to me like the material is from the end of the roll. Blue side up. They are not peal and stick so silky side down. Personally if I was going to send it to someone to repair after your next trip, I would patch the holes with tear aide and save the prep and sanding for them.
 

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And you can definitely patch @ 60% relative humidity - or more. Otherwise no boats back east would ever get fixed...
Just try to do it inside, between 60 and 80 degrees, and allow time for patch to cure. Inflate soft, just to shape (about 0.5 psi for those who insist on gauges), let dry 24 hours, a little harder, 24 hours, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The "silky" is what you call the scrim and is the base fabric of your material. Cut it off and discard it.
Are you sure? It isn’t sturdy like scrim seems to be. It’s like silkscreen material and lifts off during the sanding prep. I know you’re way more experienced but it seems weird to me.
 

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And you can definitely patch @ 60% relative humidity - or more. Otherwise no boats back east would ever get fixed...
Just try to do it inside, between 60 and 80 degrees, and allow time for patch to cure. Inflate soft, just to shape (about 0.5 psi for those who insist on gauges), let dry 24 hours, a little harder, 24 hours, etc.
I agree with all this except for the inflate to soft. I want my boat totally deflated when I am patching to make sure my patch is going on flat, and then I put significant weight on the patch. I prefer sand in a dry bag for weight. Here in CO I let them sit for 24h, with Seattle humidity I'd just let them sit longer.

Patching is all about prep. Take your time stenciling, cutting, sanding, and cleaning. Use a good brush and get your glue coats down thinly and evenly. Make your patches roundish and bigger than necessary. NRS has good instructional videos.
 
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