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I'm running cataract canyon in a 13' boat. Expecting 12k CFS.
What are some tips to keep from flipping?
So far I've heard: keep the tubes and floor a little loose, pack extra weight and put it down low.
I have one paddler with me- should they be highsiding like crazy? Using a paddle to dig into waves?
Is it a good idea to rig pre-fixed flip lines to the bottom of the boat, or is that more of a liability?
 

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Don't soften the tubes too much. Tight is right.

Rig heavy, with lots of beer and full water jugs.

Square up. Keep it straight and avoid holes that will back surf or stall your boat.

Flip lines are unnecessary on an oar rig, more of hassle and chance of a line coming out an getting tangled up. Just use a rope from another raft and about four people to flip it back over in a calm spot.

Square up, a 13 ft. raft can take on some meaty waves.
 

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Hard tubes, soft(ish) floor to hold some water in the boat

Rig heavy stuff forward and low. Extra body should just be low front weight to punch waves.

Square up and take your lumps.

You'll be fine.
 

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I have flipped my share and I think tight is always better. I also always have 2 pre-rigged flip lines to make it easier to flip back over. I can't speak to having a passenger paddling, but can attest to squaring up and trying to keep good forward momentum. either way, flipping isn't too big a deal if you rig well. Good luck and have fun.
 

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I agree with weight, and a paddler up front to dig into anything large. It helps a lot pulling you through. T up obviously, and use as much speed as possible. Loose floor, stiff tubes you don't want to taco.
 

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Run a strap underneath the boat width ways from the laces, if you flip you can grab it and pull yourself up on the boat.
 

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Don't soften the tubes too much. Tight is right.

Rig heavy, with lots of beer and full water jugs.

Square up. Keep it straight and avoid holes that will back surf or stall your boat.

Flip lines are unnecessary on an oar rig, more of hassle and chance of a line coming out an getting tangled up. Just use a rope from another raft and about four people to flip it back over in a calm spot.

Square up, a 13 ft. raft can take on some meaty waves.
I have not found flip lines to be a hassle at all. (One more thing to dry out at the end of each trip is the big "hassle.") Nor have I ever had one come out and get tangled. Sure, there is a theoretical risk, but there is that risk for the lines on my bow, my stern, and my rescue throw bag.
 

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Spider has it right. Get a good paddler up front. Well timed hard digging on the high side and high point of a wave can do a lot for staying right side up. I run a line through the floor length ways on each side of the boat. Then you can use them to climb up grab one and pull the boat over. Make damn sure all swimmers are clear in case an oar is still in the lock/pin.


Jim
 

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I'm running cataract canyon in a 13' boat. Expecting 12k CFS.
What are some tips to keep from flipping?
So far I've heard: keep the tubes and floor a little loose, pack extra weight and put it down lore of a liability?
Myself, Id do like a Dutchman,I'd never go loose on my tubes,tight is right,you can really feel your rigs responce (I own 3 cats, go heavy,,, And LOOK were your going,a lot of times you'll have a sec or two, to make that move and miss most of a hole,All my boats chairs sit high, and my towers are tall cause I row standing alot so I can see real well, and I do cataract once or twice a year(last year only once) now I'm doing fall more often sept early and late sept.
 
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