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3 is correct.
125 Icy-tek & 2-54 Igloo Marine's
The Igloos are for beverages only, so the big cooler only gets opened once or twice a day.
It holds ice for a week+ no problem. But the Igloos are only really good for 3+ days. Re-stock ice at The B or Five Mile Bar
Plan is to upgrade them all to homemade foam n fiberglass....maybe this winter.
 

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My partner and I can load 15 people’s worth of gear on our 2 boats in 30 mins. There seems to be an issue.
I don't doubt it. The rabbits in the big gear boats do it all the time...

My gear pile changes size and shape every month (sometimes more often depending on who is on the trip and how often I can get out) but generally has the same configuration. Day one is the longest, but usually I can hit put in and be on the river in about an hour when I am loading for 4 or 5.
 

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My wife and I back the boat down to the water, I push it off the trailer and place it in the most reasonable open spot out of the way. We then unload all of our prepacked gear and move it in front of our beached boat. I park the truck and come back - then I stand in or at the side of the boat and she hands me gear as I ask for it (nicely).

When we bring our young kids and dog, my wife will run interference with them while I grab gear off the beach and load myself.

We're usually on the river in about 30-45 minutes* even with kids. The only time it takes longer is when we're with others who aren't such a well oiled machine. But that just gives us time to pop a beer open while we help others.

But this system wasn't developed in one trip. We used to get in arguments because she didn't like being told what to do, but she learned that in rafting sometimes you simply need to do what is being asked. Conversely, I had to learn how to communicate and ask for things in a constructive manner. Fights were as much my fault for being snippy or short out of frustration... it would snowball.

The biggest issue with our ramp routine is probably just my angst trying not to mess up backing up the empty trailer.

Been rafting together for 10+ years, 6 years with our own rafts - we still talk and strategize our ramp routine. We might be especially sensitive to it because we live in the front range and feel the pressure of mountain folk/local guides judging us.
 

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Do you mean rigging at home or daily during the trip? First, rigging at home a couple hours to pack the food and get everything out and into the boat. At the put in I finalize in the parking lot on the trailer then launch the whole shebang spending a couple minutes on the ramp at most. During the trip it takes me about 20 minutes once I have the gear down at the beach. I am often kitchen boat so I often am waiting on the table that covers my drop bag and other kitchen gear. But ultimately yeah 20 minutes. I don’t load shit in my stern, everything has dedicated straps on the frame. I will load my stern if I must, but usually don’t. Cheers.
 

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45 minutes with a deflated raft, wife and kid in tow. Practice rigging on your yard. If it takes you three hours to rig while you and the mrs argue that would be the last trip we went on together.
 

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My wife and I are both ex river guides and we have just one boat. This has made rigging pretty contentious sometimes haha. So I know where you’re coming from. Our rig is pretty dialed in after many years so everything has its place, and this makes it easier nowadays. If your teenager has a disability and cannot help I understand, but if not, they should be hustling the fuck to help. I would make them lift and carry all the heavy things haha. Hang in there and your system will get smoother the more trips you do. Also, you did not mention whether you have a trailer. If you do not, do. Peace man.
 

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My goal is to be off the launch ramp in less than three minutes. Everything is pre-loaded and pre-rigged in the boat before it even leaves the garage. Once launched, we might spend 15 minutes topping off the boat and rigging up fishing rods. On my last Middle Fork Trip, at the take out, we had the boat out of the water and tied to the trailer in under 90 seconds. When I finally get my electric winch installed, I think I can get that down to under 60 seconds.
Exactly!
 

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My spouse and I get into these crazy heated arguments, usually at the launch ramp, about how long it takes to load and unload our raft. And, why rafting is not that relaxing because it takes so much effort to get out on the river or lake. We can't "pre-load" the raft as our utility trailer is not set up for a good dunk and our van is only front wheel drive so if we couldn't get enough traction (wet, muddy or sandy) things would get ugly fast.

We have a 16ft raft with frame that is decent at accommodating 2 adults, 1 teenager (she watches the pups at the launch- not able to be a physical helper), and 2 medium size (40+ lb) pups- if set up with a "plan". We are desert rats so we freeze easily (aka- large sleeping bags, the tent is a necessity, warm clothes, etc). We tend to hang a lot of dry bags off of the sides (which prevents the dogs from falling out), and strategically set up for pups to walk around a bit. I admit we bring a lot of cargo, but if we didn't 40-60% of the occupants would be too much too deal with. Because we are newer to rafting we also tend to bring our motor with just in case (for winds or injury or when we leave 3 freaking hrs later than anticipated!!), which also requires set up time. We usually go for one to three nights and can't seem to spend less than 2-3 hrs loading the dang raft. At least 90% of the bags, coolers, dry box, etc. are set up prior to the launch ramp so really it is a lot of moving (from inside the raft on the trailer, under the raft, in the van), strapping the bags (we only do Class I-II), and leveling the pup areas. (Call me anal retentive, but I have also made up a diagram of where things should go on the raft so that my spouse and I don't get into another argument and also the raft than is mostly balanced.)

Is this a normal timeframe?

Does anyone do anything differently when they bring their family with to make things easier? Are there any sort of attachments to make things easier? (I bought the NRS drop bag which we use for our 7 gallon waters in the middle bay, and we have the NRS Raft Cargo Platform- which I can't figure out where to use since our raft is so full). Although sometimes I dream about it ...leaving my family at home is not an option. I appreciate any sort of advice because I am really starting to dislike my happy place ...the river.

Thank you ahead of time for your insight and experience!
Buy submersible tailights, I use a 16ft snowmobile trailer with a elevated crank winch stand I had built, get sealed bearings then you can stab that trailer as deep as you want. if you pull out slow without spinning tires front wheel drive shouldn't be a issue. You could actually build two 5ft ribbed plywood tire runs so then you wouldn't spin on sand (always leave them in the rig). Derigging a boat at the ramp sucks, I haven't broke a boat for 25 plus years, boat out of the water in 5-10 minutes, take another 20 minutes to rig for highway up in the turnout and away you go. My wife loves this as everybody is kinda whupped after getting off the river and stripping a boat when it is hot just makes it worse. I've been running a 18ft full gear boat on a trailer for ever. It is nice also at the put-in because the boat is ready to go, stab it in, park the rig for the shuttle folks and get gone. I also leave my boat rigged year around, just load dog, ice, beer, groceries and go. The kitchen, the johnny, sleeping gear, chairs are already rigged for the next trip. If your taking more than 20-30 minutes to jump on or off, rethink how if the boat is rigged fully loaded at home it simplifies getting in and out way faster. Good luck.
 
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