Mountain Buzz banner
61 - 80 of 112 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,931 Posts
Hey @thegoodpuppies, you got some really constructive advice (not all of it fun) and you took it in stride. I hope you feel less stress on subsequent trips and everything gets more and more amazing for you.

I'd love to live in your world, but a few days ago I left my spouse at the launch ramp while getting gas for the motor and came back to them chilling out drinking a beer enjoying the river! Apparently, they know how to live and I somehow have my priorities screwed up!
Hey, looks like they took the next step before you--get with their program!! That's awesome. Sounds like you picked a good spouse--you can shift your own priorities a lot quicker than you can shift a spouse! haha
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
I'd love to live in your world, but a few days ago I left my spouse at the launch ramp while getting gas for the motor and came back to them chilling out drinking a beer enjoying the river! Apparently, they know how to live and I somehow have my priorities screwed up!
This wasn't something she did the first year of boating, it took a couple seasons and both of us acknowledging what works and what doesn't. Our first year, I'd considered it a great rigging session if I was left alone and she was enjoying a beer by river. I just wanted her to have fun and enjoy the river, and I actually enjoy the process of rigging, so I was happy being left to my own devices. Eventually, she started to come over to try and help (mostly to see if we could get on the water more quickly), at first this was hard because she didn't know the system I had come up with to rig by myself. My strap-bag comment was an actual technique, she wanted to partake in the process so I'd give her busy work while I did my thing. This slowly evolved into her handing me cargo and learning the order of how things are loaded (funny sidebar - she learned a good lesson on how to pack when she asked for her rain jacket that was packed at the bottom of her overnight bag, which was buried at the bottom of the gear pile), then helping strap things down, then her rigging the front bays where she spends most of the time, to finally surprising the hell out of me and getting the boat on the water without me there.

Long story short, be patient and make sure your family is having fun (what's the point if everyone is grumpy?). Learn to love the problem solving and creativity that rigging can require, look at how other people load and rig, keep asking questions especially when boating with other people, and make sure to enjoy a beer or three while rigging up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Patience is paramount.
Don't sweat the petty things(.......)
Last morning on an 8 day Main Salmon Trip(our 11th total multi-day boating together) I barked at the girlfriend when she tried handing me camp chairs(which go on last), before anything else.
I expected that she'd know the order that things got loaded by then, but she didn't.
We all have different expectations. I shouldn't have been short with her, but she probably could have paid more attention to the process.

She ended up getting drunk that day, culminated in her standing in the hallway of a nice hotel, buck nekked, hollering after me when I went out to feed my dog. 😄

Still makes me chuckle...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
302 Posts
My goal is to be off the launch ramp in less than three minutes. Everything is pre-loaded and pre-rigged in the boat before it even leaves the garage. Once launched, we might spend 15 minutes topping off the boat and rigging up fishing rods. On my last Middle Fork Trip, at the take out, we had the boat out of the water and tied to the trailer in under 90 seconds. When I finally get my electric winch installed, I think I can get that down to under 60 seconds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
792 Posts
Iam a little late to the party but as a new boater and a father of two I can relate and I suck at organization so... I have the absolute privilege of boating with three girls and two really dumb dogs. Iam also the only gear head and I get super fussy about my stuff and fussy about where it goes. So I gotta do a whole lot to make them care and I gotta do all the pre travel work, row and most of the heavy lifting. My girls do their own gear and sleep stuff but that's about it. After pissing and moaning and being butthurt that the girls weren't hardcore senders I decided that it's on me to just not care. I get it all ready and I leave early but otherwise it is what it is and I'd rather my wife walk a dog and my kid throw rocks at stuff than be all bent outa shape my rigs not rockn on time. Helps to breath and if you yell at your wife at the put in she may snub your advancements at lay over camp (and even longer) just sayn. Here's a before and after gear pile for a seven day trip at home. I do a pile for each system; sleep, camp, emergency cook ect ect. I give the girls a small dry duffle for themselves and I do everything else. After I do my piles I do a check list and a shopping list. Go shopping check the list as it goes into boxes and get everything in piles in the truck where it goes on boat. Ie- ist box 2nd box , gear pile ect ect.. Then it's two boxes , cooler and a gear pile a few straps and we're off.i also leave the straps on the boat. If iam really stressed I just go a day early, wake up at 5am and load the boat with a headlamp. No anger no wtf, kids are fresh and takes less than a hour with parking. Wife gladly accepts advancements at camp and we all live happily ever after. Except the dogs who roll in shit.
Window Automotive tire Flooring Floor Living room
Property Window Interior design Flooring Floor
 

·
Registered
Classic (antique?) Maravia 14’
Joined
·
36 Posts
Lots of great suggestions for getting off the ramp quicker, but my question is “Who cares?” Our society loves to turn everything into a competition, but I’ve not seen any gold medals or extra testosterone awarded for short rigging time. The company I work for has joked for years that we’re the first on (the ramp) and last off. Does that make us worse boaters or mean we don’t have as much fun? I really don’t think so. Drop your gear out of the way and take your time rigging and enjoy the beautiful outdoors. It’s STILL better than working.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #71 ·
This wasn't something she did the first year of boating, it took a couple seasons and both of us acknowledging what works and what doesn't. Our first year, I'd considered it a great rigging session if I was left alone and she was enjoying a beer by river. I just wanted her to have fun and enjoy the river, and I actually enjoy the process of rigging, so I was happy being left to my own devices. Eventually, she started to come over to try and help (mostly to see if we could get on the water more quickly), at first this was hard because she didn't know the system I had come up with to rig by myself. My strap-bag comment was an actual technique, she wanted to partake in the process so I'd give her busy work while I did my thing. This slowly evolved into her handing me cargo and learning the order of how things are loaded (funny sidebar - she learned a good lesson on how to pack when she asked for her rain jacket that was packed at the bottom of her overnight bag, which was buried at the bottom of the gear pile), then helping strap things down, then her rigging the front bays where she spends most of the time, to finally surprising the hell out of me and getting the boat on the water without me there.

Long story short, be patient and make sure your family is having fun (what's the point if everyone is grumpy?). Learn to love the problem solving and creativity that rigging can require, look at how other people load and rig, keep asking questions especially when boating with other people, and make sure to enjoy a beer or three while rigging up.
Iam a little late to the party but as a new boater and a father of two I can relate and I suck at organization so... I have the absolute privilege of boating with three girls and two really dumb dogs. Iam also the only gear head and I get super fussy about my stuff and fussy about where it goes. So I gotta do a whole lot to make them care and I gotta do all the pre travel work, row and most of the heavy lifting. My girls do their own gear and sleep stuff but that's about it. After pissing and moaning and being butthurt that the girls weren't hardcore senders I decided that it's on me to just not care. I get it all ready and I leave early but otherwise it is what it is and I'd rather my wife walk a dog and my kid throw rocks at stuff than be all bent outa shape my rigs not rockn on time. Helps to breath and if you yell at your wife at the put in she may snub your advancements at lay over camp (and even longer) just sayn. Here's a before and after gear pile for a seven day trip at home. I do a pile for each system; sleep, camp, emergency cook ect ect. I give the girls a small dry duffle for themselves and I do everything else. After I do my piles I do a check list and a shopping list. Go shopping check the list as it goes into boxes and get everything in piles in the truck where it goes on boat. Ie- ist box 2nd box , gear pile ect ect.. Then it's two boxes , cooler and a gear pile a few straps and we're off.i also leave the straps on the boat. If iam really stressed I just go a day early, wake up at 5am and load the boat with a headlamp. No anger no wtf, kids are fresh and takes less than a hour with parking. Wife gladly accepts advancements at camp and we all live happily ever after. Except the dogs who roll in shit.
View attachment 70317 View attachment 70318
Thanks for the pictures! I can totally see order in the madness- referring to the top pic! Obviously the bottom is much more in check- maybe it's a perception thing. I swear I have twice the amount of your stuff!

I see a canoe barrel in the background...do you use that on your raft as a misc catch-all or a food-catch to prevent wild animals from nibbling through your bags? I contemplated buying one instead of a bear bags...do you like yours?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #72 ·
Lots of great suggestions for getting off the ramp quicker, but my question is “Who cares?” Our society loves to turn everything into a competition, but I’ve not seen any gold medals or extra testosterone awarded for short rigging time. The company I work for has joked for years that we’re the first on (the ramp) and last off. Does that make us worse boaters or mean we don’t have as much fun? I really don’t think so. Drop your gear out of the way and take your time rigging and enjoy the beautiful outdoors. It’s STILL better than working.
I agree to a point- my family is still novice in this whole rafting thing so we have to make sure we have enough time to get our butts out of a bind (losing crap, forgetting stuff, a hole in the boat, passing the intended campsite) before nightfall!

And, you are so right, I'll probably be back here next year asking "what do you do when you arrive early to your river campsite that is pressed into a canyon wall and there's no hiking available?" If I'm not physically moving, I start drifting off! Ironically, I was cruising around other Buzzer posts and ran into a book that I just "needed" to buy In Praise of Slowness: Challenging the Cult of Speed by Honore. Our society has definitely turned even beer drinking into a competition! IMHO- that just means less to drink later; at least later you can actually enjoy the rich flavors and serenity of the river!
 
  • Like
Reactions: MT4Runner

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #73 ·
This wasn't something she did the first year of boating, it took a couple seasons and both of us acknowledging what works and what doesn't. Our first year, I'd considered it a great rigging session if I was left alone and she was enjoying a beer by river. I just wanted her to have fun and enjoy the river, and I actually enjoy the process of rigging, so I was happy being left to my own devices. Eventually, she started to come over to try and help (mostly to see if we could get on the water more quickly), at first this was hard because she didn't know the system I had come up with to rig by myself. My strap-bag comment was an actual technique, she wanted to partake in the process so I'd give her busy work while I did my thing. This slowly evolved into her handing me cargo and learning the order of how things are loaded (funny sidebar - she learned a good lesson on how to pack when she asked for her rain jacket that was packed at the bottom of her overnight bag, which was buried at the bottom of the gear pile), then helping strap things down, then her rigging the front bays where she spends most of the time, to finally surprising the hell out of me and getting the boat on the water without me there.

Long story short, be patient and make sure your family is having fun (what's the point if everyone is grumpy?). Learn to love the problem solving and creativity that rigging can require, look at how other people load and rig, keep asking questions especially when boating with other people, and make sure to enjoy a beer or three while rigging up.
Thank you for the optimism! Five years of car camping and they still wait on me to point out where crap should go when loading the car or trailer 😭. I lurked at MountainBuzz posts for years trying to figure out (via the rigging porn posts) how people put all of their crap into 12, 14, 16 ft rubber boats... and still have room for the passengers. This perplexes me, but I'm pretty sure if I ever snapped a good photo many would say that I leave way too much empty space for the living objects (3 humans and 2 pups). I just want everyone to be comfortable. Hey, maybe I should get one of those Jorge Jetson mother-in-law pull behinds- that would solve some of my issues!
 
  • Like
Reactions: MT4Runner

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #74 ·
Patience is paramount.
Don't sweat the petty things(.......)
Last morning on an 8 day Main Salmon Trip(our 11th total multi-day boating together) I barked at the girlfriend when she tried handing me camp chairs(which go on last), before anything else.
I expected that she'd know the order that things got loaded by then, but she didn't.
We all have different expectations. I shouldn't have been short with her, but she probably could have paid more attention to the process.

She ended up getting drunk that day, culminated in her standing in the hallway of a nice hotel, buck nekked, hollering after me when I went out to feed my dog. 😄

Still makes me chuckle...
Slightly off topic, but you mentioned your dog. So when you bring your co-pilot(s) what do you bring for him/her/them? We do desert trips so I bring two raised dog cots to keep them off the ground from scorpions (one of mine eats everything that moves and the other likes her "home base"), two foldable soft beds for the tent because the humans get something comfortable at night, ~20 lbs of dog food, dog coats, and then two dog blankets because I'm freezing so they must be too; oops almost forgot the tennis balls!. I can't leave them home, not for flat floats, that is sac-religious! (Two of everything because we have two rescue pups- a Collie love child and a Shepherd love child that have gone on every trip with us.) It may seem like I spoil them, but my pups are there through thick and thin, plus they never argue back :) so I feel the need to take care of them!

Any thoughts on too much or too little for the pups' cargo?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Your dogs definitely have it better than mine! 😀
I have a pad for Reuben, and food. I've been contemplating getting him a little tent for inclimate weather, but he's happy to sleep on a pad by my pillow, most nights.
I quit taking tennis balls after he lost a couple, so it's just driftwood sticks for fetching fodder.
20# of food seems excessive. I just portion it out based on days we'll be gone, plus some for contingency. I keep it in a 3 gallon bucket with a gamma seal lid. His bowl gets used to rinse the sand out of my boat in the morning.

He's the best friend I've got. Has been on every overnight trip I've done, save for the high water MF\Main trip I did a few years ago.
Dog Water Vehicle Boats and boating--Equipment and supplies Carnivore

Oh, and his CFD. Although he typically doesn't wear it much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
792 Posts
Yep you gotta pack for everyone and pack everything they need lol. We have two waterproof thermorest looking dog bed deals. Think they where a Costco deal? They just get straped on top of stuff and dogs ride there then go on ground at camps. I did buy a few collapsible dog bowls for food and water and their foods in a big kittie litter style jug thing. Only thing that helps is leaving stuff behind lol and going light on clothes and "stuff". My little one has a giant art box that allways makes me go "huh" but she's a crafter doodler and so it goes lol. I feel ya it's a big job . So you just gotta get a head start and get up in the dark and get er done so your a hero! Canoe barrel has been deemed the "snack barrel" works good but definitely wouldn't stand a chance against bears. Like I said iam new and each time it gets easier. Now all the gear lives in the garage in "units" . I bet I could get ready in two days of after work for a big trip short of food. We even talk about deep freezing meals in spring so we can just load up and go short notice. Seems like the only permits are cancellation ones so better get good at short notice!! Keep on keeping on and she'll be right eventually and someday you'll be taking two boats lol!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Your post brings back memories for how we started doing this. Me, wife & kids (4, 5, 7) and without any rafting friends or family so on our own to figure it out. First trip was ruby horse thief & total shit show. 3+ hours to rig, fried tempers at 100+ degrees, skeeters to suck a fat man dry and stressed about making it to 1st night camp. Remember other rafters watching us and smiling. Few things we do to make it better:
  • Preassemble frame attached to trailer - pool noodles make great pads between trailer & frame. Pre-Attach Bimini and needed straps to frame where they go as much as possible
  • Dry bags pre-packed one for each person days before the trip
  • Drop bag for loose stuff
  • Minimize amount of loose stuff
  • Kids & wife assembly line gear from vehicle to beach that they can handle
  • I alone rig & one person hangs around to toss me stuff (can switch off). Kids play or eat lunch/snacks
  • Lower standards for perfectly balanced rigging if there are only class II or mild III for the first day. Throw crap in the boat, secure it with a net and get going. Nothing like being on the water to calm things down. Can fine tune the rigging the next morning with a lot less stress.
  • Find a good division of labor for on the river. Kids & wife lug, set up & take down tent and everything in it while I do the kitchen, cook & clean up. Nobody back seat drives.
  • Don’t bring every damn thing we own for contingency reasons. Bring what’s needed and make do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,931 Posts
Any thoughts on too much or too little for the pups' cargo?
My 12 year-old rescue Labs were Alaska pups. They lay outside on my deck in the snow when they get bored inside, so I don't really worry all that much about blankets for them.
...they sleep on the sand wherever...but I do notice they tend to cuddle against me on my PVC pad during the night.

Like BenSlaughter said, rations for the days you'll be out plus one day. Plus some joint treats and doggy aspirin since they tend to exert more on the river than at home.
Water Dog Plant Dog breed Carnivore


Plant Dog Working animal Natural landscape Tree


My little alarm systems alerted me to a bear in camp on Sat night!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #80 ·
Your dogs definitely have it better than mine! 😀
I have a pad for Reuben, and food. I've been contemplating getting him a little tent for inclimate weather, but he's happy to sleep on a pad by my pillow, most nights.
I quit taking tennis balls after he lost a couple, so it's just driftwood sticks for fetching fodder.
20# of food seems excessive. I just portion it out based on days we'll be gone, plus some for contingency. I keep it in a 3 gallon bucket with a gamma seal lid. His bowl gets used to rinse the sand out of my boat in the morning.

He's the best friend I've got. Has been on every overnight trip I've done, save for the high water MF\Main trip I did a few years ago. View attachment 70335
Oh, and his CFD. Although he typically doesn't wear it much.
Beautiful pup! Looks like Reuben is a comfy place :)! That's wonderful that you are able to take him with on your trips...I'm sure he greatly appreciates it; even if he is a bow ornament!

Sorry I should have clarified- I take a 20 gallon bug-proof food container and pack all of my two pups edible stuff in there: food, balls, pumpkin in case one has potty problems, rawhides, emergency kit for them, and a couple of small bags of treats.
 
61 - 80 of 112 Posts
Top