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Discussion Starter #1
i'm out of ideas for slowing the tide into my kingpin. i have tightened the screws, siliconed the screws, and tried a few different skirts. one dude i paddle with up here even tried wrapping a bike tube around the cockpit of his crazy 88 (still leaked). i don't even carry a sponge anymore. any solutions?
 

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Usually the leak occurs at the cockpit seal where the straps for the outfitting go thru the cockpit. Try removing the straps and caulking the slots or some people use an old inner tube and stretch it to fit around the cockpit.
 

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I have heard two reasons why Dagger has issues with leakage. Both of the reasons have nothing to do with the screw holes, although at one point the vast amount of screws holes in the Dagger boats most likely had something to do with this problem.

1- It is coming from the shape of the cockpit rim. If you look at the Dagger cockpit rim you will notice that the front rim area is higher than the hip area. It is this concave bow that impedes the skirt from adhering to the cockpit rim. I learned about this at the factory of one of the leading skirt manufacturers. Dagger was then called and brought aware of the situation, but they chose not to listen to somebody else's opinions that were backed by testing.

2- Then there is the other scenario that deals with the same problem (the shape of the cockpit rim) Only this time the explanation was that when the factory takes the boat out of the mold they have to pull it out like a plug. Dagger "use to" pull them out from the front part of the cockpit rim and in turn would pull the front rim up, which also gave the cockpit rim its seal problem.

So, you most likely have two choices in your "wet" Dagger issue. Just let it go, and get used to being wet. Or, buy a new boat. Sorry I couldn't give you the magical solution.

Mark Olson
 

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get a jackson.... That will end your problem once and for all.


Craw
Jackson Kayaks
 

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Another thought to keep water out of that Kingpin is the Super Size Me approach.

1. Rent "Super Size Me" watch and follow directions for 1 month, feel free to add Hostess cupcakes or ho-ho's to this regime. Also, no exercise during this time, no biking, boating, skiing or any other activity that may keep us from reaching our goal.
2. The additional weight on your sexy new body should help repel water in two ways helping keep the boat dry:
1. The new, larger you will take up more room in the boat not allowing for water to enter the boat. The tighter the seal the better, however remember to use some grease or lard on your body for an easier exit should you nead to swim.
2. We know that oil (fat) and water don't mix, therefore with the larger body mass primarily made of fat, water will be better repelled from your body and hence less water in the boat.

To summarize, larger body mass index = tighter seal and better water repellent.

Please keep in mind, your boat may ride a little lower than normal and you may notice more scrapings n the shallower waters, however you will be dry!!!!

PS. Hope things are well in the Great NW
Horn
 

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Discussion Starter #7
horn, i have already been working on the supersize approach, and have found that the drysuit you bought for me is beginning to fit like a speedo. i think i need to look at the positive side of a leaky boat. for instance, my boat may reek less from fear-induced urine and fecal matter. granted, i haven't sharted my boat since that magical giardia season of 2000, but i'm approaching 40 now, and it's sometimes hard to tell if i'm pissing myself or not. yeah, maybe i need to keep this boat...
 

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leaky kingpins

in addition to the above, my back band touches the underside of the rear skirt, which I think breaks the surface tension of the skirt. More water enters through capillary action through the backband. I've also duct taped the penitrations through the cockpit rim, in an attempt to reduce the same action through the backband webbing. After all of that, my boat still leaks way too much for extensive coldweather boating.
 

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I tried cutting the straps that go through the side of the cockpit rim. It didn't make a damn bit of difference. It also didn't make a difference in the outfitting either. Dagger designs great shapes. Then they proceed to ruin them by over outfitting. My buddy got one the 06 Kingpins and it still has all the same problems. It's heavy, it leaks, the outfitting sucks. My only advice is get a good sponge. I find that auto parts stores generally have the biggest, cheapest sponges.
 

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The best advice in this thread is probably to buy a new boat (and not a dagger).

However, a method I've seen work on other kayaks (but have yet to try on my own leaky kingpin) is to put several beads of silicone caulking around the underside of the cockpit combing (where the skirt's rand is supposed to contact the plastic, but doesn't). Build up the caulk so you eventually have rubber on caulk instead of rubber on air and maybe you can stay dry.

Of course, it's always good to get out and stretch.
 
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