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I have been looking at getting one of the bigger outfitter tents with a wood stove for my hunting trips with larger groups. So far Cabelas Alaknak 12x20' is the favorite, but all of the hunting tents I am looking at are too intensive to set up day afer day on a river trip.

While doing my research I came across an old thread on the buzz about floorless twnts with stoves here: http://www.mountainbuzz.com/forums/f15/floorless-tents-and-wood-stoves-rafters-need-to-get-on-board-40730-4.html

Since I will already have the stove I am thinking a second hot tent for river use might be in order. Being in the PNW I would prefer to have a floor because it is pretty much garuanteed there will be rain.

Does anyone have any suggestions for tents with floorsto use with a wood stove?

Kyle
 

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Shapp
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I have been looking at getting one of the bigger outfitter tents with a wood stove for my hunting trips with larger groups. So far Cabelas Alaknak 12x20' is the favorite, but all of the hunting tents I am looking at are too intensive to set up day afer day on a river trip.

While doing my research I came across an old thread on the buzz about floorless twnts with stoves here: http://www.mountainbuzz.com/forums/...ves-rafters-need-to-get-on-board-40730-4.html

Since I will already have the stove I am thinking a second hot tent for river use might be in order. Being in the PNW I would prefer to have a floor because it is pretty much garuanteed there will be rain.

Does anyone have any suggestions for tents with floorsto use with a wood stove?

Kyle
I started the thread you reference. Rain is even a better reason not to have a floor, think cot yo! Tents with wood stoves are game changer for winter mutliday in my opinion. Big groups suck, get a smaller tent that is easier to setup.





 

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I would be in the minority I'm sure but I use an alaska tent and tarp Arktika for all my winter camping/cold weather/big group stuff. Been in lots of tents and it is without question the best out there but you pay for it. The thing can withstand a hurricane, will stay hot in -30 weather, and you will never ever ever have condensation develop. Very easy to setup but somewhat heavy and expensive.

On a sidenote it has bathtub floors that never let in water. Have kept it on top of 10 feet of snow for a week with a stove inside and never had any water issues.
 

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I loved Shapp's thread linked above. I dreamed for weeks of a kni-co stove setup in a Mountain Hardwear space station. I would stress too much over sparks, though.

I have come to enjoy BD megamid floorless tents for snow camping. Probe a deep spot, measure 9' x 9', dig down leaving a small pillar in the middle and benches around the edge. Bring several cheapo closed cell foam pads.
 

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I really like my 12'x12' alaknak. It will sleep 3 with cots and a stove. 60 mph winds and 8 inches of snow last season and no issues.

It takes me 30 minutes to setup by myself and 15 to 20 with 2 guys. Not sure about the 12x20 though. One thing to keep in mind is the space it would take. My tent has 5 bags. 1 tent 2vestibule 3 poles 4 stakes 5 fly 6 possibly...the floor protector. A 12x20 would take a lot more room. I'd say you'd need a big Raft to haul a 12x20, stove, cots etc...
 

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Consider a silnylon tipi. I have an 8 man from Seek Outside that I have used on everything from river trips to backpacking to cross country ski trips. Will fit 3 cots and gear or my family of 9 on the ground. This is it on the banks of the Selway and again in the back country of the Clearwater Range.


 

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I have a 4 man Seek Outside tent and a large size titanium stove. The the tent and stove weigh around 10 lbs. Easy to set up and pack. Nice to get up in the morning to a warm tent and hot water for drinks. You can use a tarp for a floor but I usually don't. I like it a lot!
 

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I've been looking at silnylon tipis and lightweight stoves for awhile from Kaifaru, Seek Outside, Wyo-(something?), TiGoat etc.

The people I know use them for winter trips and prefer the floorless in wet environments. They say they get super hot and stuff dries very quickly inside. Those big heavy outfitter tents are just too much to deal with IMO unless it's a long term trip or stored away at the location at which you will be using it.
 

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This is what I've been leaning towards - (Robens Klondike Tipi Tent 2015 | CampingWorld.co.uk)

I really like the raised sides for a little more room - I know it has a floor but I kind of like the idea, though I can see the beauty of no floor when its wet. There are other folks making "Bell tents" with removable floors, but they are mostly canvas, which I'd like to stay away from.

 

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Look at the Arctic Oven produced in Fairbanks, AK. They are rather pricey but worth every penny. We used one this past winter at 30 below and it was amazing!
 

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I like mtndocdanny's tent. I have used wall tents with wood stoves for 35 years and have had 2 tipis, a Baker tent and Whelen lean to.


A floor is unnecessary especially in weather cool enough to use a stove. Having a wood stove changes everything in colder weather. Then you can dry out your clothes, your bedding and get the chill out of the bones. For those that have not tried a canvas tent with a stove it is a big deal to feel one for the first time.


I have had winter parties with tents and stoves for almost 40 years.
People that run rivers in the off-season like steelhead fishermen, are the guys that should pay attention to this topic. You will need less ice and a smaller cooler, bring a heavier tent and a collapsible stove instead.
 

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what about ice shelters

I was looking at an easy pop up like an ice fishing tent. Floorless and I've seen some people's modification to have a wood stove.
CLAM Ice Fishing Shelters | Portable Ice Fishing Shelter

Here's a look an ice shelter being used to camp with a stove. Not too expensive and I can't imagine the modification is too hard.

Eskimo vs. Shappell vs. Frabil Hub Shelters

I'm going on a December Grand Canyon trip and have been looking into a hot tent situation that isn't too difficult to deal with. These stoves look awesome as well..

Portable Wood Stoves For The Hunter or Camper From Ellis Manufacturing

Lets get some more ideas goin here!
 

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I've used Arctic Oven tents (Alaska Tent and Tarp) and they're excellent for extreme cold weather. They are also really heavy and expensive.

I have a friend with a silnylon tipi (who also spend lots of nights in an Arctic Oven) and he loves his tipi with woodstove. He mule-packs so weight is an issue.
 
RMR, Hyside, NRS, Sawyer, K2 coolers, Whitewater Worthy Trailers, Frames and soft goods
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Here is a rough time laps from our trip to the Hulahula River in ANWR.
 

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I use the Sierra Designs mountain guide tarp as well as a MSR pavilion. Seek outside sewed in stove jacks to both of these for me. I made my wood stove out of an ammo can and all the chimney parts (Kni-Co) nest inside the can.
 

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I went on a hunting trip and stayed in my friend's Cabela's Alaknak. I cannot recommend this tent. It does not breathe because it is single wall coated nylon. It is dark and gloomy in dark green. The side walls are too short. It takes at least as long to set up as a wall tent.


A small canvas wall tent or Baker tent are worth considering. The tipi designs are simple to set up with only one pole. The old range tipis are handy also.
 

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I've had my MSR twin brother with a Ti-Goat stove jack sewed in at Rainy Pass Repair in Seattle for several years now, with the knick-co packer stove. Sets up in about 10 minutes with 1 person. Great for 2 with cots and gear, or 5 dudes sitting in their under shorts drinking cocktails at 15 degrees outside (which we lovingly refer to as pervert hot tent stew). Tent weighs 6 pounds or so with stakes and poles. Stove fits in an NRS Fire Pan bag (really) and goes in my regular dry box, with ax, shovel and kindling and hardwood lumber scraps. I load Bear Bricks in 2 - 20mm cans (square forest byproduct wood stove logs made only with compressed sawdust in Hood River, OR). The wood in the dry box plus the bear bricks easily make fire in the morning and at night for a 3 night steelhead trip on the Grande Ronde. In the winter when its is real cold, steelhead don't bite very good till the sun gets on the water, have a pile of kindling and wood ready to load in the stove in the morning, get up and light, then throw the coffee water pot on the wood stove. Slowly get going and have some coffee and hot cereal, BS for a while and slowly pack up. By then the sun is up and time to fish. Slay fish the rest of the afternoon. Get to camp about 4pm, setup tent, lite stove and proceed to drink hot totties, while you heat up some homemade stew on the stove. Its that simple.

The only draw back to the MSR twin brother is that it could be about 3 inches taller, or I could be 3 inches shorter, the latter of which is harder to accomplish. I am 6' tall, if you were 5.8 or 5.9 it would be perfect.
 
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