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He said HE needs a one handed hobby.
You keep your hands to yourself!
You can count on it.. Given his seat, and his swing, I know for certain I don't want ANY part of any one handed hobbies of his 😂🤣😜
 

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You guys just need to give your balls a tug (like Charlie) and survive the cold!
I'm not sure that's what Charlie is tugging on...😜

But I really don't want to know 🤣😂
 
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It isn't the prettiest thing but I took a diesel-fired heaters that people normally put into vans and stuck it into a toolbox with dryer vent line to pipe the warm air into the tent. Depending on how much heat I'm using I go through about 2 liters of diesel per night. A car battery will get you 2-3 nights of heat, I wound up building a LiFePo4 battery pack for it that I've yet to run out but I'd estimate would run for about a 5-6 nights. Unlike wood it goes all night without having to mess with it. Unlike propane there is no humidity added to the warm air or CO/CO2. Not as romantic as a wood stove but if you just want to plug in your battery and click a remote to get hot air, nothing beats it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
It isn't the prettiest thing but I took a diesel-fired heaters that people normally put into vans and stuck it into a toolbox with dryer vent line to pipe the warm air into the tent. Depending on how much heat I'm using I go through about 2 liters of diesel per night. A car battery will get you 2-3 nights of heat, I wound up building a LiFePo4 battery pack for it that I've yet to run out but I'd estimate would run for about a 5-6 nights. Unlike wood it goes all night without having to mess with it. Unlike propane there is no humidity added to the warm air or CO/CO2. Not as romantic as a wood stove but if you just want to plug in your battery and click a remote to get hot air, nothing beats it.
I don’t suppose you could post detailed pictures of your setup, could you? It would help a bunch of folks.
 

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I don’t suppose you could post detailed pictures of your setup, could you? It would help a bunch of folks.
Google Espar bunk heaters or Webasto. When I worked in the oil fields, almost every semi truck had one in the sleeper, they will literally roast you out of there if you turn them up. They were cantankerous though, and dependent on extremely clean fuel, otherwise it would clog the intake screens. They produce a little puff of smoke when they fire up, but other than that they are pretty clean burning. The Espar units seem to work more trouble free than the webastos...
 
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We lived in Park City Utah for three winters. Did a lot of hiking in the high Uintas. Every little valley over there had been impounded to secure water for SLC. Great fishing there. We acquired a female Malemute dog. Friendliest dog ever for us. She went on most hikes and in the fall would crawl between our sleeping bags to sleep. That dog was like a furnace you could feel the heat from her thru our sleeping bags.

Plus one on Wiggys bags and outerwear. Over the years I have acquired several of his bags. Same for coats. They are bulky but man do they last, very warm and can easily be washed and his zero degree bag models are super warm. You do not need a stove for sleeping with one of his alaskan style bags. Plus made in Grand Junction CO. I have his regular over bag and 20 degree bag and have used them a long long time. Just recently goat the over bag and a 20 degree bag in his new boat foot design. Getting old and feet just feel better and warmer with the new design with the foot area shaped in a modified v which improves heat retention and comfort. Plus on sale this month.
 

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While mine was a DIY affair I guess they make some prebuilt options now such as this:

Diesel heater

But this is my ugly creation. Couplers from a woodworking dust collection system so I can close off the openings when not in use. Plastic toolbox but I cut out a big section where the exhaust exits and bolted in some aluminum plate. Inlet is another dust collection coupler so you can feed from the tent if it's super cold out. Normally I just leave that hose off and let it be fresh air. The fuel tank is too large so I plan to get a smaller one before next season.

Vehicle Automotive lighting Hood Automotive tire Automotive tail & brake light

Wheel Tire Automotive tire Vehicle Automotive lighting

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Vehicle Tire Road surface
 

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If you live in an area with lots of dead, dry wood I can see not wanting to deal with it, but in the southwest you're carrying whatever fuel source you intend to use as heat so it's not too much of a hassle (other than the price of diesel currently 💀). My build is based on that guys video with a few improvements. The heaters have to be upright as he discussed, with the exhaust going out the bottom. I found a taller toolbox and routed the exhaust and air intakes inside the box and out the side so the whole unit can just be placed on the ground instead of only being able to be placed on a roof rack. Also found the plastic couplers that come with the unit to not have a good grip on the dryer vent line hence the woodworking dust collector couplings I used instead. As for the connection itself the kit comes with some basic hose clamps, replacing those with the keyed hose clamps (like a wingnut on them, available at any hardware store) makes it a tool-less setup.

My only real complaint with them is they don't work great above 7k elevation. At that point you either have to start mixing in kerosene or run straight kerosene, and you can't run the heater too rich (much past 50% power or so). It then pretty much cuts out entirely past 9k regardless of fuel type. I've been spitballing some type of electric turbo system for the air intake to mitigate this as I regularly use this setup to camp out in ski parking lots in the winter that are around that elevation but haven't put anything into testing yet.
 

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Well the real secret is your sleep system. Your only using the fire to restore your core temperature and dry off, dry clothes maybe cook make coffee. Even a big baddass Vermont casting with hardwoods is only good for a night with just a few coals in morning and cool enough to touch and that's 600lbs. I sleep cold (without my seat buddy) and I finally bit the bullet and got a feathered friends bag. I got a zero degree rating. That and nice new wool they have now and iam good to 10-15 below. After that it's my next favorite thing. Down pants and shirt (kifaru)! After that it's time to stay home. Closed cell matt, old school thermorest, great bag, good wool "sleep clothrs" your good. No wood stoves in mountaineering and those guys survive the worst . So get a good little stoves, bring some hard wood, hang a clothes line, get dry and snuggle up in a good bag! We slept on snow alot last winter and I stayed cozy warm. Stick yet head out and re light the stove snd get baked outa bed lol!
I had typed a reply earlier but didn't post it. I couldn't agree more. I don't really try to keep heat going all night, but definitely get a good fire going to get my core temperature up, dry out wet/clammy clothes/drysuit/etc. And again in the morning to get the ol' joints warmed up and get going (and cooking coffee on the stove is a perk [pun!!])

Then let my body cool just slightly so I don't sweat in the down bag, snuggle in and sleep like the dead. I like a good down bag with an old wool army blanket over it--both additional insulation and I can use it to cover my head/shoulders..and it keeps the down from getting wet from respiration. Oh, and a good wool watch cap
 

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If you live in an area with lots of dead, dry wood I can see not wanting to deal with it, but in the southwest you're carrying whatever fuel source you intend to use as heat so it's not too much of a hassle (other than the price of diesel currently 💀). My build is based on that guys video with a few improvements. The heaters have to be upright as he discussed, with the exhaust going out the bottom. I found a taller toolbox and routed the exhaust and air intakes inside the box and out the side so the whole unit can just be placed on the ground instead of only being able to be placed on a roof rack. Also found the plastic couplers that come with the unit to not have a good grip on the dryer vent line hence the woodworking dust collector couplings I used instead. As for the connection itself the kit comes with some basic hose clamps, replacing those with the keyed hose clamps (like a wingnut on them, available at any hardware store) makes it a tool-less setup.

My only real complaint with them is they don't work great above 7k elevation. At that point you either have to start mixing in kerosene or run straight kerosene, and you can't run the heater too rich (much past 50% power or so). It then pretty much cuts out entirely past 9k regardless of fuel type. I've been spitballing some type of electric turbo system for the air intake to mitigate this as I regularly use this setup to camp out in ski parking lots in the winter that are around that elevation but haven't put anything into testing yet.
those Chinese Diesel heaters are cool. I can't see myself using one on river trips, but just bought one for my van. I got the 8k and think I'd probably have been just as good with a 2k..the 8k puts out WAY more heat than I need!!
 

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I agree those are for over landing not as good for western rivers. I’ve actually gott ‘n my ass kicked dealing with wood in deep snow and wind and all and just went to bed all cozy in my bag when I said screw this!!! Wet is unique and if you just had a small tub of oak and some fire starter as part of your survival kit you’d get warm and dry out . My big tents 1k• degrees inside when it’s blazing lol! -20 below was 66 or something and very cozy!!
 
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