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These are a few of my summer projects to help cut the cost of expensive gear and fill some free time between work and the river. I built a 3 bay frame out of top-rail fencing pipe, and speed rail fittings from frontierplay.com. I spec’ed the frame as large as possible to my 13’ Hyside, to mainly haul gear on multi-days because I would much rather run a paddle boat otherwise. The frame came out to cost something around $300, which is relatively cheap compared to buying a frame.

My next project was a Table/Seat/Backboard. The table/seat I built is made from pine with cross lap joints underneath for strength and warp prevention. For the legs I used ½ inch galvanized steel plumbers pipe that are attached to the table with flanges. The legs are stored underneath the table when it is on the frame. Finally the entire table is coated with spar urethane to waterproof the wood.

The last small project I did was with scrap wood from the table, it is what I guess I would call a frame caddy for convenience and “beer down” prevention on long flat water days. The Caddy has a small compartment underneath the base for sunglasses, lighters, and other goodies and still needs a cup holder and ashtray on top of the base. The caddy sits on the side rail in between the oar mounts and seat.

Home build gear is cheap and is fun to make. These projects took me quite a long time to complete, with hours waiting for UPS and FedEx, handfuls of trips to home depot and local river shops, lots of measuring and re-measuring, and most importantly reading pages and pages of this forum for instruction and ideas. Without the buzz I would have struggled through this rig, and that is why I’m posting this.

P.S.-I’m sorry of the Pictures are all really big I’m still trying figure it out.
-Targos

 

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Looks plenty stout. Plus you can change the set-up for different loads and trips. Good job. I agree about the fun of building yourself.

The fittings look like Kee-Klamps, heavy-duty galvanised steel. I used 'em for my first cat frame and then shifted to the SpeedRail aluminum type, which save a bit of weight and cost more. But one of our favorite runs has a steep carry to the river. Makes the lighter stuff seem worth the $$.
 

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Gotta love Mountain Buzz...lots of good ideas. Nice work on the bench and frame. The nice part is, since you built it, if something doesn't work right, you make changes to 'tweak' the design. Even better, you have enough money left that you can afford to go rafting.
 

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I love that pic ... reminds me of home
Back in Thibodaux folks would build a platform on floating oil drums then build a shack (fishing camp) on top so it will rise and fall with the level of the swamp
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The Table weights about 35-40 pounds but only cost me about $90 which is pretty good seeing as it does just as well as my buddies $220 table from NRS.

But what can I say Grif is quite the handy man, now thats a rig! But I don't think the red tank on top is a hot tub, I'm pretty sure that were he stores all the turkey legs and schlitz.
 

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Go Grif!

On the way into Chico Hot Springs on the Yellowstone River in Montana is a graveyard of lost trailers. There's a big single-wide right next to the road with oil drums welded underneath down the whole length.

Wonder if it ever got launched?

If America isn't a weird dream, what is it?
 

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Gotta like a workshop/garage with a couple of kegs in it. I've been thinking about building a simple table as well, been shopping the Thrifty store for a trashed folding table I could scavenge legs off of. The pipe/flange program looks easy enough, how"s the stability without any bracing? And as I'm not much of a woodworker, any reason a piece of plywood wouldn't work? Other than the obvious lack of aesthetics, of course.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
SBlue,
The Pipe/Flange set up is pretty sturdy when it is on soft malleable ground like sand, grass, dirt, etc. but it does wiggle a bit on concrete......although I don't how often I'll use the table on concrete I'm not much of a "tailgater".

The downside of the pipe/flange set up is the added weight of steel, but it really isn't that bad. I'm all about the "reuse" idea but if you can't find an old table to salvage the legs, I saw a thread on the Buzz about pre-fab legs from these guys:

:: Ebco Products Corp - Table Legs & Folding Legs ::

I've also seen tables using the legs from Roll-a-table and T-nuts and that seems to work pretty well.

As for using plywood It should work fine but I wouldn't use OSB and probably go with 3/4" if its going to double as a seat. If the Plywood is regular exterior plywood then you will need to waterproof it to prevent warping or you could use marine plywood but I still may coat that too. You can do this with epoxy or spar urethane (like I did), if you go with epoxy then you will need to coat it with a UV protectant because the epoxy is not UV sturdy.

Nevertheless, I'm not much of a woodworker myself except for taking wood shop in high school. But there are plenty of small projects much like mine on the Buzz that can help you with yours, it just takes a little bit of digging and maybe some stupid questions here and there.

I hope this helps and Good Luck!
-Targos
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thats a job well done boatman, I like how the legs are angled for more stability. Learning to weld is next on my list, its a skill that is very versatile and seems to be pretty fun.
 
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