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Doing a rogue trip on spring break and looked at current level......11200cfs. Can anyone offer any insight about a level like this. I've done it at 6000.
 

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Thanks for the link! Thats a pretty impressive forecast. This will definitely affect the risk assessment. I have worked with these forecasts and agree they aren't always very accurate.
 

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oregon whitewater association has a trip in 2 days. 16-18
i rocked some highwater trips before, but nothing like that.
might have to take kaya for a walk down river trail.
 

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check there web site. i can't row for 6 months, so no report from me. if it gets that high I'll walk down and take some pic's.
 

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Yeah at that level it should be pretty interesting, kaya and kaya I will go for a walk with ya. But truly I doubt it will get that high.
 

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I've done it a couple of time at close to that level (over 10,000) and raining. With some big water experience it really isn't that tough. It's moving fast, so it's hard to get more then a couple days on the river. You can go anywhere in Blossom.
 

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The flows can be a little deceiving this time of year, at least from the Agness gauge. In the spring, after any significant rain, I'd say 50% or more of Agness reading is flow from the Illinois. In the summer the Illy is just a trickle so the Agness gauge works fine. A few years back we planned on a Illinois trip but the rains raised the level over 4k which was our limit, so we jumped on the Rogue instead. It was 11k at Kerby for the Illinois, 9k at Grants Pass for the Rogue, and 26k at Agness. I'd go off the Grants Pass gauge and maybe add some side streams to give you a more accurate guess. BTW, at that flow, most everything was washed out. We probably could've done the whole thing in a day but instead we did two short days with a camp at the Ranch.
 

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The flows can be a little deceiving this time of year, at least from the Agness gauge. In the spring, after any significant rain, I'd say 50% or more of Agness reading is flow from the Illinois. In the summer the Illy is just a trickle so the Agness gauge works fine. A few years back we planned on a Illinois trip but the rains raised the level over 4k which was our limit, so we jumped on the Rogue instead. It was 11k at Kerby for the Illinois, 9k at Grants Pass for the Rogue, and 26k at Agness. I'd go off the Grants Pass gauge and maybe add some side streams to give you a more accurate guess. BTW, at that flow, most everything was washed out. We probably could've done the whole thing in a day but instead we did two short days with a camp at the Ranch.
Actually the Agness gauge is 2.6 miles above the Illinois confluence. The Agness gauge is a better gauge of the wild & scenic section in all seasons to my mind as the Applegate as well as many sidestreams add a considerable amount of flow to the Rogue below the Grants Pass gauge. using the GP Gauge for the Lower Rogue especially in winter is akin to using the Kirby gauge for the Illinois. Of course the Kirby gauge is all we got but every time I get off the Illinois I wish there was a gauge near the take-out so you could know what amount of water you really were on.
 

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Actually the Agness gauge is 2.6 miles above the Illinois confluence. The Agness gauge is a better gauge of the wild & scenic section in all seasons to my mind as the Applegate as well as many sidestreams add a considerable amount of flow to the Rogue below the Grants Pass gauge. using the GP Gauge for the Lower Rogue especially in winter is akin to using the Kirby gauge for the Illinois. Of course the Kirby gauge is all we got but every time I get off the Illinois I wish there was a gauge near the take-out so you could know what amount of water you really were on.

Well, you shot that theory all to hell. Gauge locations and which gauge to read on which river and what level is good or not, all makes great conversation around the campfire when everyone should've been in bed hours earlier. I agree that I'd like to know what the exact level is at my put-in and where I take out. In the spring, I wouldn't be suprised if the flow doubled on the Illy or the Rogue from the put-in to the take out. I'm always impressed by the amout of water dumping in around every corner!
 

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Gauges are your friends

Well, you shot that theory all to hell. Gauge locations and which gauge to read on which river and what level is good or not, all makes great conversation around the campfire when everyone should've been in bed hours earlier. I agree that I'd like to know what the exact level is at my put-in and where I take out. In the spring, I wouldn't be suprised if the flow doubled on the Illy or the Rogue from the put-in to the take out. I'm always impressed by the amout of water dumping in around every corner!
Well, I can't help myself because I'm a gauge loving fool. But the first part of your post is close to heresy...gauges, when you learn how use to them offer up a lot of info that can help keep you safe and save lots of time and gas.
Now as to the second part of your post you are right, 1,200cfs on the Illinois in May can be a lot different then 1,200cfs in February. I did a June 1,200 trip last year (very wet year here as in most years June is way low) and I would say it was about the easiest level I have been down (covered but not pushy) I did a 1,200 cfs Feb. trip this year and by the time we reached the Green Wall the river was a good 3' higher then in June and pumping and Sub Hole rock on the spring trip was 2' out of the water, on the winter trip 2' under water!
 

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I'm going to stay out of the which gauge to use debate.

I've done over a hundred float trips on the Rogue, most at flows under 10,000 cfs. The highest I've floated was at about 35,000 cfs on a trip at this time of year in 1989. The high water made most of the rapids easier--including Rainie Falls, which was basically just a big wave. The exceptions, however, were Mule Creek Canyon, which featured some very pushy eddy walls, and Blossom Bar--with all of the rocks under water.

Instead of a rock garden, Blossom was a 200 yard row huge back-curling waves and extremely powerful laterals. None of our rafts was able to get outside the laterals. Everyone got funneled into the backrollers, and the question of who stayed upright was determined by luck and maybe downstream momentum.

A heavily-loaded fifteen-foot barge raft flipped, a paddle raft ejected most of its paddlers, and the four remaining rafts (all bucket boats) were swamped. The jet boat from Paradise Lodge chased the overturned raft down to Huggin's Canyon, where they captured it and tied it up.

All in all, I don't recommend running the Rogue at that water level. But if you do, try using a strong downstream ferry angle at Bloosom Bar to hit the laterals at 90 degrees, high in the rapid to try to stay off the backrollers.
 

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35,000 cfs wow. was mule creek canyon flowing over the top of walls ?
No, not over the walls. The south wall is very high--hundreds of feet--so there's no way the river could overtop that. The north wall is stair-stepped. In most of the canyon, there is a wide shelf midway between the normal water level and the trail. That shelf was under water, which in some places doubled the width of the river. But the shelf isn't continuous, so in some places there were constrictions that caused flume-like chutes.

One of our rafts got swamped in the upper part of the canyon. They managed to get into an eddy to bail, but then when they tried to exit the eddy, they got trashed--they ended up in a pour-over at the head of the eddy, lost their oars and some of their gear, which wasn't well tied, and were completely filled with water.

I was waiting for them in the eddy at Old Mine Riffle and spotted their oars floating by. I sent one raft out to catch the first oar, and then I went out after the second oar. We caught them both. I landed on river right, but the other guy landed on the left. So I carried my spare plus the recovered oar back up the trail to the stranded raft (after scaling 40 feet up the cliff to the trail).

We re-grouped and had lunch on the right, within sight of Blossom Bar. It was the same raft that had been trashed in Mule Creek Canyon that ended up flipping in Blossom--while being rowed by a very experienced guide.
 
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