Mountain Buzz banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Any Taos guides on here that help me out? I'm looking to spend the summer guiding in Taos and have no idea how to get into it.

I basically want to know everything about guiding up there because I know nothing.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,836 Posts
Several people on here that can help you out with quality beta. Personally I would recommend contacting Kokopelli....but I have to ask, are you sure you want to guide in Taos? They have been consistently dry. You will likely spend a lot of time pushing rubber down the Racecourse at very low flow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
Several people on here that can help you out with quality beta. Personally I would recommend contacting Kokopelli....but I have to ask, are you sure you want to guide in Taos? They have been consistently dry. You will likely spend a lot of time pushing rubber down the Racecourse at very low flow.
Logan, he lives in Albuquerque. And a low water season on the racecourse can turn you into a damn good guide and doesn't suck. Trust me, I know.


Any Taos guides on here that help me out? I'm looking to spend the summer guiding in Taos and have no idea how to get into it.

I basically want to know everything about guiding up there because I know nothing.

jjeco5, Definitely look into Kokopelli! They are Amazing and Wonderful and will take damn good care of you. (I have worked for a lot of companies on a lot of Rivers and have never been treated as well as I was at Kokopelli. Hands down, they really are the bomb!) They are also based in Santa Fe and have other guides that commute from Abq. so that might make it easy for you.

If you are looking to relocate to Taos I would recommend Far Flung Adventures. Or if your looking to camp in a van down by the River for the summer, New Wave or NMRA. They all teach guide schools and are all good people.

As far as Logan poopoing the Rio Grande watershed... don't listen to him. Yes there have been some consistent low water years, but it's also due for a good one (and is AMAZING when it's good,) and really doesn't suck when it's low. Like I said, a low water season on the racecourse will hone in your technical skills and just make you a better boater! (in 2002 I worked the racecourse down to 147 cfs, and I'm so very grateful for that season and all it taught me! I will never again be afraid of low water.) :)

Also, we get low water up on the Ark too... it's not like it's always sic ass high water here, I mean yes we tend to get more consistent runoff than some other watersheds, but not always. And the Ark and Rio watersheds are so close that usually when one is suffering, the other one is too. 2002 & 2012 were low water seasons on both rivers, 2009 were both super bomber seasons, etc... I mean, the Ark is rad & all... but there is something about the Rio that is just pure Magic. Oh, & you have the Chama there too, which is also pretty magical... just sayin'...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Yeah, what she said!! RiverMamma is good, RiverMamma is wise.:cool:
I'm a guide here as well.
Also very important to a newb.....plenty of work and exposure.
In a season you can have a very broad range of water to learn on.
And the Rio Chama, if you get into those trips, is a great place to both learn and hone your multi-day skills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
I love the racecourse! I may just go down there and guide. Rivermamma, well said. My only concern is if there is any work available during these lower flow years?
I agree that learning how to guide on low water makes you a waaaay better guide than high flows.


Woke up this morning at 10:13.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,917 Posts
Taos has had it's share of low water lately. But some times look out Charlie!

In May one year I rowed Pilar at some 5000 plus cfs and had all the excitement I wanted in a 14 ft self bailer raft. We made the move at Souse Hole but only cause I got lucky with my best ever standup forward push stroke at the right time and my guy in the front and in the back both made amazing hi sides as we hit the hole's flipper wave.

Also done Pilar (Lower Box to low to even drag) at 250 cfs. Not the rush at normal levels but we did it and had fun.

RiverMama has it right in my opinion, when she posted that the lower Box, Pilar and Rio Chama runs are magical places to be even when the water is low. If all else fails, set on the balcony at the square, drink Tequila and watch the Turons buy hi priced painting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I know the rc at low water really well, It is where I kayak mostly so I know it well at low water.

any thoughts on Los Rios? I have a family friend who has worked there and loved it.

I have some rafting experience on RC, Chama, and did a section of the Zambezi (which is what inspired me to get into whitewater).

I have heard that there are some house sitting options to stay at during the summers if camping isn't available, but I also have a minivan that I can live out of.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,836 Posts
Nothing personal with my low water comment Elisha, just wanted to stir the pot a little! ;-)

I enjoy boating in New Mexico at a variety of flows, but there is certainly something to be said for seeing true high and low flows in the same season, especially when learning, and if current patterns hold true you may only see high water once or twice a decade there...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I'm hoping for a good high water season this year but I am not super sure how it's looking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
The snowpack in the Upper Rio Grande isn't super low. Right now it's hovering around 70 %. I've seen years where it doesn't get above 30%. This is encouraging but it could be all for not if the weather gets warm. I'm crossing my fingers for another big storm this month and a Huge spring dumping that is super wet.

I've only spent a handful of nights around the Taos area, when I was running the Box and RC. How is the weather for the whole summer? Any rainy season?


Woke up this morning at 10:13.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Some good rains happened in November and there tends to be a lot of April/ late spring storms.

I live in Albuquerque so I only have limited knowledge of Taos weather.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,836 Posts
One thing to keep in mind is unless its a big year very little of the upper basin water will make it out of the San Luis Valley once the irrigation is turned on, and New Mexico's snowpack is pretty sad. I spent a couple days skiing in the Taos area last week. Sounds like most of January is going to be dry. Hopefully El Nino kicks back in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Water Law

I'm not a lawyer and don't fully understand the applicable water laws, but as I understand it Colorado will likely allow water through to New Mexico this year, and we should have a reasonable season this summer despite the bad snowpack.

This is about the 5th consecutive year of low snowpack. Colorado legally has to allow a certain amount of water through to New Mexico, but in a single year they can take 100% of the water. If they do, they will owe water with interest in subsequent years. The first 3 years of this drought Colorado took close to 100% of the water and the Rio Grand had terrible seasons. I figured 2014 was going to be terrible as well because snowpack was even lower than 2013. Last year turned out to be a great season though because Colorado couldn't continue to take all the water. I'm hoping this year is similar to last year in that Colorado has to allow water through.

Perhaps someone who knows more and has access to the data might weigh in - I'm very curious...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
I would personally avoid Los Rios, (can you say McRafting?) I second everything that Elisha(RiverMamma) has said. She and I worked for Kokopelli together and they have a great setup for their guides, who don't live in vans or trucks. NMRA and New Wave are slightly smaller outfits and have similar setups, they just have the onsite living options.

If you want any more details, feel free to PM me. I have spent my fair share bouncing down the Rio Grande.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
For a season to be pretty decent on the upper rio, what percentage would the snowpack be? Of course we want the most and high water for months. I'm just curious because on other rivers where I have worked, it seems that anything above 75 percent makes for a decent year.
I know that this area has had a drought for years so maybe it would take a lot more to make a season this year. I'm seeing that the pack is super low now. Also where can I find beta about how much water Colorado is going to keep from the Grande?

Victor


Woke up this morning at 10:13.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Diversions

The 2015 season depends heavily upon how much water Colorado diverts in the San Luis Valley.

It does not appear we are headed for a snowpack that could overwhelm the diversion capacity of the San Luis Valley in 2015, so they could technically divert 100%, leaving us with a terrible season like 2013. Legally however, they may have serious incentive to let some through again this year, which could make for a good season like 2014.

Snowpack is not the key factor, laws and gate valves will determine the 2015 season on the Rio.

I'd think these matters would be in the public record, or maybe I don't know where to research it, water rights are a pretty heated issue in the Southwest.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top