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Hello,

In creekin there is no good wood. So with the low fall flows and no ice now is the time to motivate and get out there with any type of saw, hike your local run, and clean up the wood! I find the best way is to cut the log (s) into 1' to 2' sections and let the water wash the small pieces downstream when the flows return.

We all know of “wood” that needs to be removed and now is the time to get it done! Not to single out the Front Range boatin locals but Bailey needs work. A group of you “rangers” needs to get up to Bailey and get that pain in the ass last portage cut out of there as well as some of the other logs that dot that run. Any takers?

So sound off on updates of runs that are "clean" or in serious need of cleaning. Here is my update - the "Caldron" area of Lake Creek has been cleansed and is currently clean and good to go. No need to portage the logs above the falls or duck the log at the bottom of the falls.

Help keep your local creekin runs clean and remember that the life you save could be you own.

V
 

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I don't know about you but I carry a copy of Kevin's handy chart to consult, before i remove any riparian wood.


In all seriousness, Kevin's article makes many legitimate points, but comes dangerously close to saying "do not remove wood from class five". With no disrespect to Kevin, I am inclined to remove much more wood than the "chart" allows.


Here is a copy for anyone not familiar. Study up now, Gary.

Do Not Remove Log Û More OK to Remove Log

Ecological Considerations


Sand, Gravel, Cobble Banks Û Bedrock Banks
Floodplain Adjacent to Channel Û Cliffs Adjacent to Channel
Log Trapping Sediment Û Log Above Water Level
Log is Large and Long Û Log is Small and Short
Stream has Endangered Species Û No Endangered Species
No Riparian Vegetation Û Dense Riparian Vegetation
Heavily Impacted Watershed Û Intact Forested Watershed

Paddling Considerations

Log is Obvious Û Log is Hidden
Log is Avoidable While Paddling Û Log is Unavoidable
Log is Easily Portaged Û Log is Impossible to Portage
Log Unlikely to Entrap Paddler Û Log Likely to Entrap Paddler
Log in Seldom Paddled Reach Û Log in Popular Reach
Class V Û Class II/III
Wilderness Û Urban
 

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Shut the hell up Frank

Why don't you go sharpen your chainsaw and stop acting like the almighty...If I recall you were part of the cleaning crew that got destroyed in the paper..Don't need to study shit..If you have ever seen or paddled the cauldron you would have been the first one up there to piss off the tree huggers...Shut the hell up!

Everytime someone who doesn't have a clue about creeking sees a post about wood being cleaned out of a run they will never run they feel the need to spout up...It gets old!Wood that is dangerous to a paddler on a run I will gladly remove..
Gary
 

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Lighten up Gary. I know it can be hard to read sarcasm, but did you really think I was against wood removal? How many other folks do you know that have run Super Max with a chainsaw in their boat? Or that own hip waders specifically for pruning? I am about as pro wood removal as they come. Most of my post was in jest, but i do try to be somewhat considerate when trimming, even if i don't follow the "chart".

Are you still mad that I showed your wife Carlos' thread about your bike incident?

Love ya Gar, Dave
 

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I didn't say don't remove wood. All I said is that you should THINK about your actions. I might overate thinking.

Cleaning all wood is kinda like some choad drilling bolts every 2 feet on a sport climb; it makes it safer and easier, but there are also negative consequences.

If you look at the Kevin's guidelines, then steep creeks would likely have the following qualities:
1) Bedrock Banks
2) Cliffs Adjacent to Channel
3) Log Not Trapping Sediment
4) Intact Forested Watershed

These are qualities that make it "more OK" to remove the tree.

"Wood that is dangerous to a paddler on a run I will gladly remove..."
I agree. What about a tree that can be easily avoided and portaged though? Maybe we should consider whether or not that one has ecological benifits.
 

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Wood in Piney?

Hey, I was wondering if anybody has hiked into piney river and knows of the wood situation. I know it is in a wilderness run and did not run for several years until last. Did it get flushed out or does it still have alot in it. Just out of curiosity for the next summer. Russell
 

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uh oh! lets not start with the piney. if i remember there was a heated post on the old board awhile back discussing the cleaning of the piney. anyway, i agree with most of the stipulations for wood removal but why is the class of rapid a reason? seems if the eco stipulations are met it wouldnt matter the class. i am more inclined to yank that manky piece of deathtrap wood out of a five before i mess with class 3 wood where another channel likely allows safe passage. it seems most class fives on steep creeks have stable boulder beds dont they?
 
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