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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve done some research and am looking for some answers/ reassurance about my set up. I am going from pins and clips to oarlocks. First time on the water was fine but I think I need my setup dialed in better. Oar handles felt high and by my shoulders and a decent amount of play in the oar lock.

here are my dumb newbie questions.

Oarlocks
-Should the cobra oarlock hold the oars in the middle of the oar lock? The picture sawyer gives shows a gap between the oar and the lock. My oar shafts sit right at the bottom of the oarlock.
-Can I tune by putting in a vise and squeezing to make them tighter or do I have to hit them with a hammer on a hard surface?

Oars – I have rope wrapped
-Is there a way to protect the rope from the oarlock? I have read that people wax the rope with paraffin wax. I rowed for a couple hours and the rope already is showing wear.
-Should the rubber oar stopper sit on the oarlock or be off a little bit?

Oar towers- NRS
-What angle do you try to keep your NRS oar towers at? Do you want the oarlock shaft perpendicular to the water?

Thanks
 

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1- Mine sit at the bottom too and occasionally rise a little during stroke
2- idk
3- beeswax
4- on the oarlock
5- ~20 degrees, but depends on seat height.
 
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OP, the Cobra Oar Locks are tune-able. Rope wrap will begin to show signs of use from the bronze, but typically not an issue unless you are seeing unusual wear. Some of the harder oar lock materials, along with any grit/sand/foreign materials in the rope itself can accelerate wear. Wash/clean if you feel like they are gritty or show unusual wear.

The rubber oar stop can be used against the lock, or off when you're rowing, it all depends on your style. They are also "tune-able" to adjust oar position when you are rowing by simply rolling up or down on the rope. Easier when warmer, so wait until your next sunny day.

Derek

 

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I have Carlisles so I've never had rope wraps but when I was first setting things up and figuring out the rowing geometry that works best for me. I noticed excessive wear in the plastic sleeves so I adjusted the angle of my oar towers and that took care of the problem. I set the angle so the stopper sat relatively flat when I was seated and holding the oars in a comfortable rowing position. If the wear is excessive adjusting the angle of your oar towers or your adjuting your seat height might help reduce wear. Other than that I can't say much but good luck as I don't have experience with cobra's or rope wraps.

I set my oar rights to where I have maximum purchase on the water when the oar is perpendicular to the raft. As far as stoppers I prefer them against the oar locks others do not it's a matter of preference. Try it both ways and see what works for you.
 

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Your oars are supposed to float fairly freely in the lock, not be pinched in place. Yes, they will rest on the bottom of the lock when you are not pulling or pushing. Unless your oar is easily sliding out the top opening, you probably don't need to change the shape of the lock.

The rope is the protection for the underlying oar shaft. The section of rope that is in the locks will show wear, and compress some, but will last for many years. If or when it fails, simply replace the rope wrap.

Some folks row on the rubber stoppers, others don't. I keep my stoppers about 3-4 inches off the lock as I don't want the additional friction when feathering the oar.

My NRS oar towers are canted 10-15º outward. Think about having the oarlock shaft closer to perpendicular to the oar when the oar blade is in the water.
 

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Keep the pins and clips. Its a better set up for whitewater, its simpler, less parts, cheaper, you can brace yourself on them, your oar will never come out and hit a passenger in the head, and you are more likely to break an oar with open locks. There is more I can keep going on with, but thats not really what this thread is about. Open oar locks are like skiing in leather ski boots.
 

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Keep the pins and clips. Its a better set up for whitewater, its simpler, less parts, cheaper, you can brace yourself on them, your oar will never come out and hit a passenger in the head, and you are more likely to break an oar with open locks. There is more I can keep going on with, but thats not really what this thread is about. Open oar locks are like skiing in leather ski boots.
Oh god. Here it goes again
 

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Keep the pins and clips. Its a better set up for whitewater, its simpler, less parts, cheaper, you can brace yourself on them, your oar will never come out and hit a passenger in the head, and you are more likely to break an oar with open locks. There is more I can keep going on with, but thats not really what this thread is about. Open oar locks are like skiing in leather ski boots.
Agreed! Pins and Clips Forever!
 

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Keep the pins and clips. Its a better set up for whitewater, its simpler, less parts, cheaper, you can brace yourself on them, your oar will never come out and hit a passenger in the head, and you are more likely to break an oar with open locks. There is more I can keep going on with, but thats not really what this thread is about. Open oar locks are like skiing in leather ski boots.
I don't understand the fascination people have with crippling themselves with open oarlocks when they remove the sole benefit with oar wrongs. Stay with the pins and clips, adjust the oar towers so that when the oars are parallel to the boat, and perpendicular to the water, the handles are 6 inches above your knees, and 6 inches in front of them. Doing that will give you a damn good starting point to tweak them in if you need. Sounds like you're trying to correct poor oar mechanics by shooting yourself in the foot..

YMMV
 
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after driving ford, chevy and dodge pickups most of my life, I switched to toyota tacomas and since then never looked back.
and after learning on pins and clips, switching to oar rights, finally went to guide school and now row open oarlocks.
and
some times I drain my raft cooler, some times I do not ------ depends on how I feel at the time.

Things never change in the boating community, just rotate over time.
 

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after driving ford, chevy and dodge pickups most of my life, I switched to toyota tacomas and since then never looked back.
and after learning on pins and clips, switching to oar rights, finally went to guide school and now row open oarlocks.
and
some times I drain my raft cooler, some times I do not ------ depends on how I feel at the time.

Things never change in the boating community, just rotate over time.
Let’s see your taco?
 

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have never figured out how to post a photo on the board.

But it is a 2012 v6 4wd access cab with cab hi camper shell and yakima rack system on shell with additional bar across cab (so my various canoes fit on top better ) and the old yakima roller on rear bar that helps me load canoes and cutthroat frame on the roof. Easy to drive in town, will pull my raft trailer when I decide to pull the trailer. It does great in 4 wd when I need it. Gets decent gas mpg and by 2012 tacoma got the automatic transmission worked out and I switched from stick to auto. 120k miles on it and other than oil change and recommended maintenance ---- trouble free.

I have driven full size pickups and while they are great on the highway, I find them harder to park than my right size for me Taco. The new Ford, Chevy, Dodge full size pickups are just awesome machines with all the gadgets built in. I was just looking at and riding in a bud's Ford Raptor full size truck and it is an awesome truck. The price tag is out of my disposable income comfort zone.

Tacomas have a history of running fine for hundreds of thousand miles altho I usually sell and replace around 150 k. I am so pleased with my 2012 version that if and when the motor dies I might just spend the money to have that company replace the running gear and engine with a diesel.

I am not knocking any other vehicles. Kinda like raft, canoe, or kayak choice, what ever meets the individual's needs is what I support. By the way, over the decades I have had a couple 4 Runners and think they are good to go as well. For me tho, I like the pickup version due to the covered storage, I can sleep in it and haul things like building materials etc.
 

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I've never used pins and clips but it seems obvious you will break more oars with them. That impact of a downstream oar flying out of an oarlock has to go somewhere. Perhaps that's better than taking the chance of one hitting you in the head.
 
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