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I thought I would check with some of you innovative boaters to see if you have come up with a way to boat when you only have one vehicle.

This will be for day trips of just a few mile stretches. I would rather not drop off my IK at the put in and then drive to the take out, so I am looking for a way to drop the car at the take out and then haul my IK back to the put in. I saw a video once where a couple did this with there small raft using a wheelbarrow. I am thinking there has to be a better way to do this though.

Any suggestions?
 

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Well Steve the easiest way is to haul a bicycle with, then roll up IK and strap on a hiking frame and bike to put-in and chain bike to tree. For longer shuttles buying a cheap street legal dirtbike and doing same thing. Your just take a chance of possible theft while on the river, so I would do your best to know the area really well. I have a Tomcat single and have done the bike thing a couple of times, which is about 50lbs with all the gear, and a two-piece paddle is a must. Of course a much more expensive option would be using a trailer and hauling a very cheap small second vehicle. But of course gas expenses would increase alot. Just some options!!
 

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If your trip distances are more than what you can walk comfortably, you are pretty much out of luck without some form of human or engine powered conveyance. I have often thought about getting hold of some retiree in the area and paying him to help with a shuttle but no such luck so far. The other option with a Ducky is to make a small trailer that can be attached to a mountain bike or something and using that as a shuttle conveyance. The problem with a ducky is that unlike hardshell grab bars there is no rigid metal handle to serve as an anchor point for a chain lock. I was n thinking of passing the chain through the drain hole and around the side tube. Trying to steal it would be counter productive then.
 

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gunnerman has the best idea for short runs. Just take a long cable lock and run it through a d-ring or drain holes if you boat alone. Depending where you live there is one obvious option, hitchhike. If you're out in the boonies this might not work, but mountain and river folk are very generous about giving rides. I boated 28 times on the Poudre this summer and always left my truck at the put in and a buddy with the boat at take out while I hitchhiked to the truck and rarely waited more than five minutes (granted the Poudre has very good hitchhiking).
 

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I hitchhiked boating, all over Alaska. I would drop my boat at the putin by stashing it out of site. Then I would drive to the take out and proceed to hitch hike back to the put in with my paddle in hand. Some times it would take some time to get picked up, Alaska is Alaska after all. It was always some local in a pickup, who would give me a lift. I would be passed by motorhome after motorhome, who would never stop for a boater..........
 

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Small road legal dirt bike or moped- carry it on a hitch carrier from Harbor Freight. If you have to leave your rig at one end of the trip, consider anchoring out in the current- that has dissuaded theft for me so far. At least they'd have to earn it....

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That mention of a small dirt bike in the above post was intriguing. I googled this type of bike and was amazed at the low prices mentioned.....most under $ 600. Thats less than a Kayak?? Is this possible? My shuttle would almost always be on paved roads so what would my options be if there is some such thing? My wt 205 lbs.
Thanks.

[I am not trying to start a bike specific thread].
 

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Just about anything- but keep the weight under @300 lbs or so. If you're new to riding, a moped or scooter is a damn good idea as a first bike. Larger diameter wheels are gonna be easier to handle on loose dirt roads than small donut scooter tires. Yamaha makes a bike called a TW200 that makes a great camp bike for new riders and is road legal.

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Leaving your boat unattended for a short bicycle shuttle shouldn't be a problem as long as you can lock it up. Shoshone on the Colorado is a good place to do this. The shuttle only takes 10-15 minutes, including time on the bike.


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For those that use a bike shuttle--easy enough to use a cable bike lock on your boat, but what about your paddle? Maybe some kind of padlock around the shaft? I'm thinking about places where there's no way I'm comfortably stashing a boat and paddle without it being locked up...
 

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When hitch hiking it is always a good idea to carry a beer, especially if you are a Kayaker or IK.
You see, everyone knows Kayakers will always take the last beer, so holding up your beer (instead of your thumb) should provide better results.

It also helps if you are wearing pants of some sort. While river folk will understand, they will also spot you for a Kayaker and may shy away from offering a ride. Non river folk will certainly be put off if you are less than clothed, even if you are holding a beer up.
 
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