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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After reading yet another preachy post about how "human waste doesn't belong in landfills" I ran across the following link:

How many diapers are required every day to satisfy the world consumption? | The Disposable Diaper Industry Source

The upshot is that around 30 - 40 million disposable diapers per day go into landfills in the US. There may be other reasons to ban the bag, but the "doesn't belong in landfills argument" is just preachy and stupid. Hell, a modern RCRA-regulated landfill, double lined and capped every day, is effectively a giant WAGG bag already.
 

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Funny thing is that in many wastewater plants, the heaviest solids are removed in the first step in the process and brought to a landfill. The remaining solids are then processed and disposed of in various ways, including being spread as fertilizer to grow hay.

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Funny thing is that in many wastewater plants, the heaviest solids are removed in the first step in the process and brought to a landfill. The remaining solids are then processed and disposed of in various ways, including being spread as fertilizer to grow hay.

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The above point about Diapers is a valid concern - but not an argument for Wag bags. If somebody else pollutes...does that mean you should too?

RE Wastewater. I depends on if you are talking about a combined system or not - BUT As a water scientist who studied wastewater in college....I'll go ahead and step in here and say that this is generally not true.

I could bury you in details, but the first step in influent treatment is removal of large solid materials and other materials that could damage downstream pumps. This is typically rocks, sticks, and other material. This is often called preliminary treatment. Some plants don't consider this part of the process because it can be done "off site". These removed materials are washed and transported to a landfill.

Next (Primary treatment) the influent is pumped into sedimentation tanks where lighter material (oil/grease & plastics) are skimmed (WASHED if solid) and sent to the landfill. Heavier materials - called primary sludge at this point - are sent downstream for secondary treatment.

The point is that solids removed to a landfill are not biological in nature. Biological wastes are concentrated into "biosolids" for use as fertilizer (NKP).

Wag bags have their place. I've used them before and probably will again. But if they end up in a landfill, you are doing the environment a disservice. I feel the same way about Diapers. Especially when a solution exists that allows the waste to enter a treatment facility (Ecosafe style toilets).
 

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Is there a better place to dispose of wag bags than the trash? Can they be disposed at RV dump stations without opening the bag?
 

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Good point, Austin.

This whole discussion about diapers, wag bags, and Ecosafe systems reminds me of the time I floated the White River and the most difficult part of the trip was finding enough space to put the Ecosafe groover where it, and the user's feet, wouldn't be right smack dab (literally) in a cowpie.

Yeah, it would be great if we could all make sure our waste went into a good groover and then a WWTP, but sometimes it's just not feasible - like kayak self support trips. And frankly, if I'm doing a one-boat overnighter, I'll be glad to pack it out in a wag bag rather than go through the hassle of bringing the Ecosafe along and then doing cleanout after one or two people have used it.

If we're going to preach, shouldn't we be having these friendly discussions with the folks that are still digging cat holes and having ground fires at campsites instead of those that are already using approved waste removal systems?

SYOTR,

-AH
 

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Approved for land fill disposal. I think the biggest reason the Westwater rangers discourage them is because some folks were disposing them into the pit toilets.

Sealed and treated properly with the 'poo powder', they are safe for dumpsters and ultimately dumps, pun intended. They biodegrade relatively quickly, unlike diapers...


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Right, glad you studied it in college. I personally shoveled shit every day for an entire summer. Called that job "grit and rags" because the system collects all the rags (used feminine products) and the grit (shit..with prominent yellow highlights... corn) in two piles. Shovel it into cans and bring it to the dump. The rest of the solids are processed to varying degrees. I can only speak to that facility but I can't imagine its the only one.


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And of all the toxic shit that goes into a landfill who cares about some diapers or rafter shit bags? I worked at a landfill during a summer in college too. Probably all be shocked at what you see there.

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
"If somebody else pollutes --- does that mean you should too?"

See what I mean about preachy? Your core premise is that modern landfills "pollute." Those days are long past.
 

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After reading yet another preachy post about how "human waste doesn't belong in landfills" I ran across the following link:

How many diapers are required every day to satisfy the world consumption? | The Disposable Diaper Industry Source

The upshot is that around 30 - 40 million disposable diapers per day go into landfills in the US. There may be other reasons to ban the bag, but the "doesn't belong in landfills argument" is just preachy and stupid. Hell, a modern RCRA-regulated landfill, double lined and capped every day, is effectively a giant WAGG bag al Totally, I got a partner, a coyote, and a pett, on westwater I use the waggs all the time, or upper colo.even the salt, 3 to 6 people the most I go with, so it works fine, I don't really find myself on large groups, but you know how that go's everybody's going, until your going, ready.
in other words I go down westwater once a month,call me .....970.390.0137 there,s alway's 2 seat's emtee,
 

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come to think about it, I ran over, (or got stuck on) a dead horse at the summit county dump ,good thing about drywall you can spread it around then you got something to walk on I don't like my shoes getting in that spou.
 

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If my old memory is somewhat correct, doesn't one of the take-outs on the John Day have a depository just for wags bags??? Sounds better than being dumped in the garbage dumpsters

happy paddling!
 

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Little bags of shit are thrown into every garbage can in every park or trailhead in colorado every day...
Exactly. I would like to know the difference between me disposing of my wag bags in the landfill and me cleaning up the dog shit in my backyard and dropping it in the dumpster..?..
 

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I'll start worrying about wag bags when diapers are eliminated from our lives. I had two kids. Nothing in a wag bag approaches what happens in a kids diaper.
 

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Unless you're dumpster diving at the take out, what's the issue with tossing the closed wagg bags in there? It all ends up at the same place.


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