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Looking to see your handwashing stations/storage or recommendations for what you like!

Thanks in advance :)
 

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Here is a system a friend showed me years ago. It works well - you dip the can in a bucket of clean water, hang it on the inside of a catch bucket or the outside to drain onto the ground, and let gravity and holes in the side of the can go to work. This is a fancy version - I riveted a piece of the lip of a plastic planting pot to the edge. There are ghetto solutions to hang it that can be improvised on the river, some requiring investment in a hose clamp or 3.

This design has some significant downsides, though:
1. If you are on a turbid SW river, there is no pump to clog, so you'll need to go for a walk or work on your boat instead of disassembling and cleaning your sand-filled bulb pump while everyone waits for dinner.
2. If you forget to bring it, you'll need to make another one on the river instead of driving 2 hours back to the nearest walmart.
3. If you have excess money, you won't be able to spend it on this because it is best made by digging a tomato sauce can out of the recycling bag.
4. You'll miss out on the key coordination exercise you get from pumping with your foot and washing your hands at the same time.
5. You won't be able to change the batteries or upload new software to upgrade it



 

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While I really appreciate my handwash station with the pump and spout, paulster's rig is a great way to go. I've used this kind of setup before, and love it. No moving parts, no clogging, stores compactly and easily, and works just as well as the fancy setup from the raft shop.
 

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I think you get better results according to the amount of effort. If I don't spend hours sourcing parts and pieces, it probably isn't an effective system. Where would you possibly find a can on the river if you forgot the one designated for hand washing. It is suggestions like this that are hurting society.
 

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You can use the bucket and can method and it works fine. I still prefer the "on demand" access that a foot pump provides. A marine fuel primer bulb, a few dollars in tube from the hardware store, one old wire hanger to support the tube and few zip ties and you can have a DIY wishy-washy.

Here is a link to the bulb
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Pactrade-Marine-Boat-Rubber-Fuel-Pump-Hand-Large-Primer-Bulb-Fuel-Hose-1-4-6mm/360056136?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=101003250&&adid=22222222227256805694&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=304410963585&wl4=pla-546619951600&wl5=9029827&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=139452648&wl11=online&wl12=360056136&veh=sem&gclid=CjwKCAjwi_b3BRAGEiwAemPNU-xUVGcvOPIJVNX_49pQ5_X7o8VwCPSzfpYEPCnAnJP53Cru_yU_dBoCNp4QAvD_BwE
 

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Here is a system a friend showed me years ago. It works well - you dip the can in a bucket of clean water, hang it on the inside of a catch bucket or the outside to drain onto the ground, and let gravity and holes in the side of the can go to work. This is a fancy version - I riveted a piece of the lip of a plastic planting pot to the edge. There are ghetto solutions to hang it that can be improvised on the river, some requiring investment in a hose clamp or 3.

This design has some significant downsides, though:
1. If you are on a turbid SW river, there is no pump to clog, so you'll need to go for a walk or work on your boat instead of disassembling and cleaning your sand-filled bulb pump while everyone waits for dinner.
2. If you forget to bring it, you'll need to make another one on the river instead of driving 2 hours back to the nearest walmart.
3. If you have excess money, you won't be able to spend it on this because it is best made by digging a tomato sauce can out of the recycling bag.
4. You'll miss out on the key coordination exercise you get from pumping with your foot and washing your hands at the same time.
5. You won't be able to change the batteries or upload new software to upgrade it



Your words and pictures confuse me...
 

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Here is a system a friend showed me years ago. It works well - you dip the can in a bucket of clean water, hang it on the inside of a catch bucket or the outside to drain onto the ground, and let gravity and holes in the side of the can go to work. This is a fancy version - I riveted a piece of the lip of a plastic planting pot to the edge. There are ghetto solutions to hang it that can be improvised on the river, some requiring investment in a hose clamp or 3.

This design has some significant downsides, though:
1. If you are on a turbid SW river, there is no pump to clog, so you'll need to go for a walk or work on your boat instead of disassembling and cleaning your sand-filled bulb pump while everyone waits for dinner.
2. If you forget to bring it, you'll need to make another one on the river instead of driving 2 hours back to the nearest walmart.
3. If you have excess money, you won't be able to spend it on this because it is best made by digging a tomato sauce can out of the recycling bag.
4. You'll miss out on the key coordination exercise you get from pumping with your foot and washing your hands at the same time.
5. You won't be able to change the batteries or upload new software to upgrade it



We have a similar setup but made a simple plywood hook that hangs on the bucket and holds the can up about 18inches higher. It's better for old backs. The one trouble we have with this system is that toddlers are fascinated with it so they drain the bucket pretty quickly.
 

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Here is a system a friend showed me years ago. It works well - you dip the can in a bucket of clean water, hang it on the inside of a catch bucket or the outside to drain onto the ground, and let gravity and holes in the side of the can go to work. This is a fancy version - I riveted a piece of the lip of a plastic planting pot to the edge. There are ghetto solutions to hang it that can be improvised on the river, some requiring investment in a hose clamp or 3.

This design has some significant downsides, though:
1. If you are on a turbid SW river, there is no pump to clog, so you'll need to go for a walk or work on your boat instead of disassembling and cleaning your sand-filled bulb pump while everyone waits for dinner.
2. If you forget to bring it, you'll need to make another one on the river instead of driving 2 hours back to the nearest walmart.
3. If you have excess money, you won't be able to spend it on this because it is best made by digging a tomato sauce can out of the recycling bag.
4. You'll miss out on the key coordination exercise you get from pumping with your foot and washing your hands at the same time.
5. You won't be able to change the batteries or upload new software to upgrade it
Yeah pretty cool. Until you wake up one morning and find 8 dead mice floating in your formerly semi-dirty water with cross contamination from all the ass scratchers who had to use their nasty ass hand to touch the can and put it in to your formerly clean water.

Two words. Hands Free. Try it. You might like it. Or wait until your whole trip comes down with ecoli or the corona or smallpox.
 

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Looking to see your handwashing stations/storage or recommendations for what you like!

Thanks in advance :)
I'm digging SDG River Gear's new hand washing station. Seems to be a riff on some of the suggestions posted here on Buzz but comes as a complete kit and the soap holder sets it apart from others. I think this will link you there:


- sheik
 
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