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Expert boaters running OarRights

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Discussion Starter #1
I'm just wondering how many expert boaters are running rights?. I really like them and don't see myself losing them even if I ever get "expert". Thanks for participating.


1 Yes
2 No
 

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YES- after decades of private and professional boating excursions, my left elbow is fucking shot...I use rights for guiding boats all day in the busy season. My oar is always in a positive position. and it's just about the only thing I can count on being consistent when floating with custys...If your technique relies heavily on feathering then I guess it's not for you, but I'm all about making life easier when pushing commercials.
 

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I have a friend who cut his Oar Rights down shorter. He pulls the oars out and turns them when he's not in a rapid so he can feather. In a rapid, he rolls them back into the locked position. I tried it once, but didn't care for it. All that feathering made my wrists sore. I did have some commercial guides who tried to get me away from my Oar Rights (Oar Wrongs they called them) but they were not successful. Maybe it's just what I've gotten used to over the years. They might be "wrong", but they're "right" for me.
 

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In my experience there are advantages to both however there are a few things that make me lean towards oar rights so I keep them on my boat and often row open in other people's.

My carpal tunnel/tennis elbow does act up when I'm not using them as well.
 

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I am not an expert boater so I didn't vote...however I do run rights...On Ruby/HT last weekend I definitely noted their downside when in fierce wind...amazing how much wind an oar can catch!
I'd like to keep my wrists from injury though so I'll keep running them...FWIW
 

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No expert but I hate them. Oar feathering is a real added power bonus and it is also advantageous in the wind as well. My oars barely leave the water on my big boat. They feel like handcuffs to me. That said, a lot of folks I run with use them
 

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Oar rights

Don't use them generally, but it's just personal preference, probably because that's how I learned to row. I love feathering my oars, even underwater sometimes just for fun..

I do think about using them sometimes when running a small cat in the IV-V stuff when a single missed stroke can be a problem. Still haven't made up my mind.

People get way too twisted up over this stuff. Give me a boat and I'll run it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Sorry, I probably shouldn't have used the word "expert". Please feel free to participate anyway. I know that beginners will nearly always use rights so there is no need to include beginners in the poll. The basis of my question is to find out if rights are supposed to be for beginners only and if I'm supposed to reach a point where I don't like them or don't need them. As I said in the orig post, I'm so comfortable with them that I don't see myself getting rid of them.
 

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I am not an expert whitewater rower, but spent a decade flat water rowing on the east coast and have whitewater rowed three seasons. Discovering oar rights on moving water was a game changer. Think how much you actually feather (which you can still do albeit with slightly less precision) vs. how much you actually stand or thrust your whole body's weight. On flat water (that doesn't move fight your every movement) they are not important because your motions are rhythmic, you want that fluid feathering, and there is not all that sudden force on your wrists. When you are going down a rapid with moving water pushing your blades around the oar rights make such a difference keeping the leveraging power as you shift your body weight by keeping the blades at that perfect vertical angle. This is especially clutch if you are not and expert whitewater boater.
 

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Sorry, I probably shouldn't have used the word "expert". Please feel free to participate anyway. I know that beginners will nearly always use rights so there is no need to include beginners in the poll. The basis of my question is to find out if rights are supposed to be for beginners only and if I'm supposed to reach a point where I don't like them or don't need them. As I said in the orig post, I'm so comfortable with them that I don't see myself getting rid of them.
Do what you like and what feels right for you. I don't think using Oar Rights has anything to do with whether you are a beginner or a long time rower.
 

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I cheated by getting the convertible oar rights so I can do both. Flip the tongue up when it's windy to be able to feather, and lick them down during all whitewater. Otherwise I'd go pure oar rights if I had to choose.


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There are oar rights now that the "keeper" or "key" is hinged and flips up and out of the way to allow either option.
I have for a long time disliked oar rights. I kind of thought of them as training wheels. This spring I floated the Grand and I think I rowed all but 5 miles of the trip. Anyway we rented boats from REO and they came equipped with Oar Rights. I was going to turn mine around as soon as I found that they were a hindrance. I actually ended up leaving them on and became very fond of them for that style of rowing. I am going to put the convertible style on a new white water set up I am putting together. I loved not missing any oar strokes when I couldn't afford to. But absolutely everyone's mileage will vary.


Jim
 

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Can't stand oar rights. So limiting. And when you get your oar caught in that big eddy behind a rock….good luck.

My wrists never hurt. Never even gotten tired and I feather a lot and don't work out when not rowing. At least upper body.

The only possible use I have heard of for oar rights is when surfing in a cat to be able to barely dip an oar for corrections without having it twist out of your hand. And that is a legit use. But I have no cat…..
 

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I do think about using them sometimes when running a small cat in the IV-V stuff when a single missed stroke can be a problem. Still haven't made up my mind.

People get way too twisted up over this stuff. Give me a boat and I'll run it.
This!!! Oar Rights, Pro-Loks or Pins and Clips when EVERY stroke counts!
 

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If I'm in the middle of a rapid and have an oar pop out, or whatever, I want to know that the next, potentially critical, stroke I make will be effective. Call 'em "training wheels" or whatever, I'll stick with the oar rights. That said, I may get some of the convertible ones so I can feather the oars when rowing flatwater against the breeze. Maybe if I'd learned with free oars I'd be proud and smug about free oars...

I don't know if I classify as "expert" but I get the idea.

-AH

(Chickenshit Boaters Association member in good standing)
 
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