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Hi, All,
I'm new to this forum, and need some advice. Have been rafting for over 20 years, but always on permitted rivers. Next week, rafting non-permitted river which means we can take our 3-year-old lab! Any advice for in camp; poop; in the boat, etc????
 

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Keep em out of poison ivy, clean up after them, don't let them annoy others, keep em safe on the water and enjoy!

And if like mine, keep them from ripping out of the tent : - )
 

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A few tips:
1. Human and dog poop can peacefully coexist in groovers if you don't want to throw poop away in the trash bag. Pick it up with a baggie, throw it in the groover, then toss the baggie in the trash.
2. Make a flat, secure space on the raft for the dog to sit/stand on or they're likely to drive you crazy.
3. Bring a glow-in-the-dark or light-up collar for the dog in camp, especially if the dog is dark or likes to patrol the camp perimeter.
4. Dog PFDs are great, but not all are created equal. My dogs dig the Underdog vest from MTI. It seems to be more comfortable both in water and on land.
5. If your dog REALLY likes water, trying to keep them dry before bed can be problematic. You may want to bring something for your tent to keep your sleeping bags from getting dirty/wet. We use an old duvet cover as a top sheet.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
A few tips:
1. Human and dog poop can peacefully coexist in groovers if you don't want to throw poop away in the trash bag. Pick it up with a baggie, throw it in the groover, then toss the baggie in the trash.
2. Make a flat, secure space on the raft for the dog to sit/stand on or they're likely to drive you crazy.
3. Bring a glow-in-the-dark or light-up collar for the dog in camp, especially if the dog is dark or likes to patrol the camp perimeter.
4. Dog PFDs are great, but not all are created equal. My dogs dig the Underdog vest from MTI. It seems to be more comfortable both in water and on land.
5. If your dog REALLY likes water, trying to keep them dry before bed can be problematic. You may want to bring something for your tent to keep your sleeping bags from getting dirty/wet. We use an old duvet cover as a top sheet.
Thanks! Those are the kind of tips I was looking for!
 

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I’ve been thru 2 dogs and have gotten both used to rapids. Life jacket is a must. I would also build something flat in the back of the captains seat with a pad on top. Until they are comfortable they will get real nervous up front. Definitely pick up their poop and put in grooved. My 2 have gone on every trip dogs were allowed. My newest 2 year old is so comfortable he has slipped overboard a couple times while napping. Good luck
 

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Sort of late for this advice, but it's a good idea to get the dog on the boat while they're young...or at least for several day runs before a multiday trip to make sure they get the feel for the water.

I've seen really nervous dogs on day 4 that the owners wished they had taken the time to acclimate...or figure out that the dog didn't like rafting.

Great advice from lisacanoes, especially for Labs. Maybe an intense game of fetch in the river before/during dinner so the dog gets tired enough to stay out and dry off before bed. OK, who am I kidding, it's a Lab. Bring quick dry blankets (and dog could have their own pack towel/chamois) and don't let them sleep on you!

We adopted two 9yo Labs two winters ago, didn't get them on the river last season, turns out they're great boat dogs.
58963

Our female didn't like sitting on the raft floor, preferred the paco pad. Male likes the floor and resting his chin on the tube.
They didn't like frequent minor splashes, but didn't mind the big hits. haha
 

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If there is a trail or at least a nongorged section let them run along side for a while. Best to train that first on a local run also.
 

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If you go with other folks, especially people without dogs, you might want to bring a separate ammo can for the dog's poop, instead of putting it in the peoples' groover.
 

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If you go with other folks, especially people without dogs, you might want to bring a separate ammo can for the dog's poop, instead of putting it in the peoples' groover.
I'd say it's 1000x more important to actively pick up the poop ... than to mix it with people poop.

I sorta get what you're saying, but I'd really rather not step in it. My poop the morning after a good Mexican dinner is WAY stinkier than dog poop on a normal day.
 

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I love doggies, I used to carry dog treats in my food box all the time, for the fluffy visitors. I was waiting to rig at the Pumphouse one time playing with someone else's dog and opened my food box to retrieve the dog treats. A boater walked over to me and started to give me shit about my dog barking(was not my dog) I didn't tell him that though. I basically told him to fuck off and mind his own business. Apparently the owners of the dog were just launching and called their dog to get into their boat. The boater that was trying to give me shit, look at me, than look at the group pushing off as the dog was hopping into a boat. I trust doggies more than people alot of times. Have fun with your four legged river companion's and remember shit happens, it's just comes down to how you want to handle it. PS, I carry a little three foot rake with three bent fingers on it, mainly to pick up human poop and toilet paper etc., but work's great for dog poop too. Dog poop I understand human poop and toilet paper is puzzling when you arrive in a new camp site.
 

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Definitely provide a flat place for them to ride. Top of cooler or dry box with a Paco pad on top works. Shade is good too especially when hot. My dog likes the land and on occasion will get in her head to abandon the raft. Beware when close to shore. Also get them accustomed to the PFD. Above all be responsible so we can continue to enjoy the rivers with our furry friends.
 

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A couple other ideas, is a flee and tick collar and spray. Along with trimming their nails, if they tear one out it will bleed and hurt like crazy, the shorter nails will be easier on your boat tubes too.
 

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Shapp
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Example of the flat setups with towel over cooler
58977


58978


or blue foam glued to top of cooler
58979


Also add some dog specific stuff to your first aid, gauze and leukotape works well for general bandages, talk to your vet and get a correct dosage instructions for over the counter antihistamine in case they get stung or bight/eat a wasp which a lot of dogs are good at doing. Keep a water bowl handy on the boat so they can drink at will. Pull over often for swimming when its hot. We've always had rescue dogs and luckily they have all loved going on the boat with out any training.
 

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Make sure the dog PFD has a good handle to grab them if they fall in. They cannot get in over the tubes and it will save many a stop.
 
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I have found the best way to get dogs in the boat is the get their front paws on the spare oar and hold forward pressure on the back of their neck. It allows them to climb in the boat under their own power and they don’t start the gyration that happens when picking them up by the handle like a suitcase.
 

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Hi, All,
I'm new to this forum, and need some advice. Have been rafting for over 20 years, but always on permitted rivers. Next week, rafting non-permitted river which means we can take our 3-year-old lab! Any advice for in camp; poop; in the boat, etc????
 
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