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oar litter

Yes. You can make a litter out of oars, sticks, etc...and it will work for shorter distances over non-technical terrain. Handholds can be a little dificult though for 6 people, which is realhy what you need to carry a person any sort of distance safely. However, over any sort of technical terrain (side canyon hikes, jumbled boulders, ledges) a trip or stumble can flip your patient right out of the litter and cause futher injury. Whatever you decide to do, test it, make an evac plan including route, have a trail spotter, have a litter lead, and be willing to make adjustments.

As has been said before, getting professional help coming to you with the appropriate supplies and gear (basket litter/wheel) is paramount. But at times, you need to move your patient to an appropriate evacuation spot or need to start heading towards help if time is of the essence. But yes, in most circumstances, it is better to stay put and wait for the pros rather than attempt a risky carry out with inadequate supplies and resources.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
thanks folks. Great information from a spectrum of folks to whom I'm grateful for sharing their input and knowledge. The information is helpful to me and hopefully to others as well. take care.
Russ
 

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evac liter & camp table & raft bench

Check out SDG River Gear's nesting camp tables. They have cutouts strategically placed for using a folded table as a liter board in an emergency situation. Great piece of multi-purpose kit - kitchen camp table, liter board, gear or passenger deck on raft.
 

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I have a background in SAR and EMS. There are many tools to use and the SKED is one of them I have employed many times over the years. There is too many variables and there is not “one size fits the bill” for any rescue. I have my long table as a backboard and I carry what is known in the industry as a “mega mover” it’s basically a big sturdy fabric with straps sewn on for carry handles. It packs small is light and can be used as a small kitchen floor if needed. They are inexpensive we discard them with the patient so if one does not get gross on a flight I take it home wash it and keep it as my go to lightweight litter. Throw a couple oars through the loops and you can work even easier. If you have friends in EMS they might be able to get you one for nothing.
 

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I will not get into the first aid aspects, we all know the training we should have or better yet invite some medical professionals on the trip.
The best way to transport a patient that I have used is to take two poles, oars work really well, remove blades, take three to four jackets, zip them up and slide the oars/poles up the sides from the bottom of the first jacket and out the sleeves, repeat covering the sleeves of the first jacket with the body of the second, etc, etc. The jackets surprisingly will not unzip and allow four people to carry the stretcher or two in narrow situations.
Place something under the knees of the patient as this takes a lot of strain off their back.

In rough terrain you can create space between the jackets to tie the patient onto the stretcher. If you have to transport them by boat, remove the straps. Never have anyone tied into anything on the water. Shouldn't need to be said but I have done stupider things in stressful situations.
Stay Safe
 
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