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I am a newbie in a kayak and was wondering what type of drybag everyone uses for overnight trips to keep sleeping bags and clothes dry (Size of bag, and Brand). Whether you are in a raft or a kayak. I was looking into the "Teva Exopod Dry Bag - 65 Liters" for trips with raft support since it is so large, but was wondering if it would fit in a kayak, and if not what to use for kayak trips without raft support. I'm obviously looking for something waterproof or something as close too waterproof as possible. Has anyone used the "Teva Exopod Dry Bag - 65 Liters"??? I appreciate the advise! This is my first overnight trip and want to get it right! Any other advise as what to pack and what not to pack would also be greatly appreciated!


Thanks, cheers!!

-Nick:mrgreen:
 

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If yer gonna spend 150.00 on a dry bag get a watershed. they are 100% reliable, rubber ziplock style closure, or just get a friggin 60.00 nrs bills bag. I would trust a watershed in a "wrap" for hours to keep stuff dry, like an I-pod, or sleeping bag on a winter grand canyon trip. I had a mississippi watershed(huge) for 4 yrs and its great stuff
 

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Funny enough I was looking into dry bags today. I am going to Nepal next month and was looking into watershed ditch bag w/ the zipper. I really like that it has the backpack feature, but I'm concerned about the durability of the zipper. Does anyone have any experience with watersheds ditch bag?
 

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I have been happy with my Watershed Futa as far as dry bag that will fit in back of the boat, had mine for a couple years and very happy. I like you can still inflate it for use a float bag in addition to carrying gear for safety purposes. I can get most of my soft goods/kitchen gear in it, and use the Watershed Ocoee for the rest. I agree they are heavier, but the performance has justified the extra weight for me so far.

It all depends on the length of trip as to how I pack. For a simple over night I just make sure I have food, warm clothes, and some sort of shelter. Of course the liquid libation and all your standard "safety meeting" materials are what really ensure you have a good time and there is always room to make sure those supplies are in the boat.....
 

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River Gypsy
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I use watershed bags for my camera (nice digiSLR rig), video camera, and all of my overnighter gear. Andria and I probably have about 10 of them that we've accumulated over the years. On many overnighters (multiple Middle Forks, Grand Canyon, ect.) and through all of the daily use, we've only ever had one blow out. It was one that I had been using maybe 80-100 days per year for 3-4 years with my camera in it. It had the old stiffer zipper on it (the bag was about 6 years old but lightly used at first), which I think caused stress on the bag fabric right where the zipper attached, and it blew out when I pulled really hard opening it. The newer ones seem to be a big improvement in this area, using a bend and pull method that reduces the stress at that spot. I don't hesitate to stow my gear or camera in there, and the one I use now is holding up nicely after 2 solid years of use.

I remember when I switched to Watersheds from other bags, it took me a couple of years before I finally quit putting my sleeping bag inside a garbage bag before I put it in the drybag. The Watershed is all you need, and I've never had anything get so much as slightly damp. After using the Colorados for a long time, we recently added one of the backpack models, and I highly recommend it. It's easier to pack, easier to close, and easier to carry around.

Leland
 

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I use watershed bags for my camera (nice digiSLR rig), video camera, and all of my overnighter gear. Andria and I probably have about 10 of them that we've accumulated over the years. On many overnighters (multiple Middle Forks, Grand Canyon, ect.) and through all of the daily use, we've only ever had one blow out. It was one that I had been using maybe 80-100 days per year for 3-4 years with my camera in it. It had the old stiffer zipper on it (the bag was about 6 years old but lightly used at first), which I think caused stress on the bag fabric right where the zipper attached, and it blew out when I pulled really hard opening it. The newer ones seem to be a big improvement in this area, using a bend and pull method that reduces the stress at that spot. I don't hesitate to stow my gear or camera in there, and the one I use now is holding up nicely after 2 solid years of use.

I remember when I switched to Watersheds from other bags, it took me a couple of years before I finally quit putting my sleeping bag inside a garbage bag before I put it in the drybag. The Watershed is all you need, and I've never had anything get so much as slightly damp. After using the Colorados for a long time, we recently added one of the backpack models, and I highly recommend it. It's easier to pack, easier to close, and easier to carry around.

Leland

remember you gotta use 303 every now and then on the zippers, sunblock works also........thats why it broke or user error. I'm no smart ass just follow directions...............................................
 

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Anybody remember when watershed was Man Of Rubber. They were the best then too. I have a really old, big man of rubber that blew out on the side panel. Watershed would not fix or warranty it but they did give me a real good deal on a Mississippi.
 

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River Gypsy
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remember you gotta use 303 every now and then on the zippers, sunblock works also........thats why it broke or user error. I'm no smart ass just follow directions...............................................
I religiously 303 them. With the old thick closures that had the lip on the zipper (before the loop tabs) you pulled them straight open without bending. What that did was cause them to sometimes pop open suddenly as you pulled, yanking on the point where the zipper was welded to the bag. As I said above, it was a problem confined to the much older bags (like back before 2000), and it was only a problem with smaller bags from what I saw. It has been fixed nicely with the newer ones that have the loop tabs and bend/pull opening. I worked for Watershed a bit back in 1999, so I'm pretty sure I'm checked out on how to operate the bags.

L
 

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River Gypsy
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Anybody remember when watershed was Man Of Rubber. They were the best then too. I have a really old, big man of rubber that blew out on the side panel. Watershed would not fix or warranty it but they did give me a real good deal on a Mississippi.
Those were nice bags for sure, but they took a big step forward when Jim & Eric bought the company and switched to RF welding instead of gluing the seams. The Man of Rubber ones would come unglued from time to time. With the RF welded seams, there's no chance of them coming undone or ever leaking. Welding doesn't break down over time like glue does.

L
 

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Leland and all are correct that Watersheds are top notch, but there is another dry/stowe bag out there that very few are aware of because of lack of marketing and to be honest, I feel they are the "new" best in the market product. It's the Gaija "ultimate" and it's not cheap, but I think cheaper then the Futa's.

Here are the key winners for me with this:
My guess is 1/3 the weight of a Futa
Has a zipper system as opposed to the traditional fold down which makes for much easier access.
Still has a valve for inflating when just being used as floatation.
Super dry... I have used them for 3 overnighters this summer and never had even a drop of water in them. Yes, they have been through 3 swims this season and still, not a drop.
Did I say light!!! VERY LIGHT...
 

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I am surprised nobody mentioned these

http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.asp?pfid=2972

The NRS sea stow. Don't know what other names they are marketed under, but I have a few of these. A couple of them are close to 17 years old, when I started boating. Never had a leak. Used to carry my camera in one in my kayak and when I started yakking I swam a fair amount with never a worry.

Also had one that was on a raft ( not mine ) that wrapped and it was submerged for an hour or so without leaking.

What I especially like about these is the slick nylon finish slides in and out of a kayak really easily. They also go flatter than a more tubular style.

I always make sure to have a little air in the bag and a couple of rolls on the closure and you are good to go.
 

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Watershed Hands Down. Next Best is Jacks Plastic Welding. Any thing else is only a dry bag in name. On the river nothiing else stays dry very long.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks Everyone!!

Everyone who replied,

Thanks alot for all of the information! I appreciate it! It is very helpful! Hopefully I'm ready now!

Cheers!

-Nick
 

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Leland and all are correct that Watersheds are top notch, but there is another dry/stowe bag out there that very few are aware of because of lack of marketing and to be honest, I feel they are the "new" best in the market product. It's the Gaija "ultimate" and it's not cheap, but I think cheaper then the Futa's.

Here are the key winners for me with this:
My guess is 1/3 the weight of a Futa
Has a zipper system as opposed to the traditional fold down which makes for much easier access.
Still has a valve for inflating when just being used as floatation.
Super dry... I have used them for 3 overnighters this summer and never had even a drop of water in them. Yes, they have been through 3 swims this season and still, not a drop.
Did I say light!!! VERY LIGHT...
Where do you get these? I found:
Gaia Sports*::*drybags
but there aren't any zipper bags there, or maybe I am just blind.
 

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Raftus....

Here is the link. Apparently comes with some type of big warranty too.

Jackson works a lot with Gaia, but honestly I don't have a single tie to them for any reason.

This is without a doubt the best floatation/stowe bag you can get currently. I have used them all and although a bit spendy, it's really light, really dry...

Gaia Sports :: flotation :: stow floats :: 30" ultimate stow float
 

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Another vote for Watershed. 303 the seal every so often and it will open and close just how it ought and not otherwise. I've had the Mississippi and the Futa for a long time, and neither has ever leaked. The big one kept my stuff bone dry while underwater for quite a while when my bro flipped an 18 foot bucket boat in Crystal a few years back.
 

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I like the water resistant, Camp Inn stuff bags, with a hefty bag. They're light and solid for someone who doesn't want the weight. Watershed bags are bomber but heavy. You don't need much to keep your stuff dry, and they're only 15 dollars. Can go from 3 1/2 to 10 ozs changing out dry bags.
 
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