Mountain Buzz banner
181 - 200 of 217 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,036 Posts
Discussion Starter · #181 ·
(top) is what they looked like after 14 years of use/abuse.
60992


Then they got the blades thinned and square tops in 2018.
60993


60994


Middle three.

I say go for it. You'll be surprised at how strong wood is.

My newest dory oars (left) are 2" at the rope wraps and 1 5/8" at the necks, and not quite flexible enough. The 9.5' oars on the right are closer to 1 7/8 continously and too stiff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,036 Posts
Discussion Starter · #182 ·
Stole your FB pic:
60995


In my "current" prevailing wisdom, I'd have left them that shape with the shaft oblong and would put the blade vertical in this pic--you get strength perpendicular to the blade face and reduce weight parallel to the blade where you need no stiffness....what Culler advised.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I am 100% aware of this! Haha.
If I make another set, they will be full oars. I tripped on my last trip and broke a blade. So my theory was that because I’m in shallow technical east coast stuff, I wanted to be able to trash a blade and not the whole oar, which consumed my life for a whole month and a half while I made it. But...you’re right. The next set will be full
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,036 Posts
Discussion Starter · #190 ·
Nicely done on the oars! Very professional looking, and tie nicely into the couplers. People will think Sawyer made them.

I like that workbench!
I'd been resistant to doing a really pretty one and then spilling epoxy on it. Which holdfasts? Do you use them much?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
thanks!!!
The work bench is pretty simple (low budget). It’s 4” of plywood. It’s ok...the plywood doesn’t like hold fasts because they split it. Use a solid wood for the top layer. If I re-do it some day, I’ll make it 2.5” thick. The hold fasts are AWESOME. I use them every day and I got them from Gramercy Tool in NYC. Don’t do the cast hold fasts...get forged (mega expensive) or these extruded ones (like $20 each). I have loved them. Best work bench tool ever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,036 Posts
Discussion Starter · #192 ·
Thanks. I appreciate knowing the ply doesn't hold holdfasts. Was considering that or a big glulam to make a quick/easy top instead of gluing one up.

Will probably forge my own holdfasts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
If you use them a lot, plywood is not good. For the few holes I use most, I routed out a recess and put a peice of oak in there. I have seen a lot of guys use cheap 2x4 laminated together tall way up for the bench top. But 2-3” is ideal. 4” got a bit thick. 2.5” provides a great hold
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
They do look awesome!

A question for you oarmakers.
I took an 11' dimensional 6X6 beam out of a house I was remodeling recently.
Turns out it was Alaskan yellow cedar.
Probably more than 100 years old.
Tight and clear.
Would that wood be a good candidate for some oars?
Looks like fun to build a set or 10.
Thanks for any info.

--SpoonMan--
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I'm gonna give it a try. In reading about AYCedar, it sounds like it's not quite as strong as doug fir. I'm thinking I can be a little less aggressive with my shaft taper and negate that issue. My other concern was how well it will take epoxy. There are a few conflicting articles and blogs but overall it sounds like many boatbuilders laminate it with epoxy just fine. They describe leaving a little "tooth" from the tablesaw in the glue joint. Another plus for me, as I'll be working with a contractor table saw not a cabinet saw and no jointer. I'm a carpenter by trade but my tools are mostly jobsite tools. I'll post some pics when I get rolling.

MT4 and others, thanks for all of your postings here. It's just about all the info I need and the most comprehensive I've found.

Cheers,

--SpoonMan--
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,036 Posts
Discussion Starter · #198 ·
AYC is pretty amazing wood. Up there with Sitka Spruce and Port Orford Cedar.

Trim the shaft narrower at the shoulders but leave it thick perpendicular to the face of the blade.
 

·
Renaissance *******
Joined
·
1,395 Posts
Okay I've stayed off this thread as long as I could because I have enough damn projects but I'm headed up to my in-laws cabin near the boundary waters next week where I've got access to a big pile of ash that they had milled years ago from their property and it's just piled in the garage now. The problem is that we're traveling in a Subaru this year. But now I kind of like Matt's interchangeable blade design. I figure I can rough them out there and just haul a few seven or eight foot shafts back. I happen to have a couple of sets of Carlisle oar extensions that I'll use. If it doesn't work out I figure all I wasted was a couple of vacation days drinking beer in their garage. I'll post some pictures when I get up there I might have questions about grain and stuff. Cheers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,036 Posts
Discussion Starter · #200 ·
If the wood is fully cured out and isn't likely to warp any farther, I'd cut it about 2.5" x 2.5". 2" is my go-to with straight clear wood, but you don't know what kind of stress may have built up within a plank and you'll need to be able to remove wood on the high side to compensate for any stress warping

Grain--just make sure no grain physically crosses the oar shaft. You could get away with "grain runout" that crosses the shaft over the course of 2' or more...but if there's any more diagonal than that, skip it.
Or if you can cut your staves out of a wider slab of wood, follow the grain instead of cutting parallel to the edge...again to minimize grain runout.

Couplers--I'd skip the Carlisle extensions. It's not easy to bond wood/epoxy to aluminum. I'd seek out a busted fiberglass Cataract or Sawyer shaft and chop some couplers out of that.

Can you carry the shafts on the roof of the Suby? If so, go for 10' pieces...you might want 'em in a year or two and easier to bring them back now! It does make sense to do the rough shaping there...ash is HEAVY, and leaving the shavings up there will save you some weight.

Do they have power tools or will you be using a drawknife/spokeshave/plane (if so, take a good sharpening stone...ash is also TOUGH and needs sharp tools)
 
181 - 200 of 217 Posts
Top