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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am getting some contradictory reports about fire pans in Dinosaur N.P. I have a permit for Gates of Lodore. The two stories that I have heard are:

1. Oil change pans are OK, use rocks to prop them off the ground. Easy, but not strictly in compliance by the rules, my oil pan is 225 sq in, not the 250 sq in that the rules call for. You may be depending on the ranger being not too strict, and I hate to count on things like that.

2. You should get a real fire pan, with legs.

As a canoeist, the huge fire pans carried on rafts are not realistic. There is a Partner Steel Mini Fire Pan available, telescopes to make it smaller. I would still need to make legs for it, although the ad for it suggests rocks to keep it off the ground.

I am not too concerned about the fire blankets, I have some welding blankets that should do.

I searched the forums, and found very little on this topic, mostly discussions about groovers.

Thanks in advance,
Richard
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The problem is that when I called the Dinosaur River office they suggested renting a standard fire pan. When my buddy called a couple of weeks before he was told not to worry, they weren't that strict, use rocks to get it off the ground.

So that is the contradictory information......

Yes, I could make my own fire pan, but I would rather not. ;-)

Richard
 

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I can tell you that when I went they weren't that strict. we did use the oil pan and they even let us use a coleman porta-potty instead of an eco. that was before the fire blanket req though. I know there's been a lot of differing stories on this board about Lodore. they were thorough with us but didn't have any issues with our less than standard gear at the time. I would think with a canoe trip and just telling them you don't plan on using it should be ok. good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Clever Fire Pan

Pretty clever, NGeoym. Very compact, two piece pan, good legs, even includes a grille. What gauge did you use for the pan itself? I am going to guess 14ga or 16ga. I notice that the commercial mini fire pan was 14 ga.

I did get a private email that indicated that the oil pan with rocks should be OK, so I may just go that route for this trip

Richard
 

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It's 14ga. After reading what you wrote I don't know if it is big enough either. At 12*15 assembled its only 180 inches^2, you said 250. I know it works on the San Juan though, as we used it there.
 

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According to the 2010 Boating Requirements:



  • "Fire pans must be elevated a minimum of 4 inches off the ground. Fire pans must be a minimum size of 250 square inches with at least a 3-inch rim.
  • A fireproof tarp or blanket must be carried and placed under the fire pan. It must be of sufficient size to catch coals and ashes around the fire pan. Kayaks or canoes without raft support may substitute a gas stove."
If you are in doubt, call the river office (take note of who you spoke with/ date/time, etc.). A good faith effort on your part will go a long way with the rangers.



And, I'd give anything to watch you canoe Triplett and HHM :lol:​
 

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sandbar manufacturing fire pan

As a canoeist, the huge fire pans carried on rafts are not realistic. There is a Partner Steel Mini Fire Pan available, telescopes to make it smaller. I would still need to make legs for it, although the ad for it suggests rocks to keep it off the ground.

.

Thanks in advance,
Richard
Richard,

I am a kayaker, rafter and open boater.

I have one of the big recretech fire pans for the raft and it is big time heavy. It does the job just weights a ton! Looking for lighter weight fire pan, I purchased one of the partner steel mini pans as well. It works but balancing it on stones is required to get it off the ground and is sketchy at best. I like it, but the version I have is rusting big time.

I am getting ready for a canoe trip and needed a fire pan for exactly the same reasons you mention.

I just purchased a firepan made by Sandbar Manufacturing just for my canoe trips. I suspect I will end up taking it on most of my raft trips as well due to the light weight (equals more ice for Corona's). The pan is made out of stainless steel is on legs and looks like it meets the ranger requirements. Should last for ever. Check it out at
Ultra-portable camping, rafting, and outdoor cooking products.
 

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That looks like an awesome firepan. How much did it cost? Did you buy directly from Sandbar or through someone else. I need a firepan that will fit two 12in. dutch ovens side by side. Not sure they'll fit in the Sandbar firepan at 20 X 15 in. Hmmmm.
KJ
 

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I use a old table top grill that once used the small green propane bottles. It has a lid, the legs fold up to hold the lid on and keep it 4 inches off the ground. It has removable grills for when you want a fire, that also work awesome when you add brickets to grill. You can put the lid upside down and use it with a 10 inch dutch (suported with rocks). With brickets in the grill you can put the lid on and use it as a oven, for patato's. I just picked up a second one at a thrift shop for 3 dollars. I just took out the regulator and use it as a fire pan. I take it camping for no trace camping. I keep everything I need inside it, fire blanket, hatchet, paper, grill brush, tongs, and starter fluid. It will fit in a small bag. Like this one. I have had 8 people sitting around it just fine
http://www.cooking.com/products/shprodde.asp?SKU=703649
 
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