Mountain Buzz banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The family and I got invited on a Deso/Grey trip middle/late August. This will be our first time in the area. I here bugs are bad, but should be less bad in August. Anything we should know before we go? Anything we should bring that we might not bring on other trips?

Thanks.


Sent from my iPhone using Mountain Buzz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
It's VERY HOT!!! Carry all your water. You can filter water at Rock Creek but thats about it. Bring Charcoal for cooking. No natural wood fires allowed (Usually) that time of year but charcoal is permitted. The skeeters are usually gone at Sand Wash buy August or at least much reduced. Afternoon up canyon winds can be troublesome. It's an awesome canyon with great stuff to explore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,261 Posts
Mid-August is normally relatively minor for mosquitos and flies.

Bloody hot, low water and fewer people. We often spend the first day walking and floating beside our boat in the river to stay cool.

Three Fords has one of the bigger punches of the trip.

Enjoy your trip.

Phillip
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
Did one Aug 8 trip

And the bugs ate us alive until the half-way point. I mean alive.

100 - 105 degrees every day. We tried to be off-river by 1 in the afternoon to find shade.

It was a good trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,919 Posts
If your family includes kiddos,

depending on age and other things, could be very difficult to keep them comfortable on Deso in mid to late August
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,453 Posts
My opinion. Get a screened building at the putin. Bring head nets in case. Avoid poisoning yourself with Deet etc. Bring good shade for your camps, a bimini on your raft and a long sleeved white cotton shirt. Swimming in the rio addresses the heat nicely. Its dry heat. Not that big a deal. Did the San Juan in August last year with 5 families with little kids. No bugs of course but it was a fantastic trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
every whitewater site says the road and mosquitos are terrible. But reality is road to sand wash is new and really nice and few to no mosquitos. Get there kinda earlier in the day, unload gear, get boats in water and go grab a screened camp site before all the commercial groups take over. Enjoy joe hutch and bring lots of water
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,261 Posts
every whitewater site says the road and mosquitos are terrible. But reality is road to sand wash is new and really nice and few to no mosquitos. Get there kinda earlier in the day, unload gear, get boats in water and go grab a screened camp site before all the commercial groups take over. Enjoy joe hutch and bring lots of water
The road changes weekly during the monsoon, though I am not sure I would ever call it new in the last ten years. If its been grated and average weather it can be a relative cruise. That said, if its been raining a lot and the oil trucks are using their chains the driving can be abysmally slow. We go 1-2 times a year and its never the same (last fall was great, last summer slow and rugged). I no longer drive down there with passenger rated tires after seeing how many rigs have punctured multiple tires in one trip. You will be best served with a medium to high clearance vehicle as the last bit is actually in the Wash and can have some navigation issues with low ground clearance. More than once we have zig-zagged through a flowing wash and around new boulders in the main "road". Enjoy it when its a breeze go prepared for an epic.

That said...its likely to get a bit worse this year if they keep laying off oil rig folks because of the price crash. That area has seen several boon and bust cycles in the pasts and the roads are largely better right now because of the amount of $$ being dropped into region from extraction. Its not likely any of those fields will be operating at full capacity for a while so I would wager it will have an affect on the access roads' reliability.

Phillip
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,919 Posts
I agree the road (if you drove slow), was ok. Trip was mid June.

We got to the put in early after lunch.

Down by the river biting mosquitoes swarmed in big time. I have several BWCA trips and these Utah bugs make the State Bird of MN look like a pickup basket ball team playing NBA all stars. I had on a head net and serious deet on my hands. Long sleeve thick material shirt and pants tucked into thick sox. Wanted hands free to rig the raft. If I stopped moving my hands bugs would look like fur on my arms. Would not believed it had I not been there.

Trip leader had reserved us two screened in shelters up on top (do not get the ones down the hill). These shelters are a must have if camping there.

Next day we were up at daybreak. Quick breakfast of coffee and danish and off we went. Bugs were a problem during final rigging and when the rafts stopped even middle of the river. We checked out a bunch of camps but finally found fewer bugs a good distance down stream.

We had several screened in cook tarp setups which I recommend. We had camp bug issues on the top part. Not a problem on the lower.

I really enjoyed that river. We had the spring flood CFS and not much rowing, just a steering stroke here and there. Have not been back due to the bugs. If I did go back I would have a full body mesh bug suit setup
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
525 Posts
Bugs are bad at the put-in, better down river, and usually not so bad by August. Wife and I used a mosquito net over two Roll-o-cots, very comfy.

Bears in some campsites last year, plan accordingly for food and trash. Found some camps on sand bars with a nice evening breeze. We set up chairs and umbrellas in the water when the heat got real bad. Look out for campsites with southwest facing cliffs, they become ovens and radiate heat all night.

The fly back shuttle is great, awesome flight over the canyon. Get the screen cabins at the put-in or wish you did. I usually need to wear a head net while rigging.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
525 Posts
I wouldn't consider an august trip on Deso without an umbrella or bimini top for the boat. You will need some portable shade that can be quickly dropped when the wind blows. A trigger sprayer is nice for misting each other in the heat.

Dutch ovens and BBQ cooking suck in 100 degree heat, cook should get hazard pay to work over hot coals. Heavy meals were not popular in the heat, cold pasta salad was a big lunch hit. Hydration can be tough, we bring electolytes and mix them up with juice at breakfast. Note: hydration is serious, too much alcohol and not enough water in that heat got one of our group very sick very fast.

River is too silty for filters, bring drinking water. Settle river water overnight in buckets for dishes and bathing.

Great trip, worth the bugs and heat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
My understanding of the mosquito pattern on Deso/Grey is they are most prevalent after the river drops leaving breeding pools. So the most predictable misery typically occurs after the spring runoff peak as the river is dropping. These bouts only last so long. But obviously you could get a rain induced spike then drop that could encourage a mosquito breakout. All of my Deso trips have either been before the runoff peak or well after and I have yet to experience the reported mosquitos of "biblical proportions" Green River phenomenon.

As for sun, several of my boating friends have found River Sombreros to be a great addition for Deso trips.

River Sombrero - Shade for Rafts!

They can pop them up and down (too much wind? you don't won't to keep even the ones with the strongest fittings up in heavy Deso wind) very easily. Raft passengers tend to love them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
My 2 cents on Water - I start with enough for 3 - 4 days. There are enough creeks from Rock Creek (approx mile 40) on to filter rest of trip needs without complete refill. I've had it with settled river water and won't do that again unless I have to. I don't like alum, and there can be pollutants in Green River water that are not caught by filters.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top