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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My buddy just picked up a raft off craigslist with an NRS Bighorn frame that's just a little too big for the boat. Does anyone have any suggestions to shorten it up? We were considering just sawing off around 12in off the frame, but wanted to see if there would be any concerns with that or if anyone had any better ideas.
 
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Wood blade in chop saw is what the professionals use. Eye and ear protecting is mandatory and a place to nuke with Al chips.
 

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No issue - us normal people (not a professional / below average DIYer) have had to do that too. If reducing width need to come up with good system for drilling low pro screw holes.
This is quite simple.

Measure down the male part of the fitting and locate the distance from center of hole to shoulder. Replicate the mark on the outside of the tubing you intend to install on, centerpunch the center of the hole you intend to drill, drill with your favorite drill and drill motor, only one hole. Insert the lopro fitting, and align the hole you just drilled with the hole in the fitting, reinsert drill, drill the hole thru the fitting into the other side to complete the perforation. Remove any burrs and chamfer with a countersink or other deburring tool, Install appropriate bollt, hopefiully stainless with a nylock nut, and you're good to go.
 

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This is quite simple.

Measure down the male part of the fitting and locate the distance from center of hole to shoulder. Replicate the mark on the outside of the tubing you intend to install on, centerpunch the center of the hole you intend to drill, drill with your favorite drill and drill motor, only one hole. Insert the lopro fitting, and align the hole you just drilled with the hole in the fitting, reinsert drill, drill the hole thru the fitting into the other side to complete the perforation. Remove any burrs and chamfer with a countersink or other deburring tool, Install appropriate bollt, hopefiully stainless with a nylock nut, and you're good to go.
This is how i have done it too. Only problem i had was getting the opposite side lo-pro on the same plane. I ended up drilling and attaching one lo-pro, then attaching it to the side rail on a table, while fitting the yet to be drilled lo-pro to another side rail laying on the same plane/table, then marking/drilling. Maybe that makes sense? If there's a better way i'd like to hear it, because a few are skewed ever so slightly, which isnt noticable after tightening up, but i still don't like...
 

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This is how i have done it too. Only problem i had was getting the opposite side lo-pro on the same plane. I ended up drilling and attaching one lo-pro, then attaching it to the side rail on a table, while fitting the yet to be drilled lo-pro to another side rail laying on the same plane/table, then marking/drilling. Maybe that makes sense? If there's a better way i'd like to hear it, because a few are skewed ever so slightly, which isnt noticable after tightening up, but i still don't like...
That's easy too. make a simple centering jig out of a couple pieces of wood, or a big piece of wood with a "V" cut in the middle. Drill a hole thru the wood at the apex of the "V" (or use a ready made centering jig like the ones that come with combination squares)

It's the center piece you're going to use out of the above. Put your pencil in the apex, and with the tubing secured to your table with a clamp, lay the centering jig on it's side, and drag one leg against the pipe, draw a center-line all the way down your pipe. You may have to practice a couple times to get it down pat, but it works really well, and you now have a center line all the way down your pipe that's totally paralell.

You can also do this with a simple block of wood about the thickness of half of the pipe, tape a pencil to it, or drill a hole in it for the pencil, restrain the pipe movement and slide it down the table with the pencil in contact with the pipe, you'll have a center-line. It doesn't specifically have to be anywhere in particular on the pipe, it just has to be straight from one end to the other. Use the center-line (and use a center punch to dimple the pipe) and proceed as I laid out in my earlier post.

Use a pencil, if you screw it up, you can always wipe the graphite off the tubing, and try again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wow this is great info! I really appreciate everybody's great responses. I think he's just looking to shorten the length for now, but good to have this info if he ever wants to reduce the width as well.

Thanks!
 

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If you're anywhere near Buena Vista I've got the saw for your job.

As far as aligning a new hole with a previous one, or just making a good mark on both ends of new tube, just lay the tube up on a work bench against a wall with the first hole looking at you. Get a small piece of 1 by something and a pencil, put the pencil on top of the 1 by and turn the tube to line with the pencil. Slide you newly built "jig" to the other end and mark.
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A drill press will make part two of the process much simpler.
 
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