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What are your thoughts on having two 65 qt vs. One 150 at? I know there is 20 more at in the 150!

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potentialy more ice efficient if you can keep one closed till first one is empty of food and or beer. Tape around the lid and double insulate second cooler with wet towels, cheapo foam sleeping pad, paco pad, whatever you can come up with, drane every day and you might come out ahead.
 

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I use two coolers instead of one larger cooler, they fit my boat better.

One large cooler has a better surface to volume ratio and will keep ice longer than two small coolers for typical everyday use.

However, with a two cooler system you can pack one as a cooler and one as a freezer using dry ice. The daily cooler gets opened and closed as needed. The freezer gets taped shut until day 3 or 4 of a trip. In this way I can serve Popsicles in the desert on day 3 and still have ice left at the takeout day 7.

Packing a single cooler with dry ice is less effective. Stuff that shouldn't get frozen, like lettuce, gets destroyed and opening and closing the lid for daily access wastes the dry ice.
 

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I'd go for whatever fit the boat setup the best. A freezer and a fridge box is great but really with today's high end coolers a week plus is a chip shot keeping ice. On the other hand, with cheap boxes 20 more quarts of ice vs having a dedicated freezer might be an interesting experiment.

If you insulate the dry ice with newspaper and a layer of ice on the bottom, your veggies should be safe on the top.

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I'd go for whatever fit the boat setup the best. A freezer and a fridge box is great but really with today's high end coolers a week plus is a chip shot keeping ice. On the other hand, with cheap boxes 20 more quarts of ice vs having a dedicated freezer might be an interesting experiment.

If you insulate the dry ice with newspaper and a layer of ice on the bottom, your veggies should be safe on the top.

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I've never encountered this issue but I would think the problem is not freezer burn but would be the CO2 released by the dry ice ...
 

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As far as what? I was just giving a tip so kengore would stop freezing his lettuce.

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With either our 120 qt or 165 qt Igloo coolers, we use 1.5'' foam for a divider and 3/4'' foam for a lid and make 1/3 of our cooler a freezer w/ the pre-made and frozen meals and margs stored in there with dry ice at the start of the trip.
We keep veggies, etc at the other end of the cooler to help prevent them from freezing. Veggies like tomatoes and avocados go between the bubble wrap and the cooler lid. I'm not aware of any issues with CO2 tho.
 

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I have used the 'wrap in newspaper' or cardboard and many other dry ice techniques. Far too often something got frozen that shouldn't have or some thing came out so rock hard that it took hours to thaw. Not saying it can't be done, but it is trickier to manage dry ice in one cooler than in two.

I am forced to using two coolers due to my narrow frame design. Having both the freezer and refrigerator has been an advantage. Lettuce stays crisp, meat can thaw in the fridge overnight and one cooler can stay shut for days.

The only concern I have with CO2 is when a dry ice cooler is in the car, I like to crack a window just in case.
 

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Once pulled some oranges and apples out of a cooler with dry ice on the Selway. The fruit was all carbonated. As in it kind of fizzed/popped in your mouth like soda. Weird but not unpleasant if you knew it was coming.
 

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I run two coolers, I run a 125 and a 105... the one105 is my freezer... I usually dry ice it and have to defrost my food on day 6 or 7 and have a ton of good cocktail ice... the 125 is mostly beer.. a few veggies here and there... I have third 13 qt engle that I use to put 8 or 10 beers out of the 125 at a time to limit how much it opens..
 

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I use two coolers, one large and one smaller on mulitdays and I find it works much better for my uses. I'm rarely camping for more than 4 days though.

The smaller one is packed with the first meal or two (usually frozen), a 1/2 gal jug of ice and drinks for the first day and maybe some stuff that I don't want to freeze. The larger one is packed with everything else...as much frozen as possible. Most of my cooling comes from rectangular 1/2 gal cranberry juice jugs frozen with water.

That way I can avoid opening the larger one until at least that night (when it's cooler) and usually just to restock the small cooler with drinks. If I'm lucky I don't have to open the other cooler until the morning.

When I open the big one in the morn (when it's cooler) I try to grab all the stuff I'll need for that days meals and put them in the small cooler to thaw and cool the drinks in the small cooler. I drink the water in the small cooler as it thaws and rotate jugs from the big cooler into it when I've drank it all.

IMO one big cooler gets opened too often, is easier to become unorganized, which makes you hold the cooler open longer...things get frozen that you don't want to (esp w/ dry ice) and some stuff might get warm on top and stuff gets wet in all the shuffling. (obviously, the juice jusgs cut down on the wetness significantly)
 

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I agree, if you've got the space, two coolers would be ideal. We'd have to give up one of our dry box bays and we love having that much dry storage, rather than using rocket boxes.

Well, we sort of froze some cilantro years ago when we first started using our freezer compartment idea. I've attached a few photos. It's pretty simple. These were from a Ruby/Horsethief float, so no dry ice this time, but you get the idea.

We sometimes use an additional 30 qt cooler for frozen stuff or first meals too.
 

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cat mod this year is to fit another cooler on my boat.

I'm making a flip seat so that I can sit over one of my larger dryboxes. this will allow a few more inches space in the front for a yeti 120 cooler. So tundra 120 (maybe 100qt?) and a true 140qt cooler, along with two 16" dryboxes, one 13" drybox, and a 2' everything bag. Passenger has to either dangle feet in the water or lay down on the boxes ...
 

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Dry ice gurus - is it a problem with the CO2 in a sealed cooler building up too much pressure?
Not a guru....
Just a gut feeling, but I'd say no. We just bought a Igloo Yukon cooler that appears to be comparable to Yetis and Engels as far as seals go, but haven't used it yet. We have a Engel 30 qt w/ rubber type gasket that we took on a MF trip and used it to transport the frozen margs w/ dry ice from our house (in N. UT) to the put-in and it didn't explode in the truck. :)
 

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cat mod this year is to fit another cooler on my boat.



I'm making a flip seat so that I can sit over one of my larger dryboxes. this will allow a few more inches space in the front for a yeti 120 cooler. So tundra 120 (maybe 100qt?) and a true 140qt cooler, along with two 16" dryboxes, one 13" drybox, and a 2' everything bag. Passenger has to either dangle feet in the water or lay down on the boxes ...

I put a foot bar attached with t fittings to my front lower crossbar. Added grip tape, and the passengers were set.


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Dry ice gurus - is it a problem with the CO2 in a sealed cooler building up too much pressure?
Try the Fed Ex site.
Dry Ice Shipments in Air Transport - About FedEx


Dry ice is classified as a hazardous material by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). Since high concentrations of odorless gaseous CO2 in confined spaces such as airplanes can lead to breathing problems or even suffocation ..
That backs up the windows open in your vehicle concept.

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Due to very low temperatures, dry ice can cause severe skin damage by frostbites.
Understood.
Take some welders glovers that work well for DO and other cooking needs. Those for any Dry Ice handling.

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http://www.research.northwestern.edu/ors/forms/dry-ice-shipping.pdf

says:

Gas venting: Packages must allow for release of carbon dioxide gas. Dry ice must never be sealed in a container with an airtight seal such as a jar with a threaded lid or a plastic cooler.
{The explosion hazard will be eliminated with a package designed to vent gaseous carbon dioxide.}
I believe the way to deal with this is to vent your river cooler daily. This can also be out the drain plug if the cooler has been set up with no obstructions inside near the plug.
 

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I'm not saying one shouldn't take precautions, but in the FWIW dept. 10-15 of dry ice is gone in about 24-36 hr. or less. Depending on our route to a river, I'll usually run down to the grocery store and get 10-15 lb of DI just before we leave the house. The cheap 120 qt Igloo and the 165 Qt Igloo Marine cooler have no seals, so not an explosion issue. If we can, we'll get some more DI in Salmon or Hailey the day before we launch. We're just trying to keep the frozen stuff hard for as long as we can.

You're stopping for gas or the bathroom, the doors of the car are opening for what ever. I have to admit we usually drive with the windows closed and have never felt like it's an issue. Of course, the old Xterra wasn't that tight of a vehicle. I might rethink this a little with the new Xterra. You know FedEx is going to go way overboard with precautions. They have too.

Again, we prolly had 5 lb. of DI in a 30 qt Engel with a good rubber seal and not a problem. A good pair of gloves is probably a good idea. You don't want to be traipsing across the parking lot with just a plastic bag between the DI and your flesh. The stores usually double bag it in paper bags when we buy it.

We are on a 4/6 GC trip and are prepping & freezing the food in the cooler. We will definitely be using DI to keep the cooler frozen as long as possible down to Lees Ferry.
 
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