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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I have an old slalom kayak, written on it is: Peak Concept Sandwich Technology Airex and a sticker on it says: World Cup Final Ocoee '93. So I'm guessing it's some sort of composite and at least 25 years old. I'm just using it paddling around on a flat lake but would like to be able to put it in some whitewater. Just paddling in the lake after about 30 minutes it has about 3/4 inch of water in it. I can't tell exactly which cracks are leaking and which are not, so am thinking about putting one sheet of fiberglass or maybe kevlar(?) on the bottom and then using West Systems 105 resin and 206 slow hardener. Is that as good as any way to solve the problem? I've never done it before but looking at some Youtube vids it doesn't seem too hard. If anyone can suggest any good tuturorials it would be much appreciated. The can says one part hardener to five parts resin. It weighs next to nothing and I don't want to change that, but the leaky business is a bit much. Should a 32 oz can of resin and 7 oz can of hardener be enough to do the job, or hopefully more than enough?

Thank you for any help learning about this!
David
GA, USA
 

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um, don't do that - unless you want to gain a ton of weight on the boat - put the boat on a driveway or deck and fill it with water to start and see where it comes out.

Then put it straight up and do the same thing, and do it to the other end.

After it dries completely out, sand and repair your cracks. Also, go get the West System pumps for that resin/hardner to ensure you have the proper ratio. Heat and humidity will effect the cure time and hardness. The longer the mixed resin is in your mixing pot, the quicker it will set up.

I still have my squirt boats from the 1980's - they're irreplaceable. But the more they've sat in the sun, the more brittle they've become, especially those with Kevlar in the layup.

I bet you have either cracked seams, cracked cockpit combing, leaky grab loops, etc. The old Slalom boats were meant to be light, and some folks never put end pours in, or even did inside seams - anything to save weight.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you Ken!

I did put water in the kayak and found it has big leaks around the seat and also it's soft around the seat so at this point I'm planning to fill cracks as a first step, then go back and put fiberglass cloth in the seat area on the outer hull and maybe some inside for extra support.
 
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