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The Salmon (Idaho) always has bug hatches going on so it might not be peaceful to sleep there. Thanks for the ideas.
Salmon seems less buggy to me right on the water than 10' away in the willows

No dragging gear up the beach, no fighting others for prime tent spots. Help unload the group gear and sip a cocktail while others are wrestling with their tents.
 

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I was thinking about that...which anchors have you used, and which do you prefer?
Don't over think it, you are only trying to keep your boat from moving up onto the beach in the eddy so you don't have to pull it off shore every morning. When I was working there we had no room for anchors and just used a mesh bag or drag bag with a rock in it with a biner and rope to the back of the boat. Easy setup and no extra gear to stumble over as you just get a new rock at the next camp.

FWIW, On an April trip I would personally just sleep on shore for simplicity as you have a small group and there will be plenty of room, but to each their own. I also don't like getting wet first thing in the morning when it is that cold out and you may be in deeper water than your ditch boots can handle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I detest shlepping gear up the bank, and setting up tents is even worse...so I’m going for the nautical RV setup. The new rig is almost done, I’ll post a shot of it later.
 

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I also don't like getting wet first thing in the morning when it is that cold out and you may be in deeper water than your ditch boots can handle
Row out into the Eddie, drop your anchor, row back into shore and tighten the sliding knot on your bowline to make both ropes tight. In the morning loosen the sliding knot on your bow line, and pull yourself back up to the anchor, pull it in the boat, and then pull yourself back in with the bow line. Don't need to walk in water..... Obviously this requires that you have a decent length bowline to enable you to make a loop through the carabiner attached to a sand stake.. but then in Grand Canyon I've always tied to shore this way, beats fiddling with knots in the middle of the night to let your boat out when the tide goes down and your camped on shore
 

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Row out into the Eddie, drop your anchor, roll back into shore and tighten the sliding knot on your bowline to make both ropes tight. In the morning loosen the sliding knot on your bowel line, and pull yourself back up to the anchor, pull it in the boat, and then pull yourself back in with the bowel line. Don't need to walk in water...
You are correct. That is above some folks pay grade but since Wallrat is a climber he will know how to setup and operate a prusik knot.
 

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You are correct. That is above some folks pay grade but since Wallrat is a climber he will know how to setup and operate a prusik knot.
I use the sliding hitch
 

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I use the sliding hitch
that's the "Taut Line Hitch" out of the Boy Scout Handbook. Ideal for tent flies and guy lines. Hadn't thought to use it on a bowline.

Speaking of which, got a favorite bow/anchor line? Thinking I'll upgrade from solid braid before next season, was looking at double braided yacht mooring line. couldn't decide between 3/8 and 1/2". Doubt I'll ever need the strength of 1/2"...but would be better long-term. And it comes in proper dory colors. No, not red. haha
 

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that's the "Taut Line Hitch" out of the Boy Scout Handbook. Ideal for tent flies and guy lines. Hadn't thought to use it on a bowline.

Speaking of which, got a favorite bow/anchor line? Thinking I'll upgrade from solid braid before next season, was looking at double braided yacht mooring line. couldn't decide between 3/8 and 1/2". Doubt I'll ever need the strength of 1/2"...but would be better long-term. And it comes in proper dory colors. No, not red. haha
https://www.bluewaterropes.com/product/10-5mm-spec-static/ is what I use on my raft now days, it's pricey, but doubles as a chicken line, and should I ever need it for rescue, 50 feet that's already attached to the raft. Got tired of replacing bowlines every other year as I was using old 11mm climbing ropes from my rock / ice climbin days. They don't last worth a hoot in GC sand, whereas this stuff holds up well, coils nicely, and like I said, both chicken line, rescue line and bow line. It is a buck a foot though.. For Bears Ears, I had a nice turquoise kernmantle rope, forgot where I got it, likely amazon, complimented the Willys Jeep Beryl Green nicely. The flip lines were red though HAHAHA.

FWIW, I used to use a running bowline knot, came loose one night and I was swinging on the anchor. Lucky my ass wasn't floating down the river, big eddy at Tuckup helped.. That's when another boatman showed me the sliding half hitch, or taut line hitch, haven't had an issue since.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
https://www.bluewaterropes.com/product/10-5mm-spec-static/ is what I use on my raft now days, it's pricey, but doubles as a chicken line, and should I ever need it for rescue, 50 feet that's already attached to the raft. Got tired of replacing bowlines every other year as I was using old 11mm climbing ropes from my rock / ice climbin days. They don't last worth a hoot in GC sand, whereas this stuff holds up well, coils nicely, and like I said, both chicken line, rescue line and bow line. It is a buck a foot though.. For Bears Ears, I had a nice turquoise kernmantle rope, forgot where I got it, likely amazon, complimented the Willys Jeep Beryl Green nicely. The flip lines were red though HAHAHA.

FWIW, I used to use a running bowline knot, came loose one night and I was swinging on the anchor. Lucky my ass wasn't floating down the river, big eddy at Tuckup helped.. That's when another boatman showed me the sliding half hitch, or taut line hitch, haven't had an issue since.
Blue Water makes as fine a rope as you’ll find anywhere. They’ve long been my first choice for climbing ropes.
 

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Blue Water makes as fine a rope as you’ll find anywhere. They’ve long been my first choice for climbing ropes.
Yes sir, I totally agree. I became familiar with them when I used to scale towers to hang microwave equipment. They held up better than anything.
 
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Interesting, does polyester hold up better than nylon to sand?
I'm guessing cuz it doesn't seem to hold the sand as much as a regular climbing rope does. I have no real empirical evidence, other than my experience, but it does seem to be a tighter weave on the casing than a climbing rope, which might be the reason..
 
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I'm guessing cuz it doesn't seem to hold the sand as much as a regular climbing rope does. I have no real empirical evidence, other than my experience, but it does seem to be a tighter weave on the casing than a climbing rope, which might be the reason..
Generally speaking, Polyester is a better option for use when water is involved. Old climbing ropes are super stretchy, especially when wet and all that cycling allows sand and dirt into the core of the rope. An old 11mm climbing rope can swell to well over 1/2” in short order. They are bulky, stretchy, and become annoying very quickly as stated above.

I repurpose old lengths of canyoneering ropes for bow lines. They are woven much tighter, super static, and usually made from some combination of polyester/Technora/Dyneema. The absorb no sand, and considerably less water.
 

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As a point of clarification, climbing ropes are made out of nylon and are braided in such a way as to maximize stretch.

Nylon is generally not recommended for use in wet environments. It absorbs lots of water and can lose nearly half of its strength when saturated.

I also use an eye-to-eye hitch cord for tying off so I can adjust the tension as needed without retying.
 

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Nope. You might get a little rain but minutes only. If you flip with the bimni open it will be big problem. April trips have the greatest temperature fluctations, which means big wind gusts. You want something that breaks off if it has too and you don't care about it. That is why most outifitters just you big umbrellas. Lose it no sweat. More importantly a bimini in the wind will blow the boat places you might now want to go. Hot summer days, different story, April, no way.

Sleep on a Jack's Plastic Welding paco pad (or 2). I lay mine out on the stainless steel, no problems with heat or cold (I have a Guide Silver or whatever the biggest one is.) I sleep on the boat every night. 99% of the time if it rains (1 every 4-5 trips I pull out a piece of waterproof nylong that is 6' x 8' and just cover up under it. If it is going to storm I use a single pole floorless tent that I attach to the D-rings and put the pull in the rear center of the boat where I"m sleeping. I've used twice in the past 20 years.

I've seen more bimni's come out of the canyon lashed to the frame someplace a bent mess thant still being used in the Grand.

Jim
 

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Nope. You might get a little rain but minutes only. If you flip with the bimni open it will be big problem. April trips have the greatest temperature fluctations, which means big wind gusts. You want something that breaks off if it has too and you don't care about it. That is why most outifitters just you big umbrellas. Lose it no sweat. More importantly a bimini in the wind will blow the boat places you might now want to go. Hot summer days, different story, April, no way.

Sleep on a Jack's Plastic Welding paco pad (or 2). I lay mine out on the stainless steel, no problems with heat or cold (I have a Guide Silver or whatever the biggest one is.) I sleep on the boat every night. 99% of the time if it rains (1 every 4-5 trips I pull out a piece of waterproof nylong that is 6' x 8' and just cover up under it. If it is going to storm I use a single pole floorless tent that I attach to the D-rings and put the pull in the rear center of the boat where I"m sleeping. I've used twice in the past 20 years.

I've seen more bimni's come out of the canyon lashed to the frame someplace a bent mess thant still being used in the Grand.

Jim
People don't actually put them {Bimini} up on the water, do they? Damn good point though Jim..

I've used them in the past, makes a nice shady spot while the boat is tied up, but even in summer I wouldn't float with it up! From my experience it's quite windy in April..
 
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During the orientation talk at the put in for private boaters one of the slides was a couple who were setting off from the put in with a bimini up. The next picture was at badger or soap (both are easy ways for the ranger to get down to the river quickly and see what is going on if they don't like your answers). The bimini was wrapped around everything, the couple were franticaly trying to figure out what happened, one oar was wrapped around the bimini and they were floating in the eddy.

I row with an umbrella up, but not tied up. Just open. Any wind it drops. Tied up to show I guy line it. If we are hiking I drop a pole so it sets right on the cooler. I shove a wet beach towel under the cooler straps and lay my PFD on top, (strapped to the cooler straps) then drop the umbrella on top. All to keep the cooler's cold. Wind does not bend poles when the umbrella is dropped down.
 
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