Mountain Buzz banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All,
Have an Everest Camp Chef 2 burner. Worked well until this weekend. Now when hooked up, propane will just vent out of the hole in the black plastic pat of the regulator. Its even dangerous in this condition, I would think (good thing I don't smoke). It seems the regulator has failed.
Sheesh, I'm glad I didn't get blown up this weekend......

I contacted Camp Chef. They said I had to buy another one because it is out of warranty ($20). Seems like a product design problem.

What would you do?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,207 Posts
All,
Have an Everest Camp Chef 2 burner. Worked well until this weekend. Now when hooked up, propane will just vent out of the hole in the black plastic pat of the regulator. Its even dangerous in this condition, I would think (good thing I don't smoke). It seems the regulator has failed.
Sheesh, I'm glad I didn't get blown up this weekend......

I contacted Camp Chef. They said I had to buy another one because it is out of warranty ($20). Seems like a product design problem.

What would you do?
I've already done it - replace the regulator with a hosed one (instead of rigid brass) from Stansport. I haven't actually tried the new regulator but numerous people online said they used the Stansport part on camp chef stoves... It was also about $20 and will be easier to set up then the original one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,207 Posts
So I don't know if it actually failed or it's just hyper sensitive to pressure changes. One of the last posters on the other thread mentioned it could be the leak prevention system in the newer style hoses too. I hadn't actually thought through all the possible scenarios but last year I bought a splitter for two of the newer style of connectors. Thinking back that's about when I started having the Everest die out. I honestly hadn't really put 2 and 2 together but in hind sight I might have been bouncing between my old internal hose connector (which worked fine?) and the new plastic one (which didn't?). It's entirely possible that is what it is because when I tried disconnecting the whole system most recently I would get good flow for a second then it would die down. In this last case I know I was using the newer style hose and really wish I would have thought to switch out to my older hose... anyways all I know is that I decided to buy a hose type connector because I always hated the rigid style and It'll either fix the bad regulator or I'll start running through my hoses and see if that isn't it.

So long story short I bought one of these: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005EUE214/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 and I will bring all my hoses until I figure it out...

I will try the Stansport hose tonight on my stove and leave it burning for an hour our so to make sure I don't get a repeat of the problem... I'll report back. I need to clean my garage anyways so I can run the stove outside while I organize chaos.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,207 Posts
but yes that was the part that failed...if it indeed failed and isn't OE/connection issues...This has been a good exercise for me - now I can do some experimentation if I can only get camping again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,207 Posts
I did not get a chance last night to work on the regulator/hose issue. I should be able to tonight....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,207 Posts
So I did a lot of experimenting last night (not so much garage cleaning) and figured a few things out.

First my Camp Chef regulator is fine. The problem with that set up was my hose. I don't know if it's clogged or if the connector has a check valve that's stuck or what but it was the large plastic connector that threads over the tank valve. I had read a few years ago that they can go bad fairly easily but I'm not sure how exactly. It acts exactly like the excess flow check valve is tripping, but I thought that was in the tank... At any rate my old school all brass fittings that thread into the tank valve still work like a charm. I tried 2 different tanks, a little green bottle and about 6 different hoses. The one hose didn't work in any combination (hot flame for a few seconds then a trickle). I tried slowly opening the tank as well.

Second; the Stansport replacement regulator with a hose works great. I put it on, pressured it up and soaped up all the connections just to be sure it didn't "almost" fit and saw no leaks. So I fired her up and all worked fine. Boiled some water and ran both burners full on for about an hour and had no issues... I definitely like it better than the hard plumbed regulator that came with the stove. The new one is easier to thread into the stove and easier to connect my extension hose to. It'll become my primary and the original one will be relegated to living in the repair kit.

In the end, since there is no way to jury-rig the type of connection these stoves use it's probably a good idea to have a spare regulator. I'm happy I do no for sure, even though it wasn't my problem...

That's all I know for now!

Have a great trip Jerry! I wish I was going along!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
I've been using those stansport hoses on a pair of Camp Chef Everests for the last year or two. I like them better for ease of setup than the rigid ones but they tend to fail about as much in my experience. It's frustrating how poor the quality of that size/type of regulator tends to be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
is there any way to set up the hose to have a regular sized regulator near the tank, and the smaller stove fitting? instead of a 2 part set up?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Mountain Series Flexible Regulator Kit

I've been reading all kinds of reviews about the rigid regulators on Camp Chef stoves. Our stove quit working several times and I'm finally ready to fix it for good. The flexible hose makes much more sense than the rigid one for sure.

Back when these blog threads were fresh, the Stansport replacement on Amazon was cheaper but now it's $32
But you can get the same thing from Walmart for $23


The Camp Chef part is $27 from Camp Chef (+ shipping) and you can't buy it anywhere else at a store that I could find.

Outdoor Cooking has it for $25
https://www.outdoorcooking.com/mountain-series-flexible-regulator-kit.html

Just wanted to save people the time searching. It will fit any Camp Chef Mountain Series stove. I have an Everest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,336 Posts
is there any way to set up the hose to have a regular sized regulator near the tank, and the smaller stove fitting? instead of a 2 part set up?
Not officially. But that's an AWESOME idea!



If you knew someone who did hydraulic or plumbing work, you could potentially cut the brass stem, cut or roll in some barbs, and then crimp on a hose with a standard NPS fitting you can screw into a normal regulator/hose fitting.

A regular sized adjustable regulator, QCC-1 propane connector and hose run as low as $13 on Amazon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
The great thing about the Buzz is that there are plenty of smart people who know a lot about gear. Usually if you wait a while someone will come along and answer your question. Since nobody has done that for this issue, I will give it a try. Camp Chef has three models built around the 20 thousand BTU burner. The first, and main one, is the Everest. I own one, it is a great stove. You can get them for around a hundred bucks, and if you wait till someone on the internet has a coupon, combined with free shipping, you can get one for $80. You’re getting a lot of stove for that price. Of course, it is a fiction to think that you can routinely run a 40K BTU stove on a one pound green bottle. I can only assume that Camp Chef did that to keep the price point of the stove as low as possible.

I don’t know who came up with the style of green bottle regulator that comes with the Everest. I first saw it on a Coleman stove years ago. (By the way, Coleman regulators won’t work on an Everest stove.) Almost all the others are probably made in the same Chinese factory. I am currently using a Primus regulator on my stove. You can find the same regulator with either a ridgid pipe or a flexible hose. It doesn’t make any difference, it is the same regulator. This regulator was originally intended for stoves with a 10-12 thousand BTU burner. My guess is that at the higher demand rate of the larger burners, any little issue in regulator performance becomes much more obvious. Regulator complaints are routinely made about the Everest, but the same regulator is fine on many other smaller stoves.

Like all regulators, this one is susceptible to dirt plugging it up. If you run it on a large tank, my recommendation is to keep the regulator permanently attached to the hose that you connect to the large tank. Do not routinely disconnect it. This will keep it cleaner. I have been doing this and never had a problem. Since the regulator is the only thing that seems to fail, I also carry a spare. It is cheap insurance.

There is now a better solution to this regulator issue. There are 2 other stove models that Camp Chef makes using this burner. First is the Summit, which is basically the same stove, made specifically for REI, that has adjustable feet, a different igniter switch, and different style control knobs. Interestingly, REI no longer sells it, but is it available. The second is the Mountaineer 2. It is designed to be a Partner clone. It is the same burner and valves, put in a welded aluminum box. To make it seem more like a Partner stove, they doubled the price. The one difference is that it comes with a completely different regulator and hose set up that hooks up directly to a standard tank.

If you look closely you will notice that the Mountaineer 2 uses the same compression fitting that the Everest and almost all other stoves use. You can’t buy this fitting, because no one will sell it separately. I assume this is for liability and safety reasons. The stove manufacturers don’t want people making their own propane supply setups. If you check the internet, you can’t find this hose and regulator for sale. But if you call the Camp Chef 1-800 number for customer service, they will tell you that it will work perfectly fine on an Everest stove. They will also gladly sell you one for $28.99, plus $4 shipping. They told me that someday they will update the website, and have it for sale on line.

I hope this info helps out anyone with one of these stoves. Let me know if you have any other questions. For the record, I am not affiliated with Camp Chef or anyone else. If anyone wants to compensate me to critique gear, I am always available to listen to all offers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
The great thing about the Buzz is that there are plenty of smart people who know a lot about gear. Usually if you wait a while someone will come along and answer your question. Since nobody has done that for this issue, I will give it a try. Camp Chef has three models built around the 20 thousand BTU burner. The first, and main one, is the Everest. I own one, it is a great stove. You can get them for around a hundred bucks, and if you wait till someone on the internet has a coupon, combined with free shipping, you can get one for $80. You’re getting a lot of stove for that price. Of course, it is a fiction to think that you can routinely run a 40K BTU stove on a one pound green bottle. I can only assume that Camp Chef did that to keep the price point of the stove as low as possible.

I don’t know who came up with the style of green bottle regulator that comes with the Everest. I first saw it on a Coleman stove years ago. (By the way, Coleman regulators won’t work on an Everest stove.) Almost all the others are probably made in the same Chinese factory. I am currently using a Primus regulator on my stove. You can find the same regulator with either a ridgid pipe or a flexible hose. It doesn’t make any difference, it is the same regulator. This regulator was originally intended for stoves with a 10-12 thousand BTU burner. My guess is that at the higher demand rate of the larger burners, any little issue in regulator performance becomes much more obvious. Regulator complaints are routinely made about the Everest, but the same regulator is fine on many other smaller stoves.

Like all regulators, this one is susceptible to dirt plugging it up. If you run it on a large tank, my recommendation is to keep the regulator permanently attached to the hose that you connect to the large tank. Do not routinely disconnect it. This will keep it cleaner. I have been doing this and never had a problem. Since the regulator is the only thing that seems to fail, I also carry a spare. It is cheap insurance.

There is now a better solution to this regulator issue. There are 2 other stove models that Camp Chef makes using this burner. First is the Summit, which is basically the same stove, made specifically for REI, that has adjustable feet, a different igniter switch, and different style control knobs. Interestingly, REI no longer sells it, but is it available. The second is the Mountaineer 2. It is designed to be a Partner clone. It is the same burner and valves, put in a welded aluminum box. To make it seem more like a Partner stove, they doubled the price. The one difference is that it comes with a completely different regulator and hose set up that hooks up directly to a standard tank.

If you look closely you will notice that the Mountaineer 2 uses the same compression fitting that the Everest and almost all other stoves use. You can’t buy this fitting, because no one will sell it separately. I assume this is for liability and safety reasons. The stove manufacturers don’t want people making their own propane supply setups. If you check the internet, you can’t find this hose and regulator for sale. But if you call the Camp Chef 1-800 number for customer service, they will tell you that it will work perfectly fine on an Everest stove. They will also gladly sell you one for $28.99, plus $4 shipping. They told me that someday they will update the website, and have it for sale on line.

I hope this info helps out anyone with one of these stoves. Let me know if you have any other questions. For the record, I am not affiliated with Camp Chef or anyone else. If anyone wants to compensate me to critique gear, I am always available to listen to all offers.
This is back in stock at CampChef, at least for right now. They have been out of stock for 2 years minimum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Mountain Series Flexible Regulator Kit

I've been reading all kinds of reviews about the rigid regulators on Camp Chef stoves. Our stove quit working several times and I'm finally ready to fix it for good. The flexible hose makes much more sense than the rigid one for sure.

Back when these blog threads were fresh, the Stansport replacement on Amazon was cheaper but now it's $32
But you can get the same thing from Walmart for $23


The Camp Chef part is $27 from Camp Chef (+ shipping) and you can't buy it anywhere else at a store that I could find.

Outdoor Cooking has it for $25
Flexible Regulator Kit

Just wanted to save people the time searching. It will fit any Camp Chef Mountain Series stove. I have an Everest.
Just wanted to put in an update. Since getting the flexible hose regulator, we have had zero problems. Many trips, lots of use. I wish they (The Camp Chef stoves) would just come with the flexible hose instead of the rigid one. Great stove otherwise!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
All,
Have an Everest Camp Chef 2 burner. Worked well until this weekend. Now when hooked up, propane will just vent out of the hole in the black plastic pat of the regulator. Its even dangerous in this condition, I would think (good thing I don't smoke). It seems the regulator has failed.
Sheesh, I'm glad I didn't get blown up this weekend......

I contacted Camp Chef. They said I had to buy another one because it is out of warranty ($20). Seems like a product design problem.

What would you do?
I bought a new Camp Chef Everest 2X and had trouble when connecting it to a 5 gal propane bottle. It seems there is a "low flow" mode that can be a problem when using the big tanks. The symptom is the stove starts and then dies or has almost no flame output. The solution seems to be not to open the valve on the tank full blast. The high pressure causes the requlator to go into "low-flow" mode. The solution seems to be to only open the tank valve to about 1/3 to 1/2 turn. Worked for me.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top