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windknot2
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Discussion Starter #1
I have a couple of cam straps on which the ends have become frayed. In addition to being cut on an angle, new straps seem to have had some kind of glue or something applied to the last 1 inch or so to help keep this from happening. I plan to cut off the damaged ends and was wondering if anyone knows what is usually used to treat the straps. Thanks for any advice.
Windknot2
 

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Hi,

I use a flattened tip on a soldering iron to cut new angles, and then take a sideways swipe on each side, to thin the edge a bit and improve the way the tip goes into the buckle.

FWIW.

Rich Phillips
 

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I have a couple of cam straps on which the ends have become frayed. In addition to being cut on an angle, new straps seem to have had some kind of glue or something applied to the last 1 inch or so to help keep this from happening. I plan to cut off the damaged ends and was wondering if anyone knows what is usually used to treat the straps. Thanks for any advice.
Windknot2
Straps are usually cut with a hot wire although you probably don't have access to that type of equipment. You can just use a lighter to basically cauterize the end of the cut and keep it from fraying. I think some people also use there ski wax iron in order to basically flatten the end of the strap
 

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I use a propane torch and roll it with a glass jar or flatten it with a heavy metal spatula.

The soldering iron sounds interesting.
 

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Most new straps have the last inch or so heat fused, that is what appears to be glue.

Polyester and polypro can be fused with a really hot cloths iron. Get one from the thrift store since the plastic residue will ruin the iron for using on cloths.

For nylon straps I have had good results using a propane torch. A few quick passes with the flame and the webbing shrinks down and fuses. Practice on some scraps, the difference between fused and cook to brittle is subtle.
 

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Hi Carvedog,

Yeah, this flat accessory item came with the soldering iron, along with the usual array of regular sized tips. The actual working portion is about the size of your small fingernail, maybe a sixteenth of an inch thick, and heats up nice and fast with a pull of the trigger.

FWIW.

Rich Phillips
 

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fat guy in a little boat
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try heating up a butter knife with a torch and just cutting the strap wherever you want.
the melted end won't last forever, but it usually holds up pretty well (the strap i wear for a belt is still melted together well enough after a year or so)
and it'll still fit through the cam buckle easily.
 

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Every Lowe's and Home Depot I've been to that have a rope section have that hot wire cutter that Avatard mentions. If you live close to one, that's a free option. But I've also done the lighter melt and press with flat object.
 

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try heating up a butter knife with a torch and just cutting the strap wherever you want.
the melted end won't last forever, but it usually holds up pretty well (the strap i wear for a belt is still melted together well enough after a year or so)
and it'll still fit through the cam buckle easily.
I second the butter knife. Find one you won't want to use again for eating, though. I usually use a gas stove top to heat it up. Get the end glowing and it will slice right through the strap and fuse the end simultaneously.
 

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I cut at an angle, start the melting process over a candle and then use an iron and an old cookie sheet to taper both sides pressing the strap with the iron against the cookie sheet. As has been stated, don't overheat it. Sometimes as I am tapering some string of melted strap extend out from the finished product. I cut these off with scissors.
The iron and cookie sheet were going to be thrown away so I am doing my best to recycle :D
 

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windknot2
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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks to everyone who responded. After reading the suggestions and not being able to talk my wife out of her iron or butter knife, I used a Bernz-O-Matic propane torch to heat the end of a putty knife. It worked well to cut off the frayed ends of the straps on an angle as well as ironing the last inch or so of the strap on both sides. I performed all the above on a metal topped worked bench. The results look good to me. This forum is always super helpful.
Windknot 2
 
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