Mountain Buzz banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have run the Cabarton dozens of times but mostly on my buddies panther. I found 14' foot avon round boat with an oaring frame(which is exactly what I want) for $850. The problem is that it is a standard floor with a foam insert. I have read numerous posts that the self bailing floor is the way to go and I believe you BUT I want to hear from someone who has actually used one, not someone who just turns their nose up to the idea of a standard floor. I know it's a pain in the ass but how much of a pain in the ass is it? This boat could give me the opportunity to convince my wife to spend the money to get a raft as opposed to possibly not getting one at all. I won't be doing anything much more than the Cabarton. What percentage of time on the river do you spend bailing? Can it get you into as much trouble as people imply? Basically would I be okay getting this one to gauge if it would be worth it for me to upgrade in the future?

Thanks in advance for your time.

J


Sent from my iPad using Mountain Buzz
 

·
Paddling in to the Future
Joined
·
574 Posts
I have run the Cabarton dozens of times but mostly on my buddies panther. I found 14' foot avon round boat with an oaring frame(which is exactly what I want) for $850. The problem is that it is a standard floor with a foam insert. I have read numerous posts that the self bailing floor is the way to go and I believe you BUT I want to hear from someone who has actually used one, not someone who just turns their nose up to the idea of a standard floor. I know it's a pain in the ass but how much of a pain in the ass is it? This boat could give me the opportunity to convince my wife to spend the money to get a raft as opposed to possibly not getting one at all. I won't be doing anything much more than the Cabarton. What percentage of time on the river do you spend bailing? Can it get you into as much trouble as people imply? Basically would I be okay getting this one to gauge if it would be worth it for me to upgrade in the future?

Thanks in advance for your time.

J


Sent from my iPad using Mountain Buzz
On the Cabarton.. you'll most likely just dump it when you take out. might get a little water in there at Trestle, some at francois, then you'll be hitting Howards Plunge and taking out. I doubt you'll spend any time bailing. the little bit of water that will be in there won't affect your ride much at all. - if you're just planning on playing on the Cabarton and the Main, I think you'll do fine with a bucket boat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,261 Posts
Buy it....it looks in good shape and sounds like it will serve your needs. When you are ready to upgrade I will buy it from ya.....just ping me sideband ... would try and buy it myself but have no cash this year due to medical expenses.

Phillip
 

·
Paddling in to the Future
Joined
·
574 Posts
yeah, to echo restrac2000 - get it, its a good deal. I'll float along with you too! Love playing on the cabarton.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Bucket Boat

JB: Don't hesitate, AVONS were the cadillac of rafts in their day. I own 5 and love them all. Bucket Boats were the only rafts used during my time working commercially during the 70's. We used them in the Grand Canyon, as well as on the technical rivers throughout California & Oregon, Idaho & Alaska. I like their feel better than that of self bailers, and they slide over shallow rocks on the MFS at 2 feet. The best thing about the standard floor, in my opinion, is that one can rig lower creating a lower center of gravity as well as less wind resistance for long days on the utah rivers. Easier to roll up and to patch, should you damage the floor.
One can at times take on a lot of water, especially in the Canyon. We used to have a saying that "You know you have taken on a lot of water if when you stand on the floor you can not see over the tubes." This would require about 30 minutes of bailing, however happened rarely. We sometimes would do a submarine run of Lava be adding 100 or so buckets of water to the bilge at the top and point her straight down the middle of the V-Waves leading to the big hole at bottom right. Lots of fun & no flips!
Don't let the newer generation of boatmen convince you that you gotta have a self bailer. Drive that classic and notice all of the older boaters giving you the high sign, as if you dove by in a 57' Chevy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
I don't know about the Cabarton, but I like the way buckets track and hold. If you are running pool/drop then it's not that big of a deal. On one trip down the grand I saw 3 bucket boats run the guts down hermit ('96 or '97 when it was Huge) and 2 SB's. Both SB's flipped. Kinda of made a lasting impression given the 2 SB's were piloted by long time guides.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,049 Posts
If it holds air, or even if it needs a few patches, buy it. Check the baffles and take some soapy water in a spray bottle to look for leaks when you inspect it. You can always upgrade to a SB later. Not only will it get you on the water now but, after she gets to bail after any Class III rapids, it'll be easier to sell your wife on getting a self-bailer. :)

I started with a bucket boat and upgraded to SB when I had the $$. Then sold the bucket boat for what my buddy and I paid for it. If it is in any kind of decent shape, you can sell the bucket boat for $400 - $500.

Get out there and do it!

And have fun,

-AH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,525 Posts
^^^^Definitely.


Someone posted a week or so ago about a similar setup for $2k. Seemed a bit much.

For $850, you really can't go wrong. It also depends on the frame. If it's a so-so backyard conduit frame with cheezy oarlocks and bent up Carlisle oars...it's an OK deal.

If it's a decent frame and the oars are in pretty good shape, it's a steal for the rigging alone, and if the boat is in good shape, it will give you years of fun. Even after you get an SB, keep it for drier runs in colder, lower water. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
I would be a little bit concerned about the seam tape on that boat. I still think its worth the money, you just may have to buy some seam tape, cut off the loose pieces of existing tape, and patch over it. Couple of hours and $100 worth of materials would solve this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Call quick, this thing has been listed for 4 days already. I think the frame is worth a minimum of $150 and each oar is worth $100. If you use my math that makes the boat only $500. Try offerinf $700.
 

·
Old Guy in a PFD
Joined
·
1,106 Posts
Don't know about the Cabarton, but an Avon bucket rigged for $750?
Heck yes!

It floats, it will carry you and your beer.

Everything else is just attitude.

Even if you have to bail on every trip, it ain't that bad an excercise. You can get a rhythm going; dip (bail bucket into the water in the boat) Sip (of beer) dump (bucket overboard) Sip (of beer) Dip etc. etc.

See, this way you can say "that was a 2 beer bail, or a 4 bu bal, or a
sis pa ballllll.......

But one other thing; bucket boats aren't exactly old school, but I'd be replacing them plastic oars with some honest wood ones.

Again, attitude.

Seriously; I've run both, they both float, they both carry beer. With the one you gotta occasionally bail out the damn boat, with the other you gotta occasionally unflip the damn boat.

That's my attitude.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
795 Posts
To echo everyone else....HELL YEAH!! Avon buckets are badass. Still have two of them...though they don't see the water much any more.

I spent my childhood bailing these boats...designated bucket boy...it was a blast when I had to bail...continuous water fight most of the way down the river. In all honesty though....on Cabarton and the Main you won't have to do very much at all...at least not during normal summer flows. Higher water Main you might get a few more splashes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Damn poverty boaters. Destroying the industry and the economy. Whip out the visa and get the NRS set up. Really, how's your local shop supposed to make it if you only buy a few straps and glue every so often?


Sent from my iPhone using Mountain Buzz
 

·
Paddling in to the Future
Joined
·
574 Posts
Damn poverty boaters. Destroying the industry and the economy. Whip out the visa and get the NRS set up. Really, how's your local shop supposed to make it if you only buy a few straps and glue every so often?


Sent from my iPhone using Mountain Buzz
Sarcasm I hope, those NRS boats are made in China and shipped to Idaho. Go with Aire, Maravia, etc. if you want a locally produced boat.

but as with the NRS, Aire, Maravia, Avon, Sotar, etc. you shouldnt have to replace the boat all that often unless you don't take care of your equipment at all.
 

·
aka The Curmudgeon
Joined
·
354 Posts
Buying a raft is like buying a sailboat. Buy the best boat you can afford NOW!. If you can afford a bigger/nicer boat down the road, then Good For You. The most important thing is to get the best you can get right now, and USE IT! When you get a better one, a fellow Buzzard will be thankful for the good deal you give him/her when it's time to upgrade.
Peace,
The Capt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
506 Posts
Sarcasm I hope, those NRS boats are made in China and shipped to Idaho. Go with Aire, Maravia, etc. if you want a locally produced boat.



but as with the NRS, Aire, Maravia, Avon, Sotar, etc. you shouldnt have to replace the boat all that often unless you don't take care of your equipment at all.

I think Aire tribes are made in China or somewhere near. Pretty sure NRS hypalon is all Belgian and not Chinese like the others use and they are manufactured in Mexico not China.
That bucket boat is a sweet deal for sure. Everything looks river ready. I wouldn't worry about the seam tape it looks decent. Those oars are heavy but more than serviceable. They are not plastic but are steal or aluminum pipe with a plastic coating. Wood is nice but will cost near what the raft/frame package cost.


Jim
 

·
Paddling in to the Future
Joined
·
574 Posts
I think Aire tribes are made in China or somewhere near. Pretty sure NRS hypalon is all Belgian and not Chinese like the others use and they are manufactured in Mexico not China.
That bucket boat is a sweet deal for sure. Everything looks river ready. I wouldn't worry about the seam tape it looks decent. Those oars are heavy but more than serviceable. They are not plastic but are steal or aluminum pipe with a plastic coating. Wood is nice but will cost near what the raft/frame package cost.


Jim
Tribs are china, Aire is all Meridian Idaho, Maravia in Beautiful boise, right next to the Boise River. Belgium, Mexico, China, - none of them are America. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
506 Posts
Tribs are china, Aire is all Meridian Idaho, Maravia in Beautiful boise, right next to the Boise River. Belgium, Mexico, China, - none of them are America. :)

Yeah you are right about Maravia. I love mine. I think they are an awesome product and I do appreciate built in the USA for sure. I also like Aire. My first boat was an Aire and I think they are a great company.
If I were buying a bucket boat I would try and get hypalon. Yes it is personal preference I just like how they preform. My 16.5' Avon bucket rolls up smaller than my Maravia Spider (13').
I hear the hypalon that NRS uses is the best available. To bad you can't get them to do a bucket.


Jim
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top